Jump to content

O'Grady Retires


Recommended Posts

Stuart OGrady has announced his retirement from the professional peloton today. While Australias first Classics champion, six-time Olympian and inaugural Tour Down winner had originally stated his intention to retire next year, OGrady has opted to readjust his plans on the heels of a historical Tour de France for ORICA-GreenEDGE.

 

Ive always wanted my career to end with something truly special and this years Tour de France has given me that, explained OGrady. Weve had a great race, and Im really proud of what we accomplished. Winning a stage and standing on the podium with all my teammates after the team time trial in Nice was a dream come true for me this late in my career, and to be able to defend the yellow jersey for Simon [Gerrans] and Daryl [impey] was special. Im extremely happy to have had a chance to do that one more time before I retired.

 

Having done all this, Im happy to say that Ive had my run, OGrady continued. Originally, I wanted to keep going, but Ive kept thinking that this is the year. We reached big goals as a team at the Tour, and Im proud to finish my career after an amazing experience with an incredible team. Im turning 40 very soon, and Ive realised there are things in my life that I want to prioritise. My family has helped me make this decision. Its been 23 years of top level performing and 19 years of professional racing, so its time to move on.

 

OGrady has appeared in every Tour de France since he made his debut at La Grand Boucle in 1997. He started a record-tying 17th Tour de France in Corsica in June and has 15 finishes, three stage wins and nine days in yellow to his name.

 

I have a lot of great memories to look back upon, and Im happy to pull the pin at a point where I still feel strong, healthy and competitive, said OGrady. Ive had some bad crashes along the way, but its the great moments like this years Tour de France that Ill always remember. Above all, I would like to thank all the fans, my team and my family for always cheering for me and for all the great support throughout my career. It has made me feel appreciated and has given me profound joy for simply doing my job.

 

Although OGradys personal victories have diminished in the twilight of his career, he remains a familiar figure on the front of the bunch. The South Australian played an integral role in Simon Gerrans Tour de France stage victory in Corsica and the team time trial win in Nice. He was instrumental in the teams ability to defend the yellow jersey during the first week of the Tour.

 

Its impossible to sum up everything that Stuart has given cycling, but a few things stand out, said General Manager Shayne Bannan. His commitment to the sport and to his team has been immense. Hes been a huge resource and a fantastic rider for us to work with. To have that kind of dedication at this point in his career shows a lot about his character. Hes a unique person and an incredible athlete. His experience and status in the peloton has been one of the key elements to our success.

 

We respect his decision and even if we wanted to keep him, we knew that he had been thinking this after the team time trial win, Bannan added Bowing out after a legendary career like his has been a hard decision for him, but were proud to say that he was part of starting up this team and set the bar for high ambitions from day one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 512
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

No, just rambling nonsense.   I don't think anyone has claimed that O'Grady or Zabel aren't 'hard men', or that there aren't cheats in other sports and other professions.   The only reason Stuey,

You know, its interesting, I see similarities in the professional peloton to the organisation I joined in the mid 80s.   As history has shown the organisation was entrenched with corruption at every

we all have choices trek. of course he had a choice. just like the bloke who chooses to walk out on his family because he's bored, or it gets a bit hard - granted some choices are very difficult but t

Absolutely. Personally I think Australias greatest ever cyclist in terms of his results across road and track. By an absolute mile. No one even close.

 

A friend who is pretty smart summed it up pretty well, we are heading up to the UCI congress and a new president may be elected, thus you will find a proliferation of stuff getting dragged up from the past to create the necessary noise to allow the present to duck under the radar and continue their incompetence and mismanagement unhindered rather than focus on the future.

 

He competed in a level playing field and beat the best. But then again I still think Lance won seven tours.

 

I found it a bit rich that big Mig, Merckx and Hinault got trotted out yesterday on the podium in Paris as the hallmark of sugar spice and all things nice, being pure as the driven snow as they were. Don't even start me on Lemond.

 

(see you in a hundred pages).

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is shit but he is obvioulsy implicated in this french parliment PEDs stuff. Feel sorry for him really, lets see if everyone now shows the hate to O'grady like they have to Lance, Whitey etc.....shock horror if the peoples champ Voigt is in this as well !!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend who is pretty smart summed it up pretty well, we are heading up to the UCI congress and a new president may be elected, thus you will find a proliferation of stuff getting dragged up from the past to create the necessary noise to allow the present to duck under the radar and continue their incompetence and mismanagement unhindered rather than focus on the future.

I doubt the French Senate gives a flying **** about the UCI elections.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think within a week we'll have confirmation of why.

 

I think he could have waited as these matters often drag out for years or never happen.

 

 

My thoughts exactly Ben. Announcement due on Wednesday.

 

 

It is shit but he is obvioulsy implicated in this french parliment PEDs stuff. Feel sorry for him really, lets see if everyone now shows the hate to O'grady like they have to Lance, Whitey etc.....shock horror if the peoples champ Voigt is in this as well !!!

 

Anyone care to enlighten someone who was reading the paper over the weekend only to discover after about half an hour that it was a week old...

 

A link or an executive summary would be appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt the French Senate gives a flying **** about the UCI elections.

However the people responsible for driving the information and ensuring it makes it into the appropriate hands to gain publicity might.

Link to post
Share on other sites

However the people responsible for driving the information and ensuring it makes it into the appropriate hands to gain publicity might.

It's the result of open French Senate hearings. I think Jalabert's testimony was shown live on French TV. The cycling press are all over this already, as are the mainstream press in France. There was never any chance that this wasn't going to have massive publicity.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone care to enlighten someone who was reading the paper over the weekend only to discover after about half an hour that it was a week old...

The French Senate held an inquiry into doping a while back. They intended to announce their results last week, including naming all those who tested positive during the '98 Tour. However, a delegation of cyclists met them and asked them NOT to announce during the Tour, so the agreed and are due to do so tomorrow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just read this on Cyclingnews. It's an article about a rider from that era, Philippe Gaumont.

 

http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/philippe-gaumont-the-life-and-times-of-an-enfant-terrible

 

It's quite long. And a little sad. Here are the final paragraphs:

 

"I felt and still feel immense bitterness," Menthéour tells us now, his voice still trembling with emotion, "because I thought about what an expensive price so many people have paid for cycling over the last 20 years. I thought of how, when the Festina affair happened, overnight a group of young men who were just doing what they had to do to earn a living suddenly lost all respectability, all dignity. These were guys riding 35,000 kilometres a year, people were in awe of them, and then all of a sudden they were treated like shits. And somewhere, even if they knew that they were only doing what everyone else did, those guys also had to look themselves in the mirror and feel shame, guilt, because that was what everyone was telling them that they should feel."

Menthéour takes a deep, heavy breath.

"With all of that shame, is it any wonder some of them went looking for something else, something that brought them some comfort in a life of sacrifices, of constant diets, of physical pain, and then of this vilification? I used to be fascinated by Armstrong, because I thought he was someone whose mental strength made him immune to all of this, but then I read Tyler Hamilton's book and I realised how fragile Lance was. I don't think there are many people who got through a career in cycling in those years with their mental health intact…

"Philippe could be cruel, of course he could," Menthéour continues, "but then Alpha males always are, in any context. He's not responsible for leading Frank Vandenbroucke astray; we saw later that he was quite capable of doing stupid things without any help. It was just easy to pin the blame on Philippe. Anyway, it doesn't matter now; the bottom line is that both of them are dead, as are others, and the cycling world acts as though it's OK because they were just dopers or nutters. The Ministry of Sport in France offered their condolences to Philippe's family, but the cycling world said almost nothing.

"If Philippe was a former footballer, if he was a former rugby player, he'd be walking around now with people falling at his feet, because he'd have that aura that ex-sportsmen do, except cyclists from that era. Instead Philippe's gone. And I find that really hard to take."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Or maybe not.

 

Outside of statue of limitations, can claim following doctors orders and didn't know, in good faith etc etc. Lots of outs. Neil Stephens has survived and he was part of Festina in 98.

 

As above I find it very distasteful and devious that all this old shit is coming out and selectively blackening the names of people, when the Frenchies from that era seem to have done okay even those who have confessed, like Dicky, and now Gaumonts confession is all okay as he and Frankie V have trotted off this mortal coil.

 

I wonder how Lance would have faired if was French or done something really smart and married a French chick.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If O'Grady is named on the French Senate list then lots of question for him & Green-Edge. Controversy No.2.

None of which will change what happened or the fact that he's now retired before (possibly) having to face a ban.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If O'Grady is named on the French Senate list then lots of question for him & Green-Edge. Controversy No.2.

 

6 month ban and he can come back as part of the management team. Isn't that what happened for Matthew White? Nobody seemed to mind there...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Or maybe not.

 

Outside of statue of limitations, can claim following doctors orders and didn't know, in good faith etc etc. Lots of outs. Neil Stephens has survived and he was part of Festina in 98.

 

As above I find it very distasteful and devious that all this old shit is coming out and selectively blackening the names of people, when the Frenchies from that era seem to have done okay even those who have confessed, like Dicky, and now Gaumonts confession is all okay as he and Frankie V have trotted off this mortal coil.

 

I wonder how Lance would have faired if was French or done something really smart and married a French chick.

 

I accept those arguments. However I don't think the wider sporting media & public will be so discriminating in the way they might react to news of another Aussie doper. I wasn't really making a value judgement rather speculating on the questions that might come the way of Green Edge. And this WILL raise plenty of tricky questions for O'Grady & Green Edge IF this week goes the way we suspect. Lets hope our worst suspicions are unfounded.

 

Riders concerns with fairness of list realease - http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/riders-group-repeats-opposition-to-release-of-1998-tour-epo-positives

Edited by hanging lake
Link to post
Share on other sites

6 month ban and he can come back as part of the management team. Isn't that what happened for Matthew White? Nobody seemed to mind there...

Nope, that should be off the table now I think? They had the review when everyone had a chance to come clean and recommendation of the review was that any further admissions/revelations got no leniency.

 

No mention of Stuey in the review so perhaps he kept schtum and has now been found out, or perhaps his name won't be in the French report and he really is retiring in his terms.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

From the report....

 

 

Nevertheless, there was no admission from any rider or support personnel about any past practices other than the already known cases of Matt White and Neil Stephens.

and

 

 

5.2 The Past in Relation to OGE Riders and Staff

Considering many aspects of this complex issue I recommend that OGE supports, implements where relevant and promotes to the UCI, Cycling Australia, ASADA, other relevant anti-doping authorities and other Pro-Teams to recognise the following approach:

 

1. Own Use Doping Pre-1 July 2005

- Clemency concept – no formal sanction as Use is outside the current Statute of Limitations;

- OGE acceptance of no sanction in regard to its contract with rider/staff.2.

 

2. Own Use Doping between 1 July 2005 – 31 December 2010

- Using Substantial Assistance aspect of the World Anti-Doping Code possibility of an initial sanction of 2 years reduced to 6-12 months;

- OGE to suspend team member for same amount of sanctioned time imposed by an ADO;

 

3. Own Use Doping Violation committed after 1 January 2011

- No reduction of sanction unless exceptional substantial assistance leading to the sanctioning of others and if so, only a reduction of maximum 6 months (ie 18 months minimum sanction remains);

- OGE will cancel the contract for any anti-doping rule violation sanctioned for over 6 months.

 

4. Past Use Cases of any Rider or Former Rider uncovered after 1 July 2013 that has not been previously admitted to anti-doping authorities

- Starting point 4 year sanction – Aggravating Circumstances

- OGE will cancel the contract

Stephens qualifies under 1, White under 2 and Stuey will fall under 4 if he's named in the report.

Edited by Donncha
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope, that should be off the table now I think? They had the review when everyone had a chance to come clean and recommendation of the review was that any further admissions/revelations got no leniency.

 

No mention of Stuey in the review so perhaps he kept schtum and has now been found out, or perhaps his name won't be in the French report and he really is retiring in his terms.

Maybe Stuey wont be named. Certainly an underwhelming retirement for an Aussie sporting legend. No hoopla, teary press conference. That seems to support the worst case scenario.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Or.....he retires and is not named. Forced out the door early

Under the table deals...how outrageous.

no more speculation, i will wait it out...it will be more gripping than that 100 year old race i just watched intermittently.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I cant remember who it was that told me but years ago i remember being told that ogrady had tested posiitve somewhere and it had been swept under the carpet.

Thiswas back in the lance days....

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rue89.com/sites/news/files/assets/document/2013/03/controlestourdefrance98-99.pdf

 

Here is the test results.

 

Compare each stage results with the test results above, you can work it down to a small number of riders who it could be (assuming stage winner and yellow jersey are two of those tested each stage).

 

Note the density of positive results between stages 4-6. Not many negative tests in that region.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What I've read is that none of the riders to be named in this French Senate report can be sanctioned as having a 'drugs positive', as there is no B-Sample to test. So basically they will be 'outed', but can't be penalised. Although for the few still racing, the 'outing' will probably be punishment enough...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Compare each stage results with the test results above, you can work it down to a small number of riders who it could be (assuming stage winner and yellow jersey are two of those tested each stage).

 

Note the density of positive results between stages 4-6. Not many negative tests in that region.

How are you figuring out which tests correspond to which stages? There are no dates in the file.

 

What is obvious is that '99 was a shitload cleaner than '98, which supports the anecdotal evidence that things cleaned up a bit after Festina until LA showed everyone it was business as usual.

Edited by Donncha
Link to post
Share on other sites

How are you figuring out which tests correspond to which stages? There are no dates in the file.

 

What is obvious is that '99 was a shitload cleaner than '98, which supports the anecdotal evidence that things cleaned up a bit after Festina until LA showed everyone it was business as usual.

You read Tylers book? Methinks you might be wrong on that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

How are you figuring out which tests correspond to which stages? There are no dates in the file.

 

What is obvious is that '99 was a shitload cleaner than '98, which supports the anecdotal evidence that things cleaned up a bit after Festina until LA showed everyone it was business as usual.

Took Serie Labo as a new number for each day of testing. 21 unique numbers of tests in 1998 and 23 unique IDs in 1999 (the two extra days being rest days).

 

May not be 100% accurate from days tested, but it'll be close. Make sense with 3-6 tests conducted per stage.

 

 

Remeber to take Lances 6 already known positive results out of the 1999 results. Doesn't leave many other positive results.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You read Tylers book? Methinks you might be wrong on that.

Yep, I have it here. Footnote on pg98 reads...

 

 

Perhaps more interestingly, it looks as though Armstrong was in the minority in 1999. Of the 81 urine samples taken during the 1999 Tour that were not Armstrongs, only seven tested positive for EPO, or 8.6%"

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is all Lances fault, he did something no other bike rider or team has ever done.

Yes, I think it's fair to say that the scale of bullying, intimidation, and corruption (eg. paying off the ICU to cover up tests and provide tip-offs, etc) that Lance and his team were involved in was far beyond what other riders and teams had previously managed.

Seriously, I don't think anyone has ever suggested that Lance was the only one who doped!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...