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Tubeless Tyre - Ive got a puncture!


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If it has sealant in pump up and spin; this will spray sealant around garage so do outside. 
then put hole at bottom and let sealant do job. 
if you have damaged rim of have a cut in tyre the sealant won’t seal. 

if you have no sealant in tyre then either remove valve core and put some in. Then pump up and spin to seal

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1 hour ago, Surfer said:

Thanks for the info - Ive now pulled a 40mm nail out of my tyre😔 . With a hole like that will sealant work or is it a new tyre?

Only one way to find out.   If you cannot get it to seal then it is a new tyre.  Follow rorydogs advice above.  Will be borderline Id guess.

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1 hour ago, Surfer said:

Thanks for the info - Ive now pulled a 40mm nail out of my tyre😔 .

It was probably a bad idea to put the nail in there in the first place. :D

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Sealant may work. You could try a plug if sealant doesn’t. 
if the tyre is worn then maybe just save hassle and put new one on. 
if going the new route and diy then unfold tyre and put on rim and leave 24hr before trying to pump up. I try and get tyre to clip on and seal before putting sealant in (saves mess if have to take tyre off)  you may need a high volume pump to put tyre on and seal

if buying tyre from lbs get them to put it on

good luck 

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On 31/12/2019 at 6:18 PM, rory-dognz said:

If it has sealant in pump up and spin; this will spray sealant around garage so do outside. 
then put hole at bottom and let sealant do job. 
if you have damaged rim of have a cut in tyre the sealant won’t seal. 

if you have no sealant in tyre then either remove valve core and put some in. Then pump up and spin to seal

I did this & so far the tyre has stayed up. Thanks so much for helping 😊

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On 01/01/2020 at 9:09 PM, Tyno said:

It was probably a bad idea to put the nail in there in the first place. :D

Maybe if he left it in there the air wouldn't have come out?

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On 02/01/2020 at 3:22 AM, rory-dognz said:

Sealant may work. You could try a plug if sealant doesn’t. 
if the tyre is worn then maybe just save hassle and put new one on. 
if going the new route and diy then unfold tyre and put on rim and leave 24hr before trying to pump up. I try and get tyre to clip on and seal before putting sealant in (saves mess if have to take tyre off)  you may need a high volume pump to put tyre on and seal

if buying tyre from lbs get them to put it on

good luck 

Was going to suggest a plug but it's been done. 

You can get niffty ones, ready to use which double as a bar end plug 👍👍

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5 hours ago, Cranky said:

Maybe if SHE left it in there the air wouldn't have come out?

The tyre was dead flat, when I  was looking for the cause I found the nail

BTW Im not a he so I fixed it 😊

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  • 3 weeks later...

Stans claim their sealant will seal up holes up to a quarter of an inch in diameter but in practice the consensus seems to agree on an eighth of an inch. 

So a nail hole should seal. I've heard of people adding sparkles to their sealant mix to help seal bigger holes and faster. I've never felt the need myself. I've been running tubeless for over a decade using Stans and have probably only had something like 3 flats where I needed to use the emergency tube. It's very rare but it's bloody messy when it happens. 

I did have the tyre go down one time because of a nail but after pumping it up again it sealed and stayed up. I think I might have had to rotate the tyre so the hole was at the bottom where pool of sealant would be to get a good seal.

I  did have a couple of issues with some tubeless conversions with the Stans conversion kits for non tubeless rims. The valve on the rim strip would sometimes start to separate from the strip and a hole would form at the base of the valve. The sealant for some reason could never seal the hole. Anyway these rim strip are a thing of the past now and unnecessary with tubeless rims, so forget this paragraph 😁

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Every 3-6 months depending on the weather according to Stans. Diligence would probably gravitate towards 3 months in hotter climates but so far in Sydney I've been getting away with every 6. Signs that you need a top up: the tyre will deflate overnight. So watch the deflation rate. 

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On 26/01/2020 at 10:21 PM, Slowman said:

Every 3-6 months depending on the weather according to Stans. Diligence would probably gravitate towards 3 months in hotter climates but so far in Sydney I've been getting away with every 6. Signs that you need a top up: the tyre will deflate overnight. So watch the deflation rate. 

Thanksyou

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  • 7 months later...

To put air in just same as with tube.

To put sealant in, yes either remove valve core or unseat tire from rim. I do valve core.

Top up sealant using syringe or bottle with thin nose and squeeze in.

I have a small plastic tool that works okay, or use one on my multi tool.

A pair of needle nose pliers works.

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1 hour ago, rory-dognz said:

To put air in just same as with tube.

To put sealant in, yes either remove valve core or unseat tire from rim. I do valve core.

Top up sealant using syringe or bottle with thin nose and squeeze in.

I have a small plastic tool that works okay, or use one on my multi tool.

A pair of needle nose pliers works.

Thanks Rory-dNZ, its really hard to loosen the valve as I do on my roadie to put air in. I have to use pliers. Im putting air in regularly -  Im thinking I need to top up the sealant & get the LBS to make sure the valve isnt dodgy. 

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Yes undoing valve can be difficult. I use pliers frequently. 

I always leave bike after riding so valves can drain!.

If you have no obvious signs of a leak I wouldn't street over topping up sealant. 

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  • 1 month later...

Ok, so I've got a hole in my tubeless road tyre. It's not very big but won't stay sealed.

Do I plug it, or am I wasting my time and it's new tyres time? They aren't dead yet but they are far from new with a year on them.

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Try plugging it, I tried one and didn’t succeed but was a bit of a lame try. Just wanted to go for a ride so took the easy path of putting a tube in.

It is a skill i will need to get right at some stage

When i get motivated (probably after the next puncture in the tube) will try again. 

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16 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

Try plugging it, I tried one and didn’t succeed but was a bit of a lame try. Just wanted to go for a ride so took the easy path of putting a tube in.

It is a skill i will need to get right at some stage

When i get motivated (probably after the next puncture in the tube) will try again. 

I just realised I am in the MTB forum! Anyway, I got it to seal, but I suppose I should spend some money on the emergency plug kits. Does have me second guessing tubeless for the road. Great when it works, but when it fails you are so screwed. The tyres are so tight even sticking a tube in would be a nightmare. Getting it to seal again is also high risk on the side of the road with limited c02...

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59 minutes ago, dazaau said:

I just realised I am in the MTB forum! Anyway, I got it to seal, but I suppose I should spend some money on the emergency plug kits. Does have me second guessing tubeless for the road. Great when it works, but when it fails you are so screwed. The tyres are so tight even sticking a tube in would be a nightmare. Getting it to seal again is also high risk on the side of the road with limited c02...

My comment was based on my road bike. I have run gp5000 or Rubino II successfully tubeless on my Caden rims. They come off fairly easily when required. Technique is to unseat both sides all way around first before using tyre lever.

I also agree that great until fail, but on our roads get less punctures per year so must work. 

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28 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

My comment was based on my road bike. I have run gp5000 or Rubino II successfully tubeless on my Caden rims. They come off fairly easily when required. Technique is to unseat both sides all way around first before using tyre lever.

I also agree that great until fail, but on our roads get less punctures per year so must work. 

I broke levers getting mine on. One was way worse than the other, hopefully next set has a bit more play. My rims weren't designed for tubeless so there is that.

I have had tubeless on my MTB for ages and they never ever had an issue, until they literally had 10c size tears, probably the result of them being so old I think :D 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I remember road testing some Bontrager tubeless rims and tyres, and I also broke levers and blistered thumbs trying to get them on. 

I ended up talking to the rep and he said to stick the tyres in the microwave for a bit to soften the beads. :lol: that's what they were doing. 

I said, that's great but what happens when I flat on the side of the road, do I now need a microwave in my spares kit. 

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On 19/11/2020 at 12:13 PM, roxii said:

I remember road testing some Bontrager tubeless rims and tyres, and I also broke levers and blistered thumbs trying to get them on. 

I ended up talking to the rep and he said to stick the tyres in the microwave for a bit to soften the beads. :lol: that's what they were doing. 

I said, that's great but what happens when I flat on the side of the road, do I now need a microwave in my spares kit. 

Yeah, I'm reevaluating this tubeless thing. Might be better off with tubes with some goop inside them. 

I diy plugged my tyre and it's looking good. Problem is on the side of the road rims lose their seal and then getting them back on is really hard, with c02 a minimum, but often not enough. And then if I want to pop a tube in... It's so hard - i broke a lever and it took me forever just to get them on when I first bought them! 

Maybe I could carry an air-compressor with me 😂

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I stopped to help a cyclist with a flat tyre a few months ago. The wheel was tubeless. The cyclist was trying to get the tyre off so that she could install a tube but was not strong enough to get the tyre off. I tried to get the tyre off but snapped my plastic tyre lever. She had to phone a friend to come and get her.

My road bike has tubeless. I work FIFO and got tired of coming back and finding my tyres flat with a pool of sealant on the floor. Even with one of those air canister pumps I could never get the tyre to seat and seal. I have put tubes in with no more problems. 

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Been a lot written on Slowtwitch about tubeless. Seems they have only just very recently agreed on standards.  So lots of issues with the size of rims and tyre beads.  Hopefully going forward we will start to see less issues.

I'm probably at least 12 months away from upgrading (by then my tri bike will be 10 years old). I want to go tubeless, but only if most of the issues have been resolved.

Main problem I'm hearing at the moment:

- either the tyre is easy is to get on or off (loose fit), but cannot be inflated with a track pump.

- or easily inflated but a bitch to get on or off (tight fit)

The other issue is deflating over time (same as tubulars).  But apparently the new Giant rims have solved this problem

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1 hour ago, Rob said:

Been a lot written on Slowtwitch about tubeless. Seems they have only just very recently agreed on standards.  So lots of issues with the size of rims and tyre beads.  Hopefully going forward we will start to see less issues.

I'm probably at least 12 months away from upgrading (by then my tri bike will be 10 years old). I want to go tubeless, but only if most of the issues have been resolved.

Main problem I'm hearing at the moment:

- either the tyre is easy is to get on or off (loose fit), but cannot be inflated with a track pump.

- or easily inflated but a bitch to get on or off (tight fit)

The other issue is deflating over time (same as tubulars).  But apparently the new Giant rims have solved this problem

Sounds like I just need new wheels :) But that's an expensive solution to tubes :D 

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