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I read all these posts about guys that have trained and raced for years to reach the 'holy grail' but surely at some point they must realize it ain't goin to happen.

 

For me personally I've come from a junior sprint background then walked away from the sport for 15yrs, I've now been back for 2yrs and progressed through olys to now doing my third HIM this year at port. I guess it's always been in the back of my mind to one day race IM's and try and qualify which I plan to start in 2016(young fam ATM).

 

it's got me thinking though, if ones aspiration to do an IM was to qualify for kona surely the decision is already made for you. From what I've seen and I'm def no expert, you could train the house down but unless you posses a lot of natural talent the chances of qualifying are slim. I'm yet to really commit to training because of my current lifestyle but I put in around 10-11hrs a week of unstructured work and I walk away with ok results.

 

So here's the question, how much time would you allocate to make a decision on whether you will make it?

OR

would you be happy for someone to tell you it ain't going to happen?

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I'm one of the lucky ones. I'm not even close to qualifying so the carrot isn't there for me.

 

I started this sport when I was 39. I'm now 46. I'm heavily involved in the sport as president of our club and my wife and I both race as much as we can. We do the sport for enjoyment and a certain sense of fulfillment. We'll keep doing it until the enjoyment stops.

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I think most people already know the answer to the question of whether they are going to make it. Either they're like Downsey & have accepted that they won't, or like you and it's just a matter of time.

 

It's the smaller % in the middle that are close,but maybe just out (though they could cherrypick races) that need to think about this. I suppose there are also the ones who everybody else knows will never make it, but keep kidding themselves that it's just another 2 seasons away. They probably need to be slapped around by a close friend and given a reality check very early in the piece.

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I'm a very big believer that natural talent is only a tiny piece of the puzzle in this sport. I honestly believe anyone can qualify for Kona as an age grouper if they are willing to put in the work. What you have to realise though is that amount of work will vary vastly from person to person. It all comes down to priorities. I've seen many people, even through my short stint in this sport, do the work required for them to qualify but at the same time lose valuable time with their children, give their career a back seat, and in worse case scenarios, have failed relationships with their husband/wife. So I suppose I'm saying that natural talent might mean you can get away with less overall volume, but to say natural talent is the reason you can't get to Kona (as either an age grouper or pro IMO) is a bit of a cop out. It may just take a hell of a lot more work, and I can absolutely see why people wouldn't be willing to put that ahead of things which in the scheme of things are much more important (I.e. Children etc.)

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Interesting question.

 

I know a lady who was slagged off by 99% of the people she came across because of her goal of Kona. 7 yrs later they were red faced.

 

Me, I am a dreamer, I wanted/dreamed of racing in Kona. But after 5 HIM's with the last in Busso being ANOTHER 7+hr finish, I was shattered. I then (finally screams my wife) knew I was very much BOP and staying there. I didn't do anything tri related for 3-4 yrs(using the birth of my daughter as an excuse) and moped about. But recently, a "change of circumstances" has me more up best and back training. Surprisingly my Wife is saying "finally" again, but this time, about me back immersed in Triathlon stuff.

 

So it took 7yrs for one lady, and she's still hungry. It took 4 7hr finishes and one 6:59:32 for me to realise. And yes, I can be slow to catch on to stuff, not all stuff, just the BLEEDING OBVIOUS!! LOL

 

 

"....you're going to get better through training, not by being on the computer"

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Great question...For me it took 7 x IM's and chronic running injuries and a surgeon to suggest that he'll remove the nerves from my feet so I could actually run, but I would have no feeling in my toes for the rest of my life.......When I thought that might be a good option, I decided to walk away from the sport.

 

No regrets

 

fluro

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Most try for 3 years from what I've seen.

 

Or they stay for ages.

 

Plaz - 3 yr I think

Yoyo- about the same. Now walked away.

 

Both done 9.xx low. Not good enough.

 

Then someone like mr flower. Fast. Didn't qualify but keeps slogging.

 

But exceptions like Smitty. 2001 did 13+

Qualified in 2009 2010.

 

I think a lot of people that quit pick the wrong races.

 

Like small guys that pick flat bike courses.

 

Good swimmers picking wetsuit races.

 

Big guys picking hilly courses or hot courses.

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It's taken me 20 years and I still don't really know if I'm good enough.

 

Apart from ability and circumstances, qualifying for Kona also takes luck.

(Luck is just a matter of good preparation meeting opportunity).

Cool. Very cool to read this.

Thanks

 

 

"....you're going to get better through training, not by being on the computer"

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I had a 5 yr goal from when I started. I just thought that's how long it would take to be good enough. I was bang on the money. I also agree you need to be lucky and you also need to not be afraid of failing. I was 100% happy with my qualifying race and whether I qualified or not I told my GF (now wife) immediately after crossing the line... whatever happens tomorrow ( at roll down) remind me that I was happy with my race and had nothing left. If it doesn't happen I got beaten by better guys and they deserve to go. Bring on watching this year. :-)

 

LB.

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I read all these posts about guys that have trained and raced for years to reach the 'holy grail' but surely at some point they must realize it ain't goin to happen.

 

For me personally I've come from a junior sprint background then walked away from the sport for 15yrs, I've now been back for 2yrs and progressed through olys to now doing my third HIM this year at port. I guess it's always been in the back of my mind to one day race IM's and try and qualify which I plan to start in 2016(young fam ATM).

 

it's got me thinking though, if ones aspiration to do an IM was to qualify for kona surely the decision is already made for you. From what I've seen and I'm def no expert, you could train the house down but unless you posses a lot of natural talent the chances of qualifying are slim. I'm yet to really commit to training because of my current lifestyle but I put in around 10-11hrs a week of unstructured work and I walk away with ok results.

 

So here's the question, how much time would you allocate to make a decision on whether you will make it?

OR

would you be happy for someone to tell you it ain't going to happen?

I took up training and competing in triathlon with the sole purpose of going to Kona in my 40s. I spoke to a few coaches right at the start and was told at least 5 years. I though **** that I'll do it in 2. A bit over 3 years later I qualified and here I am in Kona. I'd have walked away in 5 if I didn't - though that was never really an option as the question was always when not if - and probably still will exit after 5.

 

I train with no big plan (just more when things get close then less when there really close) or any real structure - most my session I decide on when the alarm goes off.

 

Apparently I have natural talent and my friends who've been broken by IM don't. However when you look at my training diary and theirs, theres a big ****in difference.

 

Shame about the lance reference and there are a lot better articles out there:

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2010/01/the-myth-of-natural-ability-in-elite-sport/

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But he couldn't qualify regardless. Why? Too big. The event requires someone who can run a fast (relatively) mara at the end of two pretty gruelling legs and statistics seem to support that the 95kg plus athletes cannot do that.

 

So if you're a tall, big boned, heavy (not necessarily fat) IM wanna be, you can look at the stats and see that regardless of talent, training, lack of injuries etc, kona will only come via legacy or lottery in all likelihood

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Apparently I have natural talent and my friends who've been broken by IM don't. However when you look at my training diary and theirs, theres a big ****in difference.

 

 

This.

 

I took up tri's in my early 30's - couldn't even swim at that point, never really ridden a bike and had done a bit of running as a kid. Trained casually for a few years and raced short stuff but still got nowhere. My first HIM was 5.30 something and hurt like hell. My first IM was Busso 2004 and I rocketed around that in 11.45 and couldn't walk properly for 3 weeks after. Took a couple of years off and then just started training consistently with a coach - best HIM is 4.25ish in my late 40's and I've qualified for kona twice. I like doing this stuff and I like training so I'm ok giving up other stuff to do it - if I didn't make those choices I'd still be sitting here dreaming of going....

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I think qualifying for Kona is a bad motivator for doing Triathlons. Kona is a bonus. I probably would still be doing LC or any tri's for that matter if I hadnt burnt my matches training for Busso where I got my arse handed over to me just to do a faster IM.

 

However I do not think genetics have a role in qualifying for Kona. Old fart kept on telling me "you would be amazed how much natural talent can be discovered through hardwork". For a very brief period of my life I found out he was right.

 

If you are going to get too hung up on Kona - you will probably burn out yourself, lose your wife and kids and maybe job, get hit by car and become paraplegic for the rest of your life

 

 

ok maybe not the last one but you get my drift.

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Apart from ability and circumstances, qualifying for Kona also takes luck.

(Luck is just a matter of good preparation meeting opportunity).

Without actually answering your question I think gender and age group also plays a big part in assessing your chances.

This is very very true if you are right on the cusp of a qualifier

If your like me and MRS IP and are the same age as most of the guns in your age group then this makes it harder

 

I know of a bloke that is in the Middle Ages of blokes like john hill and kev ferguson and doesn't do time anywhere near these blokes who are older and younger but qualifies most years , just because where he is "aged means he gets an easier run

Having said that it is easier but still not easy

Cheers

Ivp

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I know of a bloke that is in the Middle Ages of blokes like john hill and kev ferguson and doesn't do time anywhere near these blokes who are older and younger but qualifies most years , just because where he is "aged means he gets an easier run

Having said that it is easier but still not easy

Cheers

Ivp

 

Roughly what time does he do to qualify, as i think this is my age group.

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So here's the question, how much time would you allocate to make a decision on whether you will make it?

OR

would you be happy for someone to tell you it ain't going to happen?

 

It is just not that big a deal. Train, qualify or don't, try again or don't... If not achieving a goal is going to effect you so deeply, you should probably set goals you are more likely to achieve.

 

As for a person that would tell someone a goal they were seriously striving for "ain't going to happen"... That person doesn't know shite.

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wow if achieving is making your age group Kona when under 40 then you need to look at reality. At the end of the day who are you trying to impress, your tri nerd mate.

 

how about just going out enjoying a swim, ride or run and having a few races. Why put life, family, work on hold to do a race that you will at best finish an hour behind the winner ??

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It is just not that big a deal. Train, qualify or don't, try again or don't... If not achieving a goal is going to effect you so deeply, you should probably set goals you are more likely to achieve.

 

As for a person that would tell someone a goal they were seriously striving for "ain't going to happen"... That person doesn't know shite.

Absolutely MM. I have been going for a run at lunchtimes and the amount of criticism i get is astounding. I get teased about my weight, not that i am huge, and i come to realize if i listen to them, i wouldnt train at all. I also wouldnt let anyone know, except for those really close to you, that you have a particular goal in mind.

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wow if achieving is making your age group Kona when under 40 then you need to look at reality. At the end of the day who are you trying to impress, your tri nerd mate.

 

how about just going out enjoying a swim, ride or run and having a few races. Why put life, family, work on hold to do a race that you will at best finish an hour behind the winner ??

Why do you think setting a goal like that means you're trying to impress anyone? What if that's just the motivation to keep getting you out of bed each day? Just cause I need goals to keep me motivated doesn't mean I enjoy it any less than someone just out turning the legs over.

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As for a person that would tell someone a goal they were seriously striving for "ain't going to happen"... That person doesn't know shite.

Most people that need to be told they aren't going to achieve that goal, aren't seriously striving for it in the first place. Not really.

 

 

wow if achieving is making your age group Kona when under 40 then you need to look at reality. At the end of the day who are you trying to impress, your tri nerd mate.

 

how about just going out enjoying a swim, ride or run and having a few races. Why put life, family, work on hold to do a race that you will at best finish an hour behind the winner ??

And anybody's goal of winning the reserve grade premiership in any sport needs to give it up and find something else in life.

There aren't enough endevours in this world for everybody to have a go at being the best in something. If I'd ever achieved my goal of 200m Freestyle under 2min I'd have been wrapped. Should I have sat at the pub instead?

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Absolutely MM. I have been going for a run at lunchtimes and the amount of criticism i get is astounding. I get teased about my weight, not that i am huge, and i come to realize if i listen to them, i wouldnt train at all. I also wouldnt let anyone know, except for those really close to you, that you have a particular goal in mind.

 

F*ck that. Be proud of what you are doing. Tell the world your goal, when people say no you say watch me.

 

You can set outlandish goals but be realistic about your progress.

 

I have no issues with a 13hr Ironman'r saying I'm going to KQ so long as they are realistic and when you speak to them about that goal they acknowledge it will take time.

 

 

 

In terms of contenders/pretenders I'm sitting on the boat that says most people have the ability to qualify if they commit. Unfortunately not all can commit and not all want to qualify enough to do so. This isn't a negative thing it's just a personal value that people place on things that are important to them. I know a guy who spent 5 solid years trying to qualify, couldn't get it, lost his wife and his life that existed pre triathlon. 4 years later guy still hasn't qualified, he has however got a new wife who has qualified. They now train together on trainers and treadmills and live happily ever after.

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Kona is not going to happen, and much like Downsey, I am very comfortable with that. I'm happy with where I am and what I've achieved: never thought I'd be able to do an Oly, so to cross the finish line at an IM was amazing. I had going sub 6 at HIM as a dream, so when I went sub 12 at an IM my finishing carpet leap would have looked as if I'd won the race! Every race I enter, to stand on the shore, or to bob in the water at the start is an absolute pleasure. I do want to surpass current achievements, to challenge my last time and go that little bit faster - to do so is a win for me and what I work my damned hardest for every time. It doesn't matter where the race takes place, as every race is my Kona.

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when i was young and -cough- fit, in my 20's and started with tri's and did IM, had the fleeting dillusion of what it would take to get to hawaii ... sometime late it dawned on me that all the people who were faster than me now, and still going to be the same people faster than me when im in the 60+ cat......

 

now for my next evil plan... how do i outlast them so i have a better chance

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Good question my best mate pretty much dose fark all piles on heaps of kgs at certain times and twice now says in feb ah might do kona goes up qualifies and takes his spot.and im not bullshitting when I say he dose fark all.he is just a freak.38 years old.

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I realised about 6 km into the run in my last Ironman I would not qualify. The reasons were many.

 

I wanted to qualify as opposed to actually race. That was the goal. I've been to the big island. The place is a shit hole.

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I potential have the ability, but don't have the desire. So will probably never know if i have the ability.

I've seen what it takes for other to achieve the goal of qualifing, and i am not prepared to make that commitment.

 

I participate in the sport for enjoyment and and challenge and that is enough for me.

I enjoy being a tri tourist and going around. hence why i have done a couple of Challenge IM distance events which were in interesting locations.

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I don't care if I have to qualify in the 60-64 age group. I'll get there one day

 

 

Good luck with that - just don't make the mistake of thinking it will be easier as you get older. It might look easier from your present perspective but as the body declines, the injuries and aches mount and you get progressively slower, the distance you have to do in training never gets any shorter. There is a good reasons why numbers in the older age groups are comparitively smaller. And whilst the numbers you are competing against reduce, the fast ones tend to hang around the longest.

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Good luck with that - just don't make the mistake of thinking it will be easier as you get older. It might look easier from your present perspective but as the body declines, the injuries and aches mount and you get progressively slower, the distance you have to do in training never gets any shorter. There is a good reasons why numbers in the older age groups are comparitively smaller. And whilst the numbers you are competing against reduce, the fast ones tend to hang around the longest.

I'm aware of that

 

I have a fair bit of improvement in me though

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I potential have the ability, but don't have the desire. So will probably never know if i have the ability.

I've seen what it takes for other to achieve the goal of qualifing, and i am not prepared to make that commitment.

 

I participate in the sport for enjoyment and and challenge and that is enough for me.

I enjoy being a tri tourist and going around. hence why i have done a couple of Challenge IM distance events which were in interesting locations.

Pretty much sums up my own take on it as well.
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I realised about 6 km into the run in my last Ironman I would not qualify. The reasons were many.

I wanted to qualify as opposed to actually race. That was the goal. I've been to the big island. The place is a shit hole.

Deep down everyone that's been to kona would agree.

 

The best place is in the water.

 

The town is full of unemployed drugos.

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Deep down everyone that's been to kona would agree.

The best place is in the water.

The town is full of unemployed drugos.

For me, my dream is based around the aura of the event not the location. Who knows that may change if I ever make it, but for now that is the driving force. I enjoy competing and have tried just participating but it's just not for me, not sure why I should look at reality as trek52 commented the majority of us will only ever get to compete in AG and if it means competing against the best in my AG that's not a bad goal to try and achieve as far as I'm concerned.

 

It's really difficult for me to comment on how it will affect family/lifestyle training for IM and that's why I'm taking a gradual approach to the distance.

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Deep down everyone that's been to kona would agree.

 

The best place is in the water.

 

The town is full of unemployed drugos.

So Kona is part of Weribee?

 

 

"....you're going to get better through training, not by being on the computer"

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