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I use conti chilli black and am happy with them, however Mr BogFrog is going through them at a rather alarming rate.  Not only that, but he gets at least 4x the punctures I get. I reckon it's nearer 6. We think it's probably a weight differential thing? I'm 56kg and run my tubes at 90psi, he is 90kg and runs his as 110psi...  

Question 1: Anyone see a problem with his setup?

Question 2: Any advice on different tyres that are more durable and will result in fewer punctures?

Thanks brains trust!

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Just now, BogFrog said:

He runs deCADENce 38mm wheels.  These are 27.3mm wide and he runs 25's

Are there any tyres that are considered more "hardy" and less puncture prone?

I think Black Chilli is a feature of some Continental tyres, not a tyre model. Presumably you are using GP4000s which were the best balance of rolling resistance/speed and durability. Now there is a GP5000 which are better in all regards but also more $$...

For everyday riding I just use gatorskins or gator hardshells which are a lot more resilient. Then I put on something that rolls better for races.

Oh and I dont go over 100psi. the ride must be bone jarring...

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I also use Continental Gatorskin as my training tyres. For races I switch to the GP5000. The Gatorskin's are a "slow" tyre but have great puncture resistance.

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GP5000s are excellent for puncture protection. Run at 90 - 100 psi. If he's regularly getting flats, switch to gatorskins. Slow as shit, but he won't get a flat. 

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I use 25mm GP5000s as well, I'm 62kg and run them at about 85psi. I rotate the tyres about once a year I reckon and I haven't had a flat in a long time. Obviously, luck comes into play with flats as well.

 

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I was a huge fan of the GP4000SII and did not suffer the sidewall issue that many did luckily. Over they years, I had one set that that cut up more readily than the others, apart from that, all good.

On my road bike I run 25s them on HAD Belgium Plus rims  at 82psi.

On my TT bike I run the same tyre on 2017 Zipp Firecrest 404 at 86psi

My weight yo-yos but I'm averaging over those years, approx 85kgs

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Forgot to say, the reason I didn't switch to 5000s was that Wiggle were doing great deals on pairs of the 4k, so I bought up a few. Got one more set to go but haven't been on the road ages.

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1 hour ago, FatPom said:

Forgot to say, the reason I didn't switch to 5000s was that Wiggle were doing great deals on pairs of the 4k, so I bought up a few. Got one more set to go but haven't been on the road ages.

The only reason I have the 5000s is because my old bike (with 4000s) got stolen! No flats in 3 years on those tyres.

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21 hours ago, pieman said:

I think Black Chilli is a feature of some Continental tyres, not a tyre model. Presumably you are using GP4000s which were the best balance of rolling resistance/speed and durability. Now there is a GP5000 which are better in all regards but also more $$...

For everyday riding I just use gatorskins or gator hardshells which are a lot more resilient. Then I put on something that rolls better for races.

Oh and I dont go over 100psi. the ride must be bone jarring...

If you’re thinking about gatorskins, you might also want to look at schwalbe marathons.

Besides being able to get 1,000s of puncture-free kms out of them, you won’t need a pet gorilla to get them on the rim.

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3 hours ago, trilobite said:

If you’re thinking about gatorskins, you might also want to look at schwalbe marathons.

Besides being able to get 1,000s of puncture-free kms out of them, you won’t need a pet gorilla to get them on the rim.

I have no problems getting Gatorskins on different sets of wheels. I think it is the wheel / combo that makes getting a tyre on easy or hard.

My tubeless tyres (which I have converted to tubed) require 3 tyre levers and a lot of swearing to get on.

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I ride a bike with disc brakes (sorry Callum Dalgleish McGregor) and run 28cc Conti 5000s with tubes and sealant and think they’re great.

I’ve recently purchased a set of these wheels below and the tyres measure 30cc. I’m around 71kg and run 85 psi rear and 75 psi front.

https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/equipment/cycling-components/bike-wheels/road-bike-wheels/bontrager-aeolus-pro-37-tlr-disc-road-wheel/p/31547/

Edited by fiftyplus
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I been riding 20 years and only had 1 flat in training (2 in a race)

although I’ve done 95% of my riding on trainer in last 10 years (up to 20hrs a week)

we allways run conti gp4000 and now the 5000 , super reliable 

I think you are running way too much pressure , maybe drop it to 80-90psi and see how you go 

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Just saying.

I find that if I get flats it’s because I have run over something ie: glass, or wire or when it’s wet and they soften up a bit. or the tyres are severely worn (too many is on them). 
Not sure it has much to do with the tyre or pressure or weight etc.

I can go a year with out a flat then I will have 2, 3 or 4 over a couple of weeks. I get a new tyre and the cycle repeats.

I run my tyres at a pressure called hard. Which probably equates to about 100-110psi.

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Thanks for all the replies.  Apparently he has been running his tyres at 100 for the last 6 months....  His last tyre was bought in a shop and was the conti gp5000.  The tyre lasted 6-8 weeks before he had to replace it - had holes throughout. 

We've moved to Canberra from Sydney and while the riding here is much much better, the punctures are about 4 times more common.  This means I've had 3 in 15months and he has given up count...  there are very few road sweepers here...

He tried gatorskins in the past and wasn't impressed.  He went to 99bikes and they recommended the Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR Folding Road Tyre which is he trying on the back...

Edited by BogFrog
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First thing I thought when I read your OP was tyre pressure.  I used to run at 100+, but then just started doing 90psi and puncture rate dropped noticeably.

We run Gatorskins on our training roadies.  They are worn horribly flat as we do a lot of the windtrainers, but still go OK on the road.

Our P3s both have tubeless, and frankly I wish they did not.  Leaking valve extenders and gluing on tyres (and getting them off because too much glue has been used - you really only need 1 coat on the rim for TT, it's not like criterium) is a pain in the arse, but we get by.  Again, the only time I blew one was in a HIM when I was new to them and ran at 110-120.  Now I run them at 90-100.

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1 hour ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Our P3s both have tubeless, and frankly I wish they did not.  Leaking valve extenders and gluing on tyres (and getting them off because too much glue has been used - you really only need 1 coat on the rim for TT, it's not like criterium) is a pain in the arse, but we get by.  Again, the only time I blew one was in a HIM when I was new to them and ran at 110-120.  Now I run them at 90-100.

Are you talking tubular or tubeless? Very different

I run GP5000 tubeless on my road bike on Cadem wheels, Auckland likes having glass all over the road so may only get 6 months as tubeless, then put tube in and get another 6 months before getting repeated punctures. Run at 80-90 psi, 28mm, 85kg, slow.  This setup is for comfort and enjoying riding.

my TT bike training wheels run Victoria Robuno's on (very similar to GP5000), tubed, 90psi, 25mm. again this setup is on older AL rims that cant easily be tubeless. the setup is about riding and reliablity.

Race wheels are a pair of HED Stingers 2007, run tubular 23mm, at 90 psi, generally similar type of tyre to above but not allot of choice when purchasing as range/availability limited. Now only use in final training and racing due to cost of puncture. These ride really nice, i glue myself.

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2 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

Are you talking tubular or tubeless? Very different

I run GP5000 tubeless on my road bike on Cadem wheels, Auckland likes having glass all over the road so may only get 6 months as tubeless, then put tube in and get another 6 months before getting repeated punctures. Run at 80-90 psi, 28mm, 85kg, slow.  This setup is for comfort and enjoying riding.

my TT bike training wheels run Victoria Robuno's on (very similar to GP5000), tubed, 90psi, 25mm. again this setup is on older AL rims that cant easily be tubeless. the setup is about riding and reliablity.

Race wheels are a pair of HED Stingers 2007, run tubular 23mm, at 90 psi, generally similar type of tyre to above but not allot of choice when purchasing as range/availability limited. Now only use in final training and racing due to cost of puncture. These ride really nice, i glue myself.

Sorry, tubular is what I meant.

What I find amusing about tubulars is the voodoo talk about gluing them on as if it requires a Phd in glue technology.  Our LBS likes to scare me about this insisting they should be doing it.  It's easy as piss, the biggest challenge is getting them centered....and cleaning the old glue off the rim (I barely bother).

Getting valve extenders sorted however is voodoo shit.  I recently found out Vittoria tubulars come with 2 different types of valves - one which is fused to the tube (my preference as you can put the valve core right at the end of the extender so you can screw it closed & put Doc Blue in easily). And those where the valve actually screws on/off right at the tyre, and you have to put the valve core at the end of that valve, leave it open, then screw the extender over that = PTA to get a good seal/put Doc Blue in.

My P3 has the former (older Vitorrias?) and my Mrs P3 has the later (newer = PTA).  My tyres stay up a long time, her rear one is only good for maybe 5hrs due to the valve not sealing well.

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1 hour ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Sorry, tubular is what I meant.

What I find amusing about tubulars is the voodoo talk about gluing them on as if it requires a Phd in glue technology.  Our LBS likes to scare me about this insisting they should be doing it.  It's easy as piss, the biggest challenge is getting them centered....and cleaning the old glue off the rim (I barely bother).

The LBS comment is interesting, my TT bike (actual a Felt AR aero road bike, with clip ons) is in getting its pre IMNZ rebuild, and I said to the staff not to re-glue/worry about tubulars as i would re-glue myself; then it is only me cursing myself if I puncture and need to change a tubular. They laughed and agreed.

No PHD required just a toothbrush and some time, i have tape that I have been meaning to try, but that would require cleaning the rim (which I have done once and probably wont ever do again)

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17 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

The LBS comment is interesting, my TT bike (actual a Felt AR aero road bike, with clip ons) is in getting its pre IMNZ rebuild, and I said to the staff not to re-glue/worry about tubulars as i would re-glue myself; then it is only me cursing myself if I puncture and need to change a tubular. They laughed and agreed.

No PHD required just a toothbrush and some time, i have tape that I have been meaning to try, but that would require cleaning the rim (which I have done once and probably wont ever do again)

I once had a guy ring me out of the blue, telling me that the blokes at the local bike shop had given him my number as they had no one who could glue tubular and they recommended he come to me.  :lol: 

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I'm surprised more peeps don't use tape. Supposedly marginally more CCR, but it would be negligible. I started on tape, now glue. Happy to use either. Loads of myths knocking around about tubs, probably the reason why they aren't popular.

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On 17/02/2021 at 6:20 AM, BogFrog said:

Thanks for all the replies.  Apparently he has been running his tyres at 100 for the last 6 months....  His last tyre was bought in a shop and was the conti gp5000.  The tyre lasted 6-8 weeks before he had to replace it - had holes throughout. 

We've moved to Canberra from Sydney and while the riding here is much much better, the punctures are about 4 times more common.  This means I've had 3 in 15months and he has given up count...  there are very few road sweepers here...

He tried gatorskins in the past and wasn't impressed.  He went to 99bikes and they recommended the Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR Folding Road Tyre which is he trying on the back...

Welcome to the land of Bogan Diamonds.
A few years ago, a few WT cyclists visited, and made the comment that there was more glass and crap on the roads here than nearly anywhere else they had ever visited.

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On 17/02/2021 at 6:20 AM, BogFrog said:

Thanks for all the replies.  Apparently he has been running his tyres at 100 for the last 6 months....  His last tyre was bought in a shop and was the conti gp5000.  The tyre lasted 6-8 weeks before he had to replace it - had holes throughout. 

We've moved to Canberra from Sydney and while the riding here is much much better, the punctures are about 4 times more common.  This means I've had 3 in 15months and he has given up count...  there are very few road sweepers here...

He tried gatorskins in the past and wasn't impressed.  He went to 99bikes and they recommended the Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR Folding Road Tyre which is he trying on the back...

10 years riding in Canberra and I've maybe flatted once or twice. But I'm very careful where I put my wheels 🙂

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