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Adam Hansen Full Time Ironman


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The 2020 season will be Adam Hansen’s final year as a full-time WorldTour rider with the Australian revealing on the Cyclingnewspodcast that he will concentrate on Ironman races next season. 

The 39-year-old has been racing at WorldTour level since 2007 and has enjoyed a career that included stage wins in both the Giro d’Italia and the Vuelta a Espana. 

Hansen also set a record by completing 20 Grand Tours in a row between 2011and 2018 but with his current deal at Lotto Soudal ending this year and the need for a new challenge, he has decided to concentrate on an entirely different challenge.

“I’m going to change sports,” Hansen announced in the latest Cyclingnewspodcast.

“I’m going to get into Ironman next year. You are the first to hear about this actually. I did one last year and I’ve always wanted to go into Ironman after cycling, so it’s always something that I wanted to do but I’ve enjoyed cycling so much that I kept continuing but as I’m getting older I know that I’m running out of years. 

"I did Ironman Florida last year for the experience and I really enjoyed it. I was considering making the switch this year but I did another year (of road racing) but this was always in the works and around March I made the final decision.” 

 

There is still a slim hope of Hansen remaining within cycling if he can find a team that will accommodate his Ironman schedule and road racing but if that doesn’t happen then he will throw himself into a new world with complete commitment.
 

The Giro d’Italia could be his final race at the WorldTour.

“If can find a team as Cam Wurf did and maybe have a programme, maybe that’s an option but if not then it’s going to be 100 per cent around Ironman," Hansen explained. 

 

"I do Ironman Portugal on November 7 to give me another touch of it, so after the Giro, I’ve basically got two weeks to do some running and swimming. I’ll be racing in the pro category but I won’t be taking it too seriously."

Competing in an Ironman last year took Hansen outside of his comfort zone and showed him that racing in a new sport could be both challenging and reinvigorating. 

 

He has spent the majority of his cycling career riding in the services of others and his departure will leave a huge hole in the sport, especially when it comes to his knowledge and stature as one of the most respected riders in the peloton. However, he’s ready for a new environment.

“I’m really looking forward to choosing the races that I want to do and not doing races that I don’t want to do. I’ll spend more time at home and I really love training, I really love it, so it’s a new thing and I’m really excited about getting into it. I think this will really suit a rider like me, a workhorse who can work on the front all day. That’s what an Ironman athlete really does,” he said.

 

“I really want to go to the World Championships. I’ve got really high expectations of myself and I hope to do at least three to four seasons. It’s going to be full-on. It’s something that I’m excited about and that helps when it comes to saying goodbye to cycling. On the other side, I’ll still be riding my bike and being dedicated and serious. I have a lot of friends in the peloton. 

 

"I’ve done cycling for a number of years and you do the same races over and over but when I did Ironman Florida last year I was nervous before the start and in cycling a lot of riders miss this because when you’ve got a role you’re helping out you lose the aspect of your racing. When I was on the start line at Ironman it was on me.”

 

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1 hour ago, roxii said:

Would love to see Hansen’s bike setup given there are no restrictions. 

I’m am sure someone with break down every detail of his bike in 5 weeks. 

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On 03/10/2020 at 5:58 PM, BarryBevan said:

faster than wurf was early on

Faster at what? Triathlon? Cycling? Or olympic rowing?

Cam only took up cycling after 24, and was a bit of a gladfly - never really finding the right team or niche in the peloton before he really gave it away 7 years ago. He never really found his stride in Ironman racing until 2017 aged 34 either. 2013 to 2016 was spent largely faffing about. Becoming Froome and Thomas’s training bitch under the eye of his junior rowing coach (then Team Sky head coach) gave him the focus that he’d lost over the previous decade (although he was still a bit of gad fly - dabbling with a rowing comeback and also an Olympic triathlon tilt, lol).
 

Hanson has an extremely impressive palmares as a cyclist with a 14 year career behind him. And I hear he he was quick as a junior triathlete. Although perhaps not Richie Porte quick. 
 

Cam certainly has made up for a decade of drift post rowing in the last 3-4 years and has been a trail blazer in his approach to Ironman a racing and now fully blending an elite Ironman career with pro cycling, although I doubt he’ll get another pro cycling contract next season, he’s likely to continue under the Ineous banner as an associate athlete-triathlete for another 2-3 years.

Adam is 39 now, he’s done everything he can in Procycling and hopefully made enough coin to set himself up for the rest of his life. Probably the wrong side of 35 to make the switch, but the next 2-3 years should be fun to watch. 

in two years, I’d love to see Cam, Adam, Richie, Froome and Thomas toe the line in Kona. It’s actually a possibility. 

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7 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

The best runner wins

When Adam is running at or below 2:50, get back to me.
 

whilst Wurf is ‘big’ for a triathlete at around 71kg, but Hansen is a monster at 77kg ... that, and age is likely to be the limiting factor. 

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10 minutes ago, Andrew #1 said:

When Adam is running at or below 2:50, get back to me.
 

whilst Wurf is ‘big’ for a triathlete at around 71kg, but Hansen is a monster at 77kg ... that, and age is likely to be the limiting factor. 

You have a man crush on Wurf and just moved the goal posts to the question you set.

faster than wurf was early on

Faster at what?

I gave you their debut Ironman, where Hansen ran 26 mins faster than Wurf after throwing down a 415 bike.

Wurf is 37, that is getting to the very end if not the end for winning Kona as a pro. Given Brownlees intent and good chance Patrick Lange comes back and probably one more shot from Frodeno, which all points to a 240 run.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, BarryBevan said:

You have a man crush on Wurf and just moved the goal posts to the question you set.

faster than wurf was early on

Faster at what?

I gave you their debut Ironman, where Hansen ran 26 mins faster than Wurf after throwing down a 415 bike.

Wurf is 37, that is getting to the very end if not the end for winning Kona as a pro. Given Brownlees intent and good chance Patrick Lange comes back and probably one more shot from Frodeno, which all points to a 240 run.

 

 

 

Yes yes, but Wurf now has 4 years running in the legs. That’s banked already. Hanson doesn’t. And he turns 40 in May.

Wurf May never be able to beat the likes of Frodono at their best, but he’s very close already. He won two Ironman races last year, ran 2:50 or better in three and finished a fairly strong 5th in what was a pretty ordinary day out for him in Kona. That’s a pretty high benchmark for Hanson to match.

So the big question is how close Hanson can get to Cameron’s record over the next 2-3 years. I mean - good luck to him, but he’s starting a little late. That said, Lance Armstrong only took 6 months to develop at 70.3 before he was making the likes of Greg Bennett look ordinary at age 41, so who knows. 

While Wurf versus Hanson is interesting, what I’d really like see is Richie Porte give Ironman a red hot go from 2022. Maybe Ineous will extend him the same latitude - as it currently does Wurf - in the twilight of his cycling career. 

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7 minutes ago, Peter said:

Hanson isn’t in the same league as wurf.  

No yet. 2 years time? Maybe, but 39 - nearly 40, is old to start what would be a steep development curve. 

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The game has changed in the last few years with the likes of AB, Frodo etc who are all great swimmers, great bikers and great runners. As evidenced by Lionel's struggle last year to get back to the front, if you're not with the lead swim pack, it's pretty much all over. You can't give up 6, 7 minutes on the swim and expect to make it back on the bike. And even if someone could they would still need to lay down a 2.40 marathon.

Wurf, Lionel etc are improving with their swim and run, but these guys aren't going to start swimming 46mins and running sub 2.40. I really hope both of them podium at Kona in some point in their careers, but it would have to be a year where the big guns are out due to retirement, injury etc 

 

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8 minutes ago, zed said:

The game has changed in the last few years with the likes of AB, Frodo etc who are all great swimmers, great bikers and great runners. As evidenced by Lionel's struggle last year to get back to the front, if you're not with the lead swim pack, it's pretty much all over. You can't give up 6, 7 minutes on the swim and expect to make it back on the bike. And even if someone could they would still need to lay down a 2.40 marathon.

Wurf, Lionel etc are improving with their swim and run, but these guys aren't going to start swimming 46mins and running sub 2.40. I really hope both of them podium at Kona in some point in their careers, but it would have to be a year where the big guns are out due to retirement, injury etc 

 

This.

People can be fan boys all they want and IM lends itself to this. The ST folk used to want Lieto to win it off the bike, then they wanted Lionel and we want Wurf.

Those guys were just not a chance for all the reasons Zed put up. If Wurf et al improve their swims and they won't be able to match AB. Then AB and JF just wind it up some more. Jan Frodeno can bike with anyone he chooses to, he is so much better than anyone else at just doing what is needed, he is more aero, he executes perfectly rather than racing on emotion and what he wants to do. Thus his bike VI is amazing.

If AB decides he wants Kona and I think he will as the Olympics well he won't win, then can't see anyone stopping him.

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There is more to ironman than winning Kona. 
 

Some of the absolute best in the sport have never won kona. 
 

but this is about Hansen. He won’t even win a backward ironman in the middle of nowhere. 
 

he won’t even win busso or port or cairns.  
 

Wurf has 

then again, I’m just a Wurf fanboy apparently. 

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2 hours ago, Peter said:

There is more to ironman than winning Kona. 
 

Some of the absolute best in the sport have never won kona. 
 

but this is about Hansen. He won’t even win a backward ironman in the middle of nowhere. 
 

he won’t even win busso or port or cairns.  
 

Wurf has 

then again, I’m just a Wurf fanboy apparently. 

I'm a Lionel and Wurf fanboy, they are both great for the sport. I guess the focus of Kona is because they are the World Champs. But as you pointed out earlier, it's a shame that it is only once race as it only suits triathletes with a certain skillset e.g ability to cope with the heat.

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6 hours ago, zed said:

The game has changed in the last few years with the likes of AB, Frodo etc who are all great swimmers, great bikers and great runners. As evidenced by Lionel's struggle last year to get back to the front, if you're not with the lead swim pack, it's pretty much all over. You can't give up 6, 7 minutes on the swim and expect to make it back on the bike. And even if someone could they would still need to lay down a 2.40 marathon.

I don’t think Lionel’s struggles are great evidence of the point you are making. They are great evidence of Lionel’s issues. 

I think the real game changer was Mecca’s successful race strategy in 2010: the race could be won on the bike by breaking the peloton, or at least making everybody work and not just sit in.

From that point on it was only a matter of time before folk realised that there was real benefit in chasing marginal gains in the swim. Now, instead of one big pack there is a consistent Amberger-ITU small selection that gaps the main first bunch by a good 90 seconds to 3 minutes. 

So we are talking evolution, not revolution. Wurf has actually been an important part of that evolution. However, at the same time his own race has evolved. I don’t think we can actually read too much into his personal result from last year. Was he cooked from IM Italy and the travel thereafter? He felt flat the whole day, but that could simply be a manifestation of the pressure that Frodo put him under. While we don’t know for sure I think he’s got enough improvement left in him to make the front of the first big pack (he’s already made the back of it for the last two years) which should leave him only 90 seconds down on the small selection. I also think his year in the peloton will make him even stronger on the bike next year. I reckon its entirely feasible that he can catch then gap the Frodo bunch by 5 minutes next year. That leaves the run. A couple of years ago I thought at a 2;52 was about as fast as he could run in Kona. I now actually think he is capable of around 2:45. Now for all the talk of a 2:40 marathon only Lange and Jacobs (just about) have done that since Mark Allen and LVL’s days. The winning benchmark up until 2017 was between 2:42 (Macca in 2007) and 2:48. Even Frodo On his best ever day is still a 2:43 guy in Kona. If Wurf gets off the bike with 5 minutes in hand and runs 2:45 then it will take something very special - even from a Brownlee, Gomez or Frodo to actually beat him ... 

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1 hour ago, Andrew #1 said:

I don’t think Lionel’s struggles are great evidence of the point you are making. They are great evidence of Lionel’s issues. 

I think the real game changer was Mecca’s successful race strategy in 2010: the race could be won on the bike by breaking the peloton, or at least making everybody work and not just sit in.

From that point on it was only a matter of time before folk realised that there was real benefit in chasing marginal gains in the swim. Now, instead of one big pack there is a consistent Amberger-ITU small selection that gaps the main first bunch by a good 90 seconds to 3 minutes. 

So we are talking evolution, not revolution. Wurf has actually been an important part of that evolution. However, at the same time his own race has evolved. I don’t think we can actually read too much into his personal result from last year. Was he cooked from IM Italy and the travel thereafter? He felt flat the whole day, but that could simply be a manifestation of the pressure that Frodo put him under. While we don’t know for sure I think he’s got enough improvement left in him to make the front of the first big pack (he’s already made the back of it for the last two years) which should leave him only 90 seconds down on the small selection. I also think his year in the peloton will make him even stronger on the bike next year. I reckon its entirely feasible that he can catch then gap the Frodo bunch by 5 minutes next year. That leaves the run. A couple of years ago I thought at a 2;52 was about as fast as he could run in Kona. I now actually think he is capable of around 2:45. Now for all the talk of a 2:40 marathon only Lange and Jacobs (just about) have done that since Mark Allen and LVL’s days. The winning benchmark up until 2017 was between 2:42 (Macca in 2007) and 2:48. Even Frodo On his best ever day is still a 2:43 guy in Kona. If Wurf gets off the bike with 5 minutes in hand and runs 2:45 then it will take something very special - even from a Brownlee, Gomez or Frodo to actually beat him ... 

Macca didn't evolve the race, he just raced better that day. For all the talk of winning on the bike outside of Norman Stadler on that day and Hellreigel in 97, its the best excution which is not nailing it on the bike. Macca ran 243 the year in 2010 and 2007 he ran 242.

Frodeno just does what he has to do, he swims front pack because he van conserve some energy and he watches the bike doing what he has to do. fordeno swims 5 minutes faster than Wurf and he gets to swim of better feet.

Wurf didn't gte off the bike with that in hand because Jan controlling the race biked 416 less than 2 minutes slower than Wurf, who is supposed to be destroying everyone on the bike.

Frodenon then laid down a 242, that is 13 minutes faster than Wurf.

So even if the optimistic scenario you paint above Wurf with 5 minutes in hand at T2 which he won't have as Frodeno is too good as is AB, needs 5 minutes advantage and some how he runs 245 when he actually ran 13 minutes slower.

Wurf is great, and good for the sport but how is any of this going to happen when it's a race being dictated to him. At Port where he killed it and did 250 he was dictating the pacing at Kona he is chasing from the get go and burning matches to make it up and then bridge and gap.

He is a brilliant athlete but feel he might have left the transition a bit too late to get that swim where it needed to be

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I’ve been reading your sandbagging of Wurf for the past 3 years BB. You’ve been basically wrong the whole way through. Whereas he’s actually performed at or exceeded my expectations along the way. Last year he was 12 minutes behind Frodo. The year before he was 25 minutes behind Lange. The year before that, 37 minutes. I think he’s got another 10 minute progression in him on the run before he gets too old to make the big gains. I also reckon he’d lost a couple of points on the bike last year chasing back to back 100km+ running weeks since February. That won’t be the case next year. Cam also lost 6 weeks swim training because he cracked his ribs the week before Nice. I just think he’s got enough, and is still young enough to that it to the next and final level.

And another thing: if you speak to any pro triathlete - they’ll point to 2010 as the turning point: no longer was it ‘Uber bikers’ who went off the front: all round triathletes had to do it. Even Crowie had to revolutionise his approach thereafter. 

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12 minutes ago, Andrew #1 said:

I’ve been reading your sandbagging of Wurf for the past 3 years BB. You’ve been basically wrong the whole way through. Whereas he’s actually performed at or exceeded my expectations along the way. Last year he was 12 minutes behind Frodo. The year before he was 25 minutes behind Lange. The year before that, 37 minutes. I think he’s got another 10 minute progression in him on the run before he gets too old to make the big gains. I also reckon he’d lost a couple of points on the bike last year chasing back to back 100km+ running weeks since February. That won’t be the case next year. Cam also lost 6 weeks swim training because he cracked his ribs the week before Nice. I just think he’s got enough, and is still young enough to that it to the next and final level.

And another thing: if you speak to any pro triathlete - they’ll point to 2010 as the turning point: no longer was it ‘Uber bikers’ who went off the front: all round triathletes had to do it. Even Crowie had to revolutionise his approach thereafter. 

You want it to be true so you will say anything. Speak to pros and elite coaches sure everyone has a view and there are some who will support your POV and some mine.

the ones who support mine are those who win not those who would have won or will win if everything goes right for them.

your analysis is a bit like saying the guy who ran 11 seconds for 100 is gunna beat bolt for 100 some time because he got his time to 9.99.

The best run wins Kona please explain how Lange won Kona I’d it’s fundamentally shifted to the bike.

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I cant handle another Pro’s who equally annoys me, as well as love them. Any interview with Adam is like any interview or reflection with Lionel Sanders. He thinks way too deeply about everything.

I hope he has the right people from the start and listens to them from start to finish. 

 

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“Bike for show, run for dough” has been one of the mantras of Ironman racing, especially in Kona. There have been very few occasions where a superb performance on the bike has secured a Kona title; almost all races have been decided by the athlete with the best marathon. https://triathlonmagazine.ca/racing/how-to-win-the-ironman-world-championship-the-best-kona-run-strategy/

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12 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

Since 2104 the mens winner at Kona was the owner of the fastest run of the day

I won’t be around to say you are wrong. 
so I’ll say it now.

you are wrong 

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31 minutes ago, Peter said:

I won’t be around to say you are wrong. 
so I’ll say it now.

you are wrong 

Okay Pete its a typo but the data is true since 2014 fastest run wins, you can argue the earth is flat all you want but thats what actually happened.

Now maybe we get an outlier year or Wurf can be as good on the bike as Norman. Norman was 31 and 33 when he did his uber biker thing. 2021 should be the best chance for a wild card with no racing and people perhaps losing motivation while others get the work done. https://www.ironman.com/im-world-championship-results

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Since 2017 the fastest run has belonged to the winner. 

2014 - Kienle won. I’m fairly sure he didn’t have the fastest run that day.

From memory: 2015 - Frodo’s first win. Pretty sure He didn’t t have the fastest run split that day. Not sure about his win in 2016 either.

the ‘bike for show, run for dough’ tag goes back to the days of the Kona peloton - where nearly everyone sat in the same bunch that would meander along for a 4:40 bike split before the fastest runner would win. That has all changed now.

Before 2010 there were a few aberrations - LVL and Hellreigel getting away in 1996, Norman in 2004 and 2006. Arguably Faris in 2005, but the performance that changed everything was Macca’s in 2010. He wasn’t a pure Uber biker - but an all around athlete from an ITU background. He showed what could be done to ‘the runners’ and it changed the equation irrevocably that day. The proof of that was the way that Crowie totally reinvented his strategy and preparation for the following year. 

I’m not undermining the importance of the run, but the old adage that the race only starts on the run up Palani simply isn’t true anymore: it starts from the gun (which I think is actually the point you are trying to make BB).

My point re: Wurf is simply that if he keeps his swim loses to the marginal (he’s already a 51 minute non west suit swimmer in Kona, so getting out in the first half dozen in the main pack in say 49 even should be doable) and puts down his best performance on the Queen K, then he would have a real shot at the win with a 2:45 run split. Moreover I can see the run progression that makes that an actual real prospect. 

Anyway, we have wandered a long way from your comments about Hansen, vis: 

On 03/10/2020 at 5:58 PM, BarryBevan said:

faster than wurf was early on

which  you confirmed related to a straight comparison between their first Ironman races. 

Frankly, such comparisons are really silly. Both were effectively doing their first Ironman for shits and giggles. Wurf didn’t get serious until 2016.

Let’s see how Adam goes in his first Ironman on a full preparation and compare that to Wurf’s first completed race as a pro in 2016 (he had some injuries and withdrawals in 2016, so I’m not actually sure which race that was. Maybe South Africa or Cairns).

Then lets see Adam’s progression next year as against what Wurf did in 2017. 

Then let’s talk. 

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17 hours ago, BarryBevan said:

Okay Pete its a typo but the data is true since 2014 fastest run wins, you can argue the earth is flat all you want but thats what actually happened.

Well you are wrong. Again. 
 

2015.

Jan won. 2:52 marathon 

raelert second  ran a 2:50 marathon  

2016 

jan won  2:45 marathon 

Lange came 3rd  ran a 2:39 marathon 

im not even looking further  

you just made it up   Pathetic really  

 

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18 minutes ago, Andrew #1 said:

Since 2017 the fastest run has belonged to the winner. 

2014 - Kienle won. I’m fairly sure he didn’t have the fastest run that day.

From memory: 2015 - Frodo’s first win. Pretty sure He didn’t t have the fastest run split that day. Not sure about his win in 2016 either.

the ‘bike for show, run for dough’ tag goes back to the days of the Kona peloton - where nearly everyone sat in the same bunch that would meander along for a 4:40 bike split before the fastest runner would win. That has all changed now.

Before 2010 there were a few aberrations - LVL and Hellreigel getting away in 1996, Norman in 2004 and 2006. Arguably Faris in 2005, but the performance that changed everything was Macca’s in 2010. He wasn’t a pure Uber biker - but an all around athlete from an ITU background. He showed what could be done to ‘the runners’ and it changed the equation irrevocably that day. The proof of that was the way that Crowie totally reinvented his strategy and preparation for the following year. 

I’m not undermining the importance of the run, but the old adage that the race only starts on the run up Palani simply isn’t true anymore: it starts from the gun (which I think is actually the point you are trying to make BB).

My point re: Wurf is simply that if he keeps his swim loses to the marginal (he’s already a 51 minute non west suit swimmer in Kona, so getting out in the first half dozen in the main pack in say 49 even should be doable) and puts down his best performance on the Queen K, then he would have a real shot at the win with a 2:45 run split. Moreover I can see the run progression that makes that an actual real prospect. 

Anyway, we have wandered a long way from your comments about Hansen, vis: 

which  you confirmed related to a straight comparison between their first Ironman races. 

Frankly, such comparisons are really silly. Both were effectively doing their first Ironman for shits and giggles. Wurf didn’t get serious until 2016.

Let’s see how Adam goes in his first Ironman on a full preparation and compare that to Wurf’s first completed race as a pro in 2016 (he had some injuries and withdrawals in 2016, so I’m not actually sure which race that was. Maybe South Africa or Cairns).

Then lets see Adam’s progression next year as against what Wurf did in 2017. 

Then let’s talk. 

Yes I read the table wrong, which for some reason ranks them number 1 in the run just because they won the overall event.

Having said that the winner doesn't just jog to the finish. Ignoring the personal jibe from other post, I agree with you that the bike is more important, though it's less uber bike and try and hang on alla Sinballe, Lieto et al and more use it to manage the race.

Frodeno has had such a huge impact on the race as he really has no weakness compared to anyone. Last year I think he was throwing it down to everyone saying I am the best here it is.

Regards Wurf v hansen, only pointed out his first IM was a bit better than Cams, but at 39 he will be just making up numbers in the pros as he does not have enough time to get probably even low 3 marathon. Richie Porte could be fun for the sport.

Wurf has been very very good, his IM Oz performance was breathtaking. Lionel, Wurf and I guess Porte if he comes across will all have to find a way to deal with the swim challenge presented by ex ITU types especially if Brownlee decided this is his thing. 

Re Macca he ran pretty bloody fast, he also bikes and swims really fast too

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22 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

Having said that the winner doesn't just jog to the finish.

Nobody said it was. FFS (although Norman was just just jogging and giving random high fives back in 2004 he was that far ahead doing up the final hill into town).

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24 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

Re Macca he ran pretty bloody fast, he also bikes and swims really fast too

So now we are just shouting the same points at each other. WTF?

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35 minutes ago, Notsofast said:

This has been quiet a good discussion. Not sure why the last comment was needed??

NSF

Because he did. Again 

 

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25 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

Richie Porte could be fun for the sport.

Richie is the one guy (at least since Armstrong) that I’ve long felt has the best chance to transition from pro cycling to pro Ironman and win Kona.

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39 minutes ago, Andrew #1 said:

Richie is the one guy (at least since Armstrong) that I’ve long felt has the best chance to transition from pro cycling to pro Ironman and win Kona.

It would be interesting given  swim and tri background. Figure he has to committ early to give run the time.

frodeno window ending so there is a chance

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47 minutes ago, Andrew #1 said:

Richie is the one guy (at least since Armstrong) that I’ve long felt has the best chance to transition from pro cycling to pro Ironman and win Kona.

Agree. Richie would be very interesting. 
 

how long is his new contract for with ineos?

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OKay...Ill say it..... Whilst your points are both good. I think BB's point is a win in Kona still takes one of the best runs of the days. May not be the fastest but pretty fast.

Apart from which I don't know why you are both pushing Wurf or Hansen....They will never win Kona....not unless they are already there and the rest of the field can't enter Hawaii.

I reckon the field as Andrew #1 points out will be 'on' from the start, hence they know who they need to leave behind on the swim and they know who needs to be left behind when the run starts.

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Guest Jim Shortz

Agree with IF 

 

Hawaii will be flat out, balls out racing for their livelihoods. Even more so than usual. Wouldn't be surprised if the guys and gals outside the top 10 pick up their sponsors merch at Special Needs and throw it out to fans... Gotta keep the sponsors happy 🤷🏻‍♂️👍

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https://endurance.biz/2020/industry-news/kona-postponed-ironman-world-championships-shifted-to-early-2021/

Is this still happening? If there was ever to be an outlier year then this would be the year

https://www.tri247.com/triathlon-news/event-news/2020-ironman-champs-cancelled

Answered, so no. Oh well back to hypotheticals and zwift until we get real racing

Edited by BarryBevan
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This one is better than the Ironman site:

https://www.slowtwitch.com/News/Top_Ironman_Hawaii_Finishers_Archive_58.html

kienle in 14 did gap them on the bike and hold on with a good marathon

Macca while running fast did make Crowie change from biking 437 so agree Andrew he did change the way the race was excuted.

Norman in 04 and 06 is just bike hero awesomeness

Looking at the names and bike splits was 97 a high wind year?

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2 hours ago, Peter said:

Agree. Richie would be very interesting. 
 

how long is his new contract for with ineos?

Well our favourite twits poster has spelled it out...Richie wouldn't be that great in an IM bike because he is too small & is only really good at 20 minute efforts 🙄

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2 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

I think BB's point is a win in Kona still takes one of the best runs of the days. May not be the fastest but pretty fast.

No. That’s how his argument shape shifted. 
 

Last year I thought that Wurf could win with a 2:50 run. No more. I think he’d need a 2:45 and a good lead off the bike. One of the fastest, if not the fastest, runs on the day. 
 

And yes, I don’t think it’s a mere pipe dream that he could win Kona next year or 2022. The progression and the talent are both there.

Edited by Andrew #1
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