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Long Run - Food and Water


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What are you all doing to carry food and water when running?

I am at about the 90 minute mark currently but I can feel that to go much further I at least need water.  I prefer running on trails (until I am not allowed to!) so no public water availability.

Some food might be needed down the track too!

 

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I wear a salomon running vest, super comfy but pretty expensive. I went to a store and tried a few on on, I had wanted an ultimate direction as they have good reviews but the salomon fit me better.

I generally just use a tailwind mix so no food but always have a couple of gels in the back pack

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12 minutes ago, The new guy said:

I’m putting it on a table next to the treadmill .

 

#stayinside 😂

Yep, all mid week runs are on the treadmill, not sure I can do that long on a treadmill though! 

 

On my trail run last week I saw about 6 people in 90 minutes.  Week before I didn't see anybody.  This whole social distancing thing is  making people get out of town :)

 

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52 minutes ago, Toolish said:

On my trail run last week I saw about 6 people in 90 minutes.  Week before I didn't see anybody.  This whole social distancing thing is  making people get out of town :)

A couple years ago I'd do early morning trail runs through Bunya Forest only 15km from Brisbane CBD, and usually only see a couple of mountain bikers. I imagine it'd be busier now if it's not closed.

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Yep.

 

Whats got me pissed about this social distancing thing is that the overwhelming aim of our current regulations is that we should be spending as little time as possible in social situations. Stay at home if you can. Only travel for work/food etc etc. If I look at my facebook feed there is this ridiculous groundswell of people who all of a sudden think they cant survive without heading outside to the park or for a walk every day. They havent goen for a walk for 5 years, but now that there is a directive to limit exposure, everyone is looking for any loophole to get outside.

Dont get me wrong, I hope it lasts after the restrictions, but its a bloody odd time for everyone to suddenly become the 'outdoors type'.

 

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I'm more of a fan of the older style camelbak's rather than the new ones with pockets on front

Bladder on back and gel's in hip pockets

I saying that haven't really used a new style one

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16 minutes ago, The new guy said:

people who all of a sudden think they cant survive without heading outside to the park or for a walk every day. They havent goen for a walk for 5 years,

Agree. I think the allowed out for exercise should be restricted only to those that can prove they were exercising outdoors regularly prior to COVID.

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Yes, used to do regular runs prior to all this.  I leave my house on foot and don't get within 50 metres of another house, can easily run a marathon distance with hills or flat

I'm an older style bladder in the backpack type of guy as well.  Tried a few, found the Denali brand at Amazon for around $40 did the job.  Not a fan of the vest styles either or having to deal with tiny water bottles - just pick up the straw and suck, nothing else to think about - no trying to put the top back down, no stumbling to get the bottle back in the holder without breaking stride etc.  I never go anymore food wise than a gel or banana, usually put these on the side pockets, and my gorilla arms generally can get them

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With the new vest with the soft bottles on the front there is no real stuffing around with lids or putting the bottle back in the holder. Just a slight lift and squeeze of the bottle, no break in stride and no sloshing. With the 2 bottle on the front, 500ml in both one for nutrition and one for plain water. You can also use a bladder if you want as there is a pocket for the bladder

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Agree with Limited above.

If you have nutrition in a bladder how do you know how much you've consumed? Of course everyone is different and some like to use gels with water so that doesn't matter in that case.

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I think more people are out due to gyms being closed so that's why you probably are seeing more people walking or running.

So are you saying people should stay home?? People are allowed out to exercise so pull your head in.

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My attitude to this has been to assess what I NEED to do, and what I WANT to do.

I dont NEED to ride outside, because I have a trainer. I dont NEED to run outside, because I have a treadmill. I WANT to do both, and technically am allowed to do both, but by training indoors I am eliminating any risk to myself, bringing anything home, or spreading something I dont know I have. I also understand that there is only a small risk of receiving or transmitting via these examples, but that small risk is easily eliminated by shifting my training indoors. There is a 0% chance of me bringing home covid from my garage, so why not simply take that option.

I NEED to eat, so I shop as quickly as I can, as little as I can. Thats the difference in my eyes, and the lens I have been looking at all my actions through. If you look through a lens of trying to find a way to continue what you are doing, rather than look for ways to limit your risks, you will obviously come to a different outcome.

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For shorter runs I prefer a standard bottle belt. No mucking about with cleaning a bladder.

https://www.runningwarehouse.com.au/Salomon_Active_Hydration_Belt/descpage-SAAHB.html

For longer runs I use a standard Camelbak Octane backpack. Really comfy. Has pockets on the waist belt for gels. Small amount of storage for extra clothing, map, etc on the back. I find that the ones with a proper waist belt do not bounce around as much.

https://camelbak.com.au/shop-by-sport/octane-xct-black-atomic-blue/

I have a brand new, unused Solomon running vest that I bought for the UTA this year😪. It has two flexi bottles on the front and a bladder in the back. It has 12l of storage for all of the mandatory gear you have to carry.

https://salomon.com.au/products/adv-skin-12-set-unisex?variant=31538590318658

rs.php?path=SAAHB-BK-1.jpg

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12 minutes ago, The new guy said:

My attitude to this has been to assess what I NEED to do, and what I WANT to do.

I dont NEED to ride outside, because I have a trainer. I dont NEED to run outside, because I have a treadmill. I WANT to do both, and technically am allowed to do both, but by training indoors I am eliminating any risk to myself, bringing anything home, or spreading something I dont know I have. I also understand that there is only a small risk of receiving or transmitting via these examples, but that small risk is easily eliminated by shifting my training indoors. There is a 0% chance of me bringing home covid from my garage, so why not simply take that option.

I NEED to eat, so I shop as quickly as I can, as little as I can. Thats the difference in my eyes, and the lens I have been looking at all my actions through. If you look through a lens of trying to find a way to continue what you are doing, rather than look for ways to limit your risks, you will obviously come to a different outcome.

I agree with minimising the risk of exposure and it's great if it suits you to train indoors. I've definitely never seen as many people out walking their (very happy) dogs, or running, or walking with their kids, etc, in my neighbourhood as are out now. That said, my suburb is a little remote with only minimal car traffic and only locals walking about, so it is very easy to give people a very wide berth or run/ride in other parts of the area well away from houses etc. As such, for me, my training environment has minimal risk. I'm much more at risk of my wife and son dragging the virus home from their respective work environments. If I was living in a busier area and my training meant I was having to brush past people more closely and frequently I would definitely consider going for the indoor option.

Given the state of play, these restrictions aren't going to be relaxed anytime soon, so people need to adapt their lifestyles to something that is sustainable for the long term. I think having some 'outside time' and getting some exercise, especially for those with already sendentary lifestyles, is vitally important going forward for people's mental and physical health. Provided it is done sensibly and away from others, I think it outweighs the risk of exposure.

Back on topic.... I have a Salomon running vest with 2x500ml soft flasks at the front, 1000ml bladder for the back (if needed), and heaps of pockets for food, etc. There are plenty of good brands/styles around, so just find one that is comfortable and fits you correctly.

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I don't do very long runs atm. but for anything between 1 - 2 hours, the Naked running belt with two bladders works well.  It sits in the right place unlike other belts that I tried that just moved up from my hips to my waist and bounced around.

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I use a spibelt with the two zip pockets for the shorter longer runs. My route has water bubblers so only carrying gels/phone. For the longer runs I have the Salomon 5L vest which has the 2 x 500ml flasks on front and room for a 1.5L bladder in the back plus numerous pockets for gels/phone etc. Like others, the Salomon running vest is great. I find they are a small size though, I have the largest and its a tight fit on me (80kg).

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Since gyms have closed, the presence of the perfumed Lorna Jane types on the trails hasn't  gone unnoticed amongst the female trail runners either. Some comments have been scathing.

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Guest Jim Shortz
6 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

I'm more of a fan of the older style camelbak's rather than the new ones with pockets on front

Bladder on back and gel's in hip pockets

I saying that haven't really used a new style one

I have a newer style Camelbak. 

Only ever took it on runs over 2hrs. And only electrolyte out to 2.5hrs. 

My runs were circa 6:10 pace so.... Easy with no real need for a gel or tailwind 

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59 minutes ago, Jim Shortz said:

I have a newer style Camelbak. 

Only ever took it on runs over 2hrs. And only electrolyte out to 2.5hrs. 

My runs were circa 6:10 pace so.... Easy with no real need for a gel or tailwind 

I tend not to put electrolyte in bladder as it can go mouldy if not carefully cleaned (or frozen). And stored dry

only water or water and salt tab in bladder

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9 hours ago, The Customer said:

That's exactly the one I have, it's great. I tend to use it for runs over 25km.

I also have this for medium runs:

https://www.salomon.com/en-gb/shop-emea/product/pulse-belt.html#color=10390

and these are great for races or training when you want to carry food/phone but no  water (didn't pay 90 bloody quid for them though! Less than half that)

https://www.salomon.com/en-gb/shop-emea/product/exo-motion-twinskin-short.html#color=19210

 

 

 

Edited by FatPom
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Guest Jim Shortz
2 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

I tend not to put electrolyte in bladder as it can go mouldy if not carefully cleaned (or frozen). And stored dry

only water or water and salt tab in bladder

Yeah mine was rinsed post run and chucked in the freezer 

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4 hours ago, FatPom said:

That's exactly the one I have, it's great. I tend to use it for runs over 25km.

 

 

 

Hi FP

Can you please confirm that you still need to buy the 1.5L bladder as a separate item when you purchase the S-Lab hydration vests?

Many many years ago I used to use an around the hips bottle holder on long runs but they move around too much. The S-Lab vests don't move at all and literally feel like a second skin. You hardly know you're wearing it as they so light and comfortable.

cheers

Edited by The Customer
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I run and ride with a product called Wunderfuel from Megabake here in Brisbane. In a 250mL flask, I can carry 450kcal worth of carbohydrate, or the equivalent of 5 gels. Plenty to be out and about for a while.

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Also have the Salomon Running Vest. About 5 years old, but still very similar to the link TC posted. Was initially hesistent to pay that much, but have never regretted the purchase. My wife bought the cheaper Ultimate Direction vest, but has since upgraded to the Salomon.

I rarely use the bladder (which off memory I purchased separately). Instead I just fill the soft flasks with water and take a gel or two if needed.  Don't need to remove the soft flasks to drink, just squeeze it like you were breast feeding yourself.

Cold and wet runs in Winter, I can store gloves and a rain jacket in the vest. It also holds my phone.

As for social isolation, have barely done any exercise in the last 3 weeks (that will probably soon change). And we get all our groceries delivered.

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3 hours ago, The Customer said:

Hi FP

Can you please confirm that you still need to buy the 1.5L bladder as a separate item when you purchase the S-Lab hydration vests?

Many many years ago I used to use an around the hips bottle holder on long runs but they move around too much. The S-Lab vests don't move at all and literally feel like a second skin. You hardly know you're wearing it as they so light and comfortable.

cheers

Hey TC, ho[e you're doing ok up there?

I bought mine a year ago, so assuming it hasn't changed, they don't come with the bladder, just the two torpedo bottles. Not sure about the Advance Skin range, they might include it? But knowing Salomon, whilst the kit is good, they aren't know for chucking a lot of extras in!

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11 minutes ago, The Customer said:

Well a Rolls Royce is a Rolls Royce. When you're the best you don't need to throw in tinted windows for free.

I think the OMM stuff stacks up very well against Salomon, I have quite a few of their items, and I's rather support OMM over Salomon but the main issue with OMM is their woeful lack of stock in regular sizes.

I've tried the UD stuff and didn't like it at all. I thought those bottles with straws would be great but I hated them.  I've always found the Ron Hill stuff really great for the cheap and cheerful basket.

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Long distance running shorts with lots of pockets work well for me – holds bars and gels, as well as a phone, keys and cash/cards. Race Ready is my favorite:

https://www.racereadyusa.com/collections/ld-mens

If I'm running where I know I'll find drinking water at least every hour or so, I use a water bottle belt (Ultimate Directions). Although you have to be careful if you've stuffed the pockets of your shorts – things can slip below the sunscreen line 🙄. If I'm on trails, I have a ultra running vest, also UD.

Screen Shot 2020-04-03 at 07.27.15.png

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On 03/04/2020 at 10:22 AM, gregb said:

Agree. I think the allowed out for exercise should be restricted only to those that can prove they were exercising outdoors regularly prior to COVID.

Cool. I finally have a market for a couple of hundred old race shirts and singlets. 🤑

Edited by Paul Every
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Seriously people, how far are you guys running that you need as much as what your saying.

For a 2 hour run you really need no more the about 250mls of water.

Also know where there are water stops if you can’t carry a 275ml running bottle. No way could I run carrying a belt with bottles hanging off.

 

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1 minute ago, IronmanFoz said:

Seriously people, how far are you guys running that you need as much as what your saying.

For a 2 hour run you really need no more the about 250mls of water.

Also know where there are water stops if you can’t carry a 275ml running bottle. No way could I run carrying a belt with bottles hanging off.

 

It's not about the distance, it's about the time you are out there. Some trails sessions mean you are out there a long time, even if you are moving 'fast'.  On the road, 30km takes me approx, 2.40-2.45, on a trail that can take 5hrs easily if it's steep.

Also, with my vest. I don't train with it loaded because I need it all in that session. I train with it loaded because that's how I will be racing with it.

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2 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

Seriously people, how far are you guys running that you need as much as what your saying.

For a 2 hour run you really need no more the about 250mls of water.

Also know where there are water stops if you can’t carry a 275ml running bottle. No way could I run carrying a belt with bottles hanging off.

 

Depends what part of the World you are in. If I'm in a remote mountain setting, I'm more inclined to stock my Salomon vest with extra food, phone, ID, map, a shell - even on medium length runs. In Scotland sometimes you start a run with gloves and woollen hat but if the sun comes out you want to tuck them away somewhere. In hot climates longest I would go without water is an hour.

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3 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

Seriously people, how far are you guys running that you need as much as what your saying.

For a 2 hour run you really need no more the about 250mls of water.

Also know where there are water stops if you can’t carry a 275ml running bottle. No way could I run carrying a belt with bottles hanging off.

 

 

Mate, with the amount I sweat I need way more than that.  I probably need to do a true sweat test!

As mentioned in the first post, where I am planning to run there are no water stops.

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Guest Jim Shortz
29 minutes ago, The Customer said:

Get the Salomon. You can carry 3 litres in it without even knowing it's on. (make sure you buy the 1.5l bladder as an extra)

Yeah 

Camelbak run vest with 1ltr is great too

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I have Read the feedback....... you all make perfect sense now that you have clarified the type of running and locations. 

Sometimes we all need that little bit of extra info. Happy running.

 

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20 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

Seriously people, how far are you guys running that you need as much as what your saying.

For a 2 hour run you really need no more the about 250mls of water.

Why do you need that? You should be able to do Ironman without drinking.

 

I normally run loops past the car,

or

I run out and back, where I drive out to the start/finish location which is the furtherst point and drop drink/food at roughly 1hr intervals on my drive out.

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On 03/04/2020 at 11:56 AM, nealo said:

Agree with Limited above.

If you have nutrition in a bladder how do you know how much you've consumed? Of course everyone is different and some like to use gels with water so that doesn't matter in that case.

By feeling the weight of it, (not exact admittedly) or if needed, having a look at some point.

It's not that you know how much you drink if you're drinking from a tap periodically either.

While you may have to ration consumption in some circumstances, usually how much you drink is dictated by thirst or temperature, rather than how much you're carrying.

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On 03/04/2020 at 11:29 AM, Limited said:

With the new vest with the soft bottles on the front there is no real stuffing around with lids or putting the bottle back in the holder. Just a slight lift and squeeze of the bottle, no break in stride and no sloshing. With the 2 bottle on the front, 500ml in both one for nutrition and one for plain water. You can also use a bladder if you want as there is a pocket for the bladder

If you fill a bladder correctly and exclude the air, it won't slosh.

Fill, seal, turn upside down, suck the air out through the mouthpiece.*

* Current government regulations prohibit individuals from this practice, except for their own hydration packs and those of immediate family members.

Edited by Paul Every
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No love for a hand-held on this thread? Perfect when you don't need to carry too much and contrary to the name, although it's attached to your hand, you're not actually holding it.

Also on out-and-back routes, consider carrying a bottle part way by whatever means, then stash it to pick up on the way home.

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