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Minimum distance passing laws for Victoria - they are coming.


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https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/safer-cycling-and-more-routes-keep-melbourne-moving 

 

The Victorian Government will create jobs and make it easier and safer for people riding bikes to get around Melbourne as we head towards COVIDNormal.

Minister for Roads and Road Safety Ben Carroll today announced 100 kilometers of new and improved cycling routes will be delivered across key inner-Melbourne suburbs to make it easier and safer for people cycling to and from the CBD.

With more people expected to use cars to get around, this $13 million investment will deliver pop-up lanes to help relieve congestion and provide an alternative to public transport for those living closer to the CBD.

Works will be delivered in the coming months and provide a boost to our economy, creating and supporting over 40 local jobs.

Planning for the routes is underway with signage, road markings and barriers used to create the pop-up improvements to cycle lanes, off-road paths and crossing points. The changes will improve travel options from inner-Melbourne areas such as Footscray, Northcote and St Kilda.

Local councils and community representatives will be consulted as the pop-up cycling routes are developed, ensuring they best fit local needs.

Victoria will also introduce mandatory minimum passing distances next year – improving cyclist safety and ensuring passing distance rules clear and consistent across state lines for all road users.

When introduced in 2021, the regulatory change would make it mandatory for motorists to give cyclists at least one metre clearance when overtaking on roads with speed limits up to 60km/h, and 1.5 metres on roads with speed limits above 60km/h.

Across Victoria, the $100 million TAC Safer Cyclists and Pedestrian Fund is also delivering 44 walking and cycling projects, in addition to more than 250 kilometres of cycling and walking paths in delivery, or committed for future delivery, as part of the government's major transport infrastructure program. 

 

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It was described on one of the news sites as "Victoria introduces controversial new cyclist road rule". When every other State in Australia has introduced it, I am not sure you can describe it as controversial. 

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It's a great clickbait topic for shitrags to publish content on to get engagement from their anti-cyclist viewership. The Ballarat Courier plays this card often....  I had a massive slab of smackdown ready to unleash on a Karen yesterday that I hit delete on before hitting enter. 

I saved some of it for another day. It'll come in handy. Some below: 

Here's what I pay for the privilege of being both a motorist and cyclist: 

- Car registration. 
- Vehicle license. 
- Car insurance. 
- RACV membership. 
- Cycling Australia license. 
- Australian Vets Cycling license.
- Bicycle Victoria membership.
- Bicycle insurance (as part of home/contents/etc)

All of these are paid regardless if I choose to drive my car or ride my bike. Should I choose to drive, I'm paying fuel taxes too. The fact is I pay MORE than the average motorist for my road usage. Most cyclists do. Paying more doesn't give me the right to claim more of the road either. 

 

 

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Never mind the dumb arses, they are just small people on the bottom of the scrap heap looking for someone lower and they think cyclists are it.

Besides I don't particularly care for the "I pay my taxes' argument. The law says we can ride on the road and that's that. I don't pay fees/duties/taxes to ride on the road because my bike causes no damage unlike pedestrians that have dedicated infrastructure and also pay none.

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During our short lock down in WA there were a lot more people out walking and cycling, the bike shops were empty. Gradually the number of walkers and cyclists dropped off. 

Has there been a surge of walking and cycling during the lock down in Melbourne?

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15 minutes ago, Ironnerd said:

During our short lock down in WA there were a lot more people out walking and cycling, the bike shops were empty. Gradually the number of walkers and cyclists dropped off. 

Has there been a surge of walking and cycling during the lock down in Melbourne?

Still a lot of both in my area.  
 

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A problem with these laws is: (well from my perspective up here in sunny Qld)  it looks like it will take at least two decades to change police attitudes and court culture so that they are actually enforced.....

In the mean time you get the privilege of being right and dead at the same time.....

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41 minutes ago, trifun said:

A problem with these laws is: (well from my perspective up here in sunny Qld)  it looks like it will take at least two decades to change police attitudes and court culture so that they are actually enforced.....

In the mean time you get the privilege of being right and dead at the same time.....

When do you plant a tree? 
 

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6 hours ago, Ironnerd said:

During our short lock down in WA there were a lot more people out walking and cycling, the bike shops were empty. Gradually the number of walkers and cyclists dropped off. 

Has there been a surge of walking and cycling during the lock down in Melbourne?

Never seen so many people cycling on bike paths around my area and walking/running in the park next door

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