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I have read the odd article that says running after a knee or hip replacement is fine to do.  But Kieran, yours is the first time I've actually heard of a doctor saying it's ok to run!  Generally it's considered about everything is fine to do except running, ever!  I was told to stop running completely to stave off a knee replacement, and that after it there will be no running at all.  

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1 hour ago, goughy said:

I have read the odd article that says running after a knee or hip replacement is fine to do.  But Kieran, yours is the first time I've actually heard of a doctor saying it's ok to run!  Generally it's considered about everything is fine to do except running, ever!  I was told to stop running completely to stave off a knee replacement, and that after it there will be no running at all.  

Yep the surgeon had no qualms about it, not that my dad would ever run, but the surgeon was adament this knee would be better than the original and would happily see a patient return to running if that’s what they did prior to the replacement.  

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9 hours ago, oldave said:

Bit of an update; about 4 months out from the op and other than the scar I wouldn't know i had a hip replacement, full mobility ( haven't tried running and not about to) . I've been gradually reducing the Targin over the past few months and about to drop off completely. A few aches and pains with that, I can understand why heroin addicts find it so hard to quit. Bowels are better for it as well. 

That’s great mate. Hopefully I have similar results.

my pain meds only go for a few more days, not sure what is after that but I’ll be trying to get off them as quick as possible. 
again last night sleeping is an absolute nightmare. 
I said to the Mrs it’s like waking up in the middle of the night with a cramp (we’ve all been there) but then having to try and go back to sleep in the same position while you still have the cramp. 

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I don't want to give bad advice on something that I know nothing about but then again, it's never stopped me before....

There is has been a lot of talk about running post hip operation as a complete No- No. But there is a bloke at our tri club that seems to cope with it quite well so I reached out for him and his opinion on the subject - and I quote:

Hi XXX - there is some talk among us older folk about hip replacement and running on artificial hips - It is supposed to be a real no-no but I know you do it.  How is it working out? Would you recommend it?"

Hi Pete, with the correct rehab, there is no problem. I have had both mine done . The first is about 16 years old the other is about 7 years old. I took out the Trail Series this year and am training for New Zealand in March. I helped a lady here, after her hip replacement 12 months ago, and she just did the 10k on the weekend. If you need advice on how to rehab, let me know.

So it looks like that for some people at least, bionic hips don't hold you back!  Happy to connect you to XXX if you would like some advice - he is a great bloke and loves to help people.

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From what I've read, running after knee and hip replacements can be much more pain free than what the person experienced before, maybe feeling normal for the first time for some.  But it's the belief that you wear them out faster, hence needing another, or several more replacements, later on.  Clearly roxii was at a point that it had to be done.  My knee, the surgeon wants to hold it is as long as I can, hence I've had to stop running now (and he said I couldn't run of we did it now anyway, so no difference).  He also knew a knee replacement would seriously affect my work for a period and I can't afford to be off work.

The not holding them back may be a choice they were willing to make.  They may also be willing to get another, then another, or can afford to do so.

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2 hours ago, roxii said:

Again last night sleeping is an absolute nightmare...

Maybe don't stress about getting a 'long' sleep overnight until you recover a bit.  I'd imagine if you can get a couple of decent 'naps' during the day as well then you should still be getting enough rest.

Following my recent surgery I found that sleeping on the recliner chair right back with one of those aeroplane 'neck pillows' worked great...  and I'm usually a very poor sleeper  :sleeping:.

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32 minutes ago, Go Easy said:

Maybe don't stress about getting a 'long' sleep overnight until you recover a bit.  I'd imagine if you can get a couple of decent 'naps' during the day as well then you should still be getting enough rest.

Following my recent surgery I found that sleeping on the recliner chair right back with one of those aeroplane 'neck pillows' worked great...  and I'm usually a very poor sleeper  :sleeping:.

I've found, it's not only the pain but the feeling of being 'trapped' that does your head in at night.  Watching mindless tv helped, then I'd just doze off.

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Its a challenge all this talk of running on a joint replacement. When I was a young Physio 28 years ago you had a hip replacement at age 70+ to let you walk into Bingo, not mid 40's to resume triathlon.

In that time, the joints are better and supposedly last longer. Back in the day it was 5-10 years and they hated putting one in early as they are a bastard to get out. Now they last 20 years apparently so they are wacking them into younger and younger people all the time. Joint replacement is incredibly effective pain relief for 75%. The other 25% get no relief or get worse.

Conventional wisdom (backed by a paper surveying all knee and hip surgeons in the USA) is that more impact = early component wear and the consensus from the surgeons was doubles social tennis, golf and dancing were as heavy as you should go. Running is generally discouraged for the reason it can wear the components down earlier. The component manufacturers probably build in some redundancy., I'm not a rep so don;t know the exact engineering or materials testing of them, but another issue is problems at the implant/human interface like stress fractures and component loosening. Anecdotally, I am seeing a bloke at the moment who tore the patellar component off his knee replacement going back to bootcamp too early.

If it was me with a new joint I'd find a non-impact way to get my endorphin hit.

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A close friend of mine had a hip replacement 2 or 3 years ago. He was extremely conscientious with his rehab.

He's back and running, though certainly not doing anything like the mileage he once did. Earlier this year he ran and won the Christmas Island Marathon in his first race since returning to running. Yes, it was a small field, a slow course and a relatively slow time.

Putting aside the merits of his approach, there's definitely opportunities for an active life after the op.

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So about 9 days post op and home for a week. 
heading in tomorrow for wound check and will hopefully get told how soon I can get in the water.

a few things so far. In the early days, day one and two post op, I think I assumed the level of pain correctly, I think I just forgot how much being in that pain level takes out of you. Whilst the pain was a constant 4-5 the three to four times per hour the pain was at 9-10 even if only momentarily really takes its toll both mentally and physically. 

while the hospital and nurses could not have been better it’s great to get home. 

the biggest issue I’m having still is that in order to rest and recover I need to try and find a comfortable position to sit or lie down and this is almost impossible due to the position of the wound, the swelling around the area and the restrictions given on various postures. I actually on a few occasions have just stood in the lounge room on my crutches as I could not get comfortable in any position. 
a few people have suggested sleeping tablets but given that there are certain positions they don’t want you sleeping in till further healing has taken place im not sure I want to be zonked our and risk putting the joint in a compromised position.
The pain killers (Targin) also has as its side effects sleeping issues, rashes, hit and cold flushes and I seem to “crash” about 2pm most afternoons. So I’m going to speak to the hospital tomorrow about how soon I can wean off them.

its amazing how when the simple things in life like a good sleep, sitting comfortably and even having a relaxing “no.2” are made difficult how the base stress levels rise making everything else that little more uncomfortable and annoying. 
Anyway at 10 days in I think I’m in better shape than I would have assumed, but as you would expect each little gain begets greater expectation which needs to be tempered somewhat. 
I also spoke to the wife about the feeling that I should be getting back to work “as soon as I can” where she is trying to convince me not to race back to work but to get myself to a place where 8 hours a day at a desk plus 2 hours commute in a car  are not going to cause me to regress. I’ve got 9 months sickies up my sleeve so obviously I’m not a serial sickie taker.

 

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Thats what I'm not looking forward to when I eventually get my knee done, particularly with my job.  Time off isn't really in my vocabulary.

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1 hour ago, roxii said:

So about 9 days post op and home for a week. 
heading in tomorrow for wound check and will hopefully get told how soon I can get in the water.

a few things so far. In the early days, day one and two post op, I think I assumed the level of pain correctly, I think I just forgot how much being in that pain level takes out of you. Whilst the pain was a constant 4-5 the three to four times per hour the pain was at 9-10 even if only momentarily really takes its toll both mentally and physically. 

while the hospital and nurses could not have been better it’s great to get home. 

the biggest issue I’m having still is that in order to rest and recover I need to try and find a comfortable position to sit or lie down and this is almost impossible due to the position of the wound, the swelling around the area and the restrictions given on various postures. I actually on a few occasions have just stood in the lounge room on my crutches as I could not get comfortable in any position. 

 

Mate, I have a 'little' experience of this. There is a fine line between having minimal pain killers, so that you are aware mentally with what's going on and needing some help with getting in the right position without being in agony. Sometimes you need a little help.

I find the hardest bit is trying to change positions without stressing out. It's like you can be ok lying down or standing up but the most painful/stressful bit is that transition in-between the two. Very often I've been 'frozen' at that point, absolutely petrified to go any further as you know how painful it will be.  I wish I had an easy answer.  The only thing I found helped was tying things around the house that helped me get up and get down, that way your body is not taking the whole strain and it helps calm down the shaking.

On the mental side of things, I've found it very useful to keep track of progress i.e.:  Yesterday I could get x far own my own, today is a few meters further,,that kind of thing.  I also found things like small step ups and counting them, really good.  I remember the first I could take myself to the bathroom in 3mths, it was like I'd won the Olympics.

Take the small daily victories where you can get mate and build on that.  It really helps with the mental side IME.

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2 hours ago, roxii said:

So about 9 days post op and home for a week. 
heading in tomorrow for wound check and will hopefully get told how soon I can get in the water.

a few things so far. In the early days, day one and two post op, I think I assumed the level of pain correctly, I think I just forgot how much being in that pain level takes out of you. Whilst the pain was a constant 4-5 the three to four times per hour the pain was at 9-10 even if only momentarily really takes its toll both mentally and physically. 

while the hospital and nurses could not have been better it’s great to get home. 

the biggest issue I’m having still is that in order to rest and recover I need to try and find a comfortable position to sit or lie down and this is almost impossible due to the position of the wound, the swelling around the area and the restrictions given on various postures. I actually on a few occasions have just stood in the lounge room on my crutches as I could not get comfortable in any position. 
a few people have suggested sleeping tablets but given that there are certain positions they don’t want you sleeping in till further healing has taken place im not sure I want to be zonked our and risk putting the joint in a compromised position.
The pain killers (Targin) also has as its side effects sleeping issues, rashes, hit and cold flushes and I seem to “crash” about 2pm most afternoons. So I’m going to speak to the hospital tomorrow about how soon I can wean off them.

its amazing how when the simple things in life like a good sleep, sitting comfortably and even having a relaxing “no.2” are made difficult how the base stress levels rise making everything else that little more uncomfortable and annoying. 
Anyway at 10 days in I think I’m in better shape than I would have assumed, but as you would expect each little gain begets greater expectation which needs to be tempered somewhat. 
I also spoke to the wife about the feeling that I should be getting back to work “as soon as I can” where she is trying to convince me not to race back to work but to get myself to a place where 8 hours a day at a desk plus 2 hours commute in a car  are not going to cause me to regress. I’ve got 9 months sickies up my sleeve so obviously I’m not a serial sickie taker.

 

You're rushing it and trying to be a hero. I was on 40mg Targin initially because I needed it for the pain but have gradually reduced (under the doc) to 10s; seeing my doc tomorrow to reduce to 5s and then off altogether. So what if you crash in the arvo, it won't kill you. I never had any side effects until I started to reduce with aches and pains but nothing two panadol didn't remedy. I had poor mobility initially; crutches, poor sleeping and sitting positions but improved over time. Bowels are great now.

Being a great triathlete is knowing when to rest when fatigued or injured, this is no different. Stop being a workaholic and pushing what can't be pushed. Take your meds as prescribed, listen to your wife and medical professionals and do when and what's expected of you. 

You have a really poor attitude to treatment and recovery, I wouldn't want to be in any team with you.

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9 hours ago, FatPom said:

 

I find the hardest bit is trying to change positions without stressing out. It's like you can be ok lying down or standing up but the most painful/stressful bit is that transition in-between the two. Very often I've been 'frozen' at that point, absolutely petrified to go any further as you know how painful it will be.  I wish I had an easy answer.  The only thing I found helped was tying things around the house that helped me get up and get down, that way your body is not taking the whole strain and it helps calm down the shaking.

Yeah I know mate, I get stuck occasionally trying to get in or out of bed or on or off the couch where the left leg just gets stuck in limbo where I can’t lift it but it hasn’t made it to its destination and a few times I’ve just sort of dropped my head in desperation. I’m getting there though. 
As I say I’m actually surprised how well I am compared to what I would have imagined at this stage of my recovery so I’m just reminding myself to progress with caution. 

8 hours ago, oldave said:

You have a really poor attitude to treatment and recovery, I wouldn't want to be in any team with you.

:huh: thanks for the support mate. Thankfully I’m happy with my team and they are happy with me. 
I have never once done anything contrary to Dr or nurses orders and am currently taking the medicine I have been prescribed. (Targin 20/10 twice a day.)  I said I don’t like what it does to me  and I’d like to be off it, but if  my team say no, then so be it, I’ll stick with the course. 

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9 hours ago, oldave said:

Being a great triathlete is knowing when to rest when fatigued or injured, this is no different. Stop being a workaholic and pushing what can't be pushed. Take your meds as prescribed, listen to your wife and medical professionals and do when and what's expected of you. 

You have a really poor attitude to treatment and recovery, I wouldn't want to be in any team with you.

Pull your head in. Nothing Roxii has said would indicate he's doing anything other than what he needs to do and has been told to do. 

Some people are more dedicated to their own recoveries than others. Some people need less pain meds. Some people like to be pro-active whilst still following instructions to the letter. If I was a medical professional this is exactly the sort of person I'd want to be treating.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So 4 weeks in and all is going pretty well.

After dropping the crutches I was walking like I had a wooden leg, so I swallowed some pride and also some tablets. 2 x Panadol and a Voltaren morning and night and it made a huge difference. 
Able to walk much better albeit with some concentration to keep it looking “natural”. 
It’s amazing how much it takes out of you having to concentrate on waking, makes a half hour walk exhausting. 
Still not allowed to try and close my hip angle beyond 90 degrees till I get the ok from the surgeon Monday week , even though I feel like I could if I had to,  apparently the hip is still prone to dislocation up until all the muscles have had time to strengthen around the joint. 
Anyway at 4 weeks I’m probably doing a bit better than I thought I would at this stage, 

knocking out my 10000 steps a day and started back with some easy swimming this week. 

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Week 5 update:

So stupidly I started feeling good and the “athlete” in me kicked in. 
I began treating rehab like a training session, bad mistake. 
My hip flexors on the affected leg have been pretty much inactive for the last 2 years due to the restriction in my hip, so once able I got really stuck in to stretching and exercising that muscle.

After Monday’s session I was pretty sore and the next day was pretty stiff (typical DOMS symptoms) but after Wednesday’s rehab where I obviously went too hard I was in immense pain and Thursday (my birthday) was spent almost unable to walk or even get out of a chair without the pain being in the 8-9 category.

It was that bad the Mrs took some convincing not to take me back to hospital. 
 

At Friday’s rehab I informed them I was going to be taking it easy and just pegged myself against the 70-80 year olds :lol: and unsurprisingly I’m feeling much better today. 
 

I see the surgeon on Monday and hope to get the all clear to lift restrictions (still not allowed to bend hip beyond 90 degrees) and then SLOWLY start to try and regain movement I haven’t had for two or so years. 
 

Just gotta remind myself this isn’t a  sprint. 
 

Not looking forward to going back to work though :lol: 

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2 hours ago, roxii said:

Week 5 update:

 I see the surgeon on Monday and hope to get the all clear to lift restrictions (still not allowed to bend hip beyond 90 degrees) and then SLOWLY start to try and regain movement I haven’t had for two or so years. 

Not looking forward to going back to work though :lol: 

The good news is you have about 33 weeks til the ski season starts and even then, another 4 before there is some decent snow on the group. Take the time to recover. 

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Week 6 update:

So I got some bad news this week.... I’m ok to return to work :lol: 

Got some post op xrays and saw the surgeon on Monday.

He is happy with the progress, bone is starting to grow around the prosthetic (no cement used in mine). Still have to be cautious with rotating the hip internally and avoid too much high impact stuff while the bone regrows.

Told him I still had a bit of pain in the hip flexor area, he put the xrays up on the screen and said “look at all the work we did in there! I’d be surprised if you were pain free after only 6 weeks.” 
984711B0-A7AA-41A7-AB54-F9586C9C81E0.jpeg
 

so walking and swimming are all I’m up for in the next few weeks. Can get on the trainer now but not on the road till the new year. He doesn’t want me crashing and ruining his handiwork.

Hardest part about resuming normal activities (work etc)  is finding a way to get a shoe and sock on my left foot. Try getting down to your foot when you can’t close your hip beyond 90 degrees!! 
 

My boss said to just come and go as I please for the first few weeks, as I’m not sure how 8 hours in an office chair will go for both my comfort and recovery. 

At least I get a few days of watching the cricket before I go back to work. 

 

 

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Jeeze you're not making me look forward to when my knee has to be done!  Can't imagine taking that sort of time off work!

There's a guy at my old golf forum that says he's getting a total hip replacement in a week or so.  Was told he'll be able to start chipping in a couple of weeks, 3/4 swings in 5 weeks and playing in a cart by about 6 weeks!  

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Hey mate. I suppose it varies by individual. If I HAD to I probably could have gone back to work part time or worked from home for a few hours a day, however  I don’t believe it would have been beneficial to my recovery, short term or long term.

seeing a few folks in rehab with knees done, some with both done at once, they seemed to do ok IF they were in good shape prior to surgery (bear in mind im talking 65+ year olds) 

the biggest  issue they seem to have is getting better range of motion back, so depending on how mobile you need to be at work or if there is any kneeling etc that needs to be done you might want to modify your workplace beforehand to allow you to access pieces from the standing position so you can get back to work earlier. 
 

As for your mate with his hip, a lot depends on the surgeon and what surgery he does, if he is doing anterior then that would seem about right. With posterior, like I got, they cut a lot of the stabilising muscles so rotation especially inward can pose problems. So I could probably play golf if it was my right hip I got done (I’m a right hander) but because it’s my left hip and if I drive and push through that hip I’m possibly putting that hip at risk. I could walk the course now though. 
I don’t like golf that much to risk it. :lol: 

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  • 1 month later...

Hey mate. 
Yeah going ok, about 11 weeks in now. 
Apart from a slight bit of discomfort after sleeping on that side all night, or spending extended periods in one position and getting a bit of stiffness it’s not too bad. 
Swimming is fine, occasionally get a bit of an odd feeling (not a pain as such) when I try and kick from the hip. 
Still need to work on flexibility a bit but haven’t been pushing it too hard  as it’s slowly coming along naturally. 
Hope to swing the leg over the bike in a few weeks and see how that goes, hopefully that will give me a few more opportunities to lose a few kgs as well (if any of my Lycra fits :lol: ) 

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  • 4 weeks later...

How's it going Roxii and oldave? Nice living pain free again?

I actually had a BHR IN 2011 same as TUvn.n and did Busso in 2004. I lost the urge to train for hours and had a young family again and with increasing career pressures never ventured near IM again. Not that I didn't want to I only just sold my tri bike a couple of months ago... and bought another surboard😃

I did run in the Sydney half marathon in 2017 and the hip was fine. The muscles were another story. However that kind of running is not recommended for a THR. Because of the stem inserted into the femur I believe too much pounding can loosen it. In any case the orthopod should have discussed all this with you.

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  • 4 weeks later...

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