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Age versus time in the sport


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So I was thinking...after years of use things wear out, peoples knees and hips get shot...that's life. But in the age group say 40-50 who is the best situated to reach peak performance. The bloke who has been doing triathlons for 25+ years and has the engine and experience though the miles are starting to take their toll....or the newb late starter who has only been at it for a few years so has plenty of miles left in the tank, has fresh knees and hips and a zest for training and getting stuck into it?

Is there a point of equilibrium where years of conditioning are outweighed by a relatively fresh body and enthusiasm? Or does it not work like that at all? 

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The other factors are expendable income and time to train. Someone in that 40-50 age group is on the tail end of child dependence and can sink more time into their training, as well as a bit more cash as the kids get older and start to fund their own lives.

To answer your question though, time in the sport wins out, as someone new to the sport is going to need a pretty big aerobic base to waltz in and smash out a competitive Ironman or 70.3. 

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It'd be the bloke who has looked after himself consistently through regular strengthening, stretching and massage

Unfortunately I am not that bloke  😟

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Guest Jim Shortz
37 minutes ago, IronJimbo said:

It'd be the bloke who has looked after himself consistently through regular strengthening, stretching and massage

Unfortunately I am not that bloke  😟

Regular massage and strength definitely. Especially over 35yrs 

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1 hour ago, BNothling said:

The other factors are expendable income and time to train. Someone in that 40-50 age group is on the tail end of child dependence and can sink more time into their training, as well as a bit more cash as the kids get older and start to fund their own lives.

 

hmmm, I missed that memo. 😁

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Genetics wins out.

To be fast you have to have the genetic to push yourself, recover well, avoid injury.

Then i think it is ability to train, me I’m broken so won’t go fast, and been in the endurance sport 30 years, 14 in triathlon. So a in my sample of 1 someone coming into the sport may well go faster as less accumulated injury and body wearing out.

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10 hours ago, more said:

So I was thinking...after years of use things wear out, peoples knees and hips get shot...that's life. But in the age group say 40-50 who is the best situated to reach peak performance. The bloke who has been doing triathlons for 25+ years and the miles are starting to take their toll....or the late starter who has only been at it for a few years so has plenty of miles left in the tank, has fresh knees and hips and a zest for training and getting stuck into it?

Is there a point of equilibrium where years of conditioning are outweighed by a relatively fresh body and enthusiasm? Or does it not work like that at all? 

Its generally the guy who work his but off that does the best and those who have the time to do that.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 14/10/2020 at 2:09 PM, BNothling said:

The other factors are expendable income and time to train. Someone in that 40-50 age group is on the tail end of child dependence and can sink more time into their training, as well as a bit more cash as the kids get older and start to fund their own lives.

To answer your question though, time in the sport wins out, as someone new to the sport is going to need a pretty big aerobic base to waltz in and smash out a competitive Ironman or 70.3. 

Will you help me out with a gofundme page to assist with impending high school fees for my kids?

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IMO someone new to the sport would be in the box seat,  but with a background of an elite level at another endurance sport. One with low impact such as cycling. I’ve noticed a few ex pro cyclists have done well at Ironman over the years.

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