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Mtn bike set up v road


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I googled the shiz out of this and cane back with same set up or maybe a tad lower. I am 1 cm lower and find I lift the front on step stuff fairly easily but that is probably technique based as well.

Yep

You should be lower and further back

 

Try and get lower at the front and lean way forward to stop front end raising

Cheers

Ivp

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Same saddle height as road and just learn how to move around/get behind your saddle. OR get a dropper. If learning something really difficult like Hammerhead (near vertical 1-2m step down) in Canberra you might drop the saddle while you learn it so it does not hit you in the chest or get caught behind it. Think, trying to touch your rear tyre with your arse.

 

Like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16471809645/in/set-72157650292767408

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16445106206/in/set-72157650284145749

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16285537209/in/set-72157650292767408

Dropping the bars as much as possible will help with climbing and help with front end grip. BUT on steep down stuff you may need to lean back more (keeping weight central over BB) to keep from going over the bars.

 

Agree lifting the front when you don't want is more technique than the bike. After a few hundred hours it will happen less.

 

When climbing really steep stuff you can.

 

A. Do it in the saddle leaning right forward or

 

B. Do it out of the saddle in a heavier gear than normal and power up it. You just need to avoid doing the roadie thing and leaning too far forward out of the saddle unweighting the rear. Keep some weight over the rear wheel. The bigger gear will help avoid wheel spin and for steep obstacles like big rock step ups you go farther with each pedal stroke limiting pedal strike.

 

On a side note, different to road riding in mountain biking you should "section" stuff over and over again for a couple of hours. I often spend 2 hours straight on 100m of track. But once you learn that it follows you everywhere. You will be amazed what you learn by doing this. Improvements will be out of sight.

Edited by thekeeper
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Not an issue with me buuuuut with the saddle that much lower you will be slower everywhere or having to spend more time out of the saddle to get the power down. This is apart from the few obstacles where you need to get behind the saddle to avoid going over the bars.

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Same saddle height as road and just learn how to move around/get behind your saddle. OR get a dropper. If learning something really difficult like Hammerhead (near vertical 1-2m step down) in Canberra you might drop the saddle while you learn it so it does not hit you in the chest or get caught behind it. Think, trying to touch your rear tyre with your arse.

 

Like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16471809645/in/set-72157650292767408

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16445106206/in/set-72157650284145749

https://www.flickr.com/photos/45916358@N05/16285537209/in/set-72157650292767408

 

Dropping the bars as much as possible will help with climbing and help with front end grip. BUT on steep down stuff you may need to lean back more (keeping weight central over BB) to keep from going over the bars.

 

Agree lifting the front when you don't want is more technique than the bike. After a few hundred hours it will happen less.

 

When climbing really steep stuff you can.

 

A. Do it in the saddle leaning right forward or

 

B. Do it out of the saddle in a heavier gear than normal and power up it. You just need to avoid doing the roadie thing and leaning too far forward out of the saddle unweighting the rear. Keep some weight over the rear wheel. The bigger gear will help avoid wheel spin and for steep obstacles like big rock step ups you go farther with each pedal stroke limiting pedal strike.

 

On a side note, different to road riding in mountain biking you should "section" stuff over and over again for a couple of hours. I often spend 2 hours straight on 100m of track. But once you learn that it follows you everywhere. You will be amazed what you learn by doing this. Improvements will be out of sight.

I dropped mine a little and agree it makes a difference putting the power down but was just didn't feel "right" on downhills. Getting in the way a bit. Dropper too heavy / expensive (especially with annoying 27.2 post) but will up the seat for races

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There's always a range with seat height - it's not an exact science. From reading other forums having a slightly lower seat height than that of their road bike is pretty common. Personally I am around the same but I never ran seat heights at the top of my range as I hate pedalling with toes pointed down. One reason to consider running slightly lower is to reduce the incidence of your knee locking out over bumps when you are on the rivet! Experiment and find what works best for you.

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On a side note, different to road riding in mountain biking you should "section" stuff over and over again for a couple of hours. I often spend 2 hours straight on 100m of track. But once you learn that it follows you everywhere. You will be amazed what you learn by doing this. Improvements will be out of sight.

Agree, repetition is king so long as you are not reinforcing bad habits. Cornering and climbing are polar opposite to road riding. Plenty of riders try to corner with similar technique to what they'd use on the road. #1 mistake: leaning your body into a flat or off camber corner.
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If your knees are locked out descending because the seat is too high...THE SEAT IS TOO HIGH :)

 

Repetition is good regardless, because after while you get enough feel to what is going on. Get comfy with drift and ultimately your style changes.

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Agree, repetition is king so long as you are not reinforcing bad habits. Cornering and climbing are polar opposite to road riding. Plenty of riders try to corner with similar technique to what they'd use on the road. #1 mistake: leaning your body into a flat or off camber corner.

 

Break that down. Going into a corner, i would naturally lean my body, of course each corner is different.

 

Let's say off a descent and going into a turn at speed,and assuming you have course knowledge as a guide.

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If your knees are locked out descending because the seat is too high...THE SEAT IS TOO HIGH :)

 

Repetition is good regardless, because after while you get enough feel to what is going on. Get comfy with drift and ultimately your style changes.

 

Got a 3-4 k segment. Big up and big down on a bad section of trail. So I guess I would ride that back and forth over 2 hours. 30 mins each way to get there. 3 hrs all up.

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Break that down. Going into a corner, i would naturally lean my body, of course each corner is different.

 

Let's say off a descent and going into a turn at speed,and assuming you have course knowledge as a guide.

As you said, every corner is different but if you take a corner as per your example with loose over hard, be it gravel, leaves, dirt (there's always something) and you lean your body with your bike into the corner, you aren't getting maximum downforce through your tyres and as your centre of gravity is not over the bike, a slip of the front wheel will likely land you on your arse. To get max downforce, drop your outside pedal as you approach, keep your body upright and lean the bike into the turn, so if the turn is to the left, your right pedal is down, heels dropped to lower your centre of gravity, straighten your left arm which will lean your bike whilst bringing your right elbow up. Twisting your upper body into the turn (think of a corkscrew) and looking ahead through the turn also helps a lot. How much you lean depends on the speed and radius of the turn. I find that by having my weight over the bike I can handle the drifts better and tend to have less "oh f#ck" moments. Edited by Hotdiggitydog
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Brilliant. The guy ahead of me in my race was doing the opposite. And although I thought it was wrong, I tended to follow his moves.

 

He had left pedal up going into a RH turn.

 

Tranferring this one to my Filipino bike forum.

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Brilliant. The guy ahead of me in my race was doing the opposite. And although I thought it was wrong, I tended to follow his moves.

 

He had left pedal up going into a RH turn.

 

Tranferring this one to my Filipino bike forum.

That will likely end badly!

 

There is a lot to think about but it eventually becomes automatic. It helps to find a fairly straight forward corner and practice it over and over. Another good place to practice is on a short stretch of road with a culdesac.

Edited by Hotdiggitydog
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I run my MTB seat slightly lower than my road bike for most of my XC riding, between approx. 1cm and 2cm lower. This is a comfort thing as much as anything, it also allows me to get of the back of the seat easier; for technical steep downhills. The other reason is I wear baggy shorts on the MTB and need to be able to move of the seat easier.

 

If a technical trail I may lower the seat another 1-2 cm, but certainly pay the price in terms of power/comfort v less likely to crash. If I was riding more tech trails I would go for a dropper seat post as this solve the problem

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As you said, every corner is different but if you take a corner as per your example with loose over hard, be it gravel, leaves, dirt (there's always something) and you lean your body with your bike into the corner, you aren't getting maximum downforce through your tyres and as your centre of gravity is not over the bike, a slip of the front wheel will likely land you on your arse. To get max downforce, drop your outside pedal as you approach, keep your body upright and lean the bike into the turn, so if the turn is to the left, your right pedal is down, heels dropped to lower your centre of gravity, straighten your left arm which will lean your bike whilst bringing your right elbow up. Twisting your upper body into the turn (think of a corkscrew) and looking ahead through the turn also helps a lot. How much you lean depends on the speed and radius of the turn. I find that by having my weight over the bike I can handle the drifts better and tend to have less "oh f#ck" moments.

 

Nice tip on straightening the left arm into a LH turn. If your technique is good, as I hope mine is improving. The left arm will tend to straighten and the right elbow will go up naturally.

 

Good to work on and have everything happen at the same time, but worth the effort.

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Nice tip on straightening the left arm into a LH turn. If your technique is good, as I hope mine is improving. The left arm will tend to straighten and the right elbow will go up naturally.

 

Good to work on and have everything happen at the same time, but worth the effort.

the outside elbow will bend if you keep your body upright and lean the bike by straightening the inside arm; however I find it helps to bring your elbow up and in line with the bars. Often the tendency is to bend the elbow but have it tucked into the ribcage. Visualise your whole body driving the bike through the turn: Eyes looking through the turn, trunk and elbow twisting slightly into the turn. It's just time and practice.

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the outside elbow will bend if you keep your body upright and lean the bike by straightening the inside arm; however I find it helps to bring your elbow up and in line with the bars. Often the tendency is to bend the elbow but have it tucked into the ribcage. Visualise your whole body driving the bike through the turn: Eyes looking through the turn, trunk and elbow twisting slightly into the turn. It's just time and practice.

 

Still looking for some good sharp corners to practice on..I have some but can pedal through them, so the above doesn't apply. Practiced the technique today, corner not so sharp, but felt the technique coming together, not yet automatic.

 

We go long on the weekend. Saturday 7th we will do 100 km plus my commute...115 approx. We wanted endurance work because our next event is 52 km....21st March. The long ride is mostly on highway, there's a few broken bits and a little off road.

 

That leaves midweek to work on skills. I will ride 3hrs off road Thursday, repeating a 10 k loop or segment. Working on skills and technique. That leaves 2 more rides in a week...one where I do intervals, like practicing fast starts as mentioned on the other thread. The other ride is off road, but a different course, nearer home, just time in the saddle.

 

Tomorrow I ride the road bike doing work on the tri bars...there's a triathlon 28th..one week after the MTB race. For now the MTB event is my A race, short term

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