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Best Orthopaedic Surgeon in Sydney


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Kangaroo 1 v My Uncle 0

 

My uncle was riding at dusk in West Head, Sydney last night. He was coming down a hill and a kangaroo thought it would be a good opportunity to see if he could knock him off his bike by darting out right in front of him.

 

His theory was proven correct and as a result my uncle has a broken collarbone and shattered shoulder bone. Plus some lovely grazes and cuts over his body. Most distressing, i am not sure of the condition of the bike.

 

Just putting out the feeler's for any recommendations for any top of the line ortho's in Sydney. For my uncle keeping fit and active is his passion as he has entered semi retirement. So he has opened the cheque book and his open for any recommendations. He is privately insured.

 

He was in Manly Hospital but there is talk of him going to Royal North Shore, but he would go anywhere if it meant that he could deal with someone who is top of his game and allow him to swim again.

 

Thanks

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Dr Tom Cross (Stadium Medical Centre) was my treating doctor whilst my surgeon was Dr Mark Perko at the Mater Clinic. he is a shoulder specialist.

the combo of the two was great.

there will be many medicos on this forum who will recommend others, but the combo of a treating doctor who other than the medical aspect, understands sport and the mindset and requirements of sportsmen ( he is the Waratahs doctor ) who refers to a great specialist surgeon is a winning combo to me.

do not let your treatment be directed by either the ER/Casualty doctor nor your general family doctor.

 

speedy recovery.

 

btw, I had an AC rebuild

Edited by AVAGO
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Dr Tom Cross (Stadium Medical Centre) was my treating doctor whilst my surgeon was Dr Mark Perko at the Mater Clinic. he is a shoulder specialist.

the combo of the two was great.

there will be many medicos on this forum who will recommend others, but the combo of a treating doctor who other than the medical aspect, understands sport and the mindset and requirements of sportsmen ( he is the Waratahs doctor ) who refers to a great specialist surgeon is a winning combo to me.

do not let your treatment be directed by either the ER/Casualty doctor nor your general family doctor.

 

speedy recovery.

 

btw, I had an AC rebuild

Given the almost impossibility of moving between area health services in NSW, this looks like a smart recommendation. Unless he gets a discharge and then re-starts the process.

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Given the almost impossibility of moving between area health services in NSW, this looks like a smart recommendation. Unless he gets a discharge and then re-starts the process.

 

Really? That is bad news when it happens. We arrange transfers (and recover payment!) for cross area patients all the time. If the crash happened at west head then Will's uncle may be in luck...

 

I second Prof. David Sonnabend, who is not in any way at all arrogant or surgeon like in approach. He also see patients at RNS as well as his private practice.

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  • 5 years later...

Tom Cross is a good one to visit. As is Dr Ameer Ibrahim. These guys are sports doctors, they have great relationships with the best knee surgeons in Sydney. www.bestkneesurgeon.com.au

And they know all the latest rehab, post-surgery rehab plans because they work with athletes (like the Roosters and Socceroos). What happens after surgery is just as important, The surgeons kind of leave you in the lurch a little after they do their handiwork, so my tip is see Dr Cross or Ibrahim first to direct the whole treatment plan.

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Tom Cross is a good one to visit. As is Dr Ameer Ibrahim. These guys are sports doctors, they have great relationships with the best knee surgeons in Sydney. www.bestkneesurgeon.com.au

And they know all the latest rehab, post-surgery rehab plans because they work with athletes (like the Roosters and Socceroos). What happens after surgery is just as important, The surgeons kind of leave you in the lurch a little after they do their handiwork, so my tip is see Dr Cross or Ibrahim first to direct the whole treatment plan.

 

Should this have a disclaimer DrBen?

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Dr Tom Cross (Stadium Medical Centre) was my treating doctor whilst my surgeon was Dr Mark Perko at the Mater Clinic. he is a shoulder specialist.

the combo of the two was great.

there will be many medicos on this forum who will recommend others, but the combo of a treating doctor who other than the medical aspect, understands sport and the mindset and requirements of sportsmen ( he is the Waratahs doctor ) who refers to a great specialist surgeon is a winning combo to me.

do not let your treatment be directed by either the ER/Casualty doctor nor your general family doctor.

 

speedy recovery.

 

btw, I had an AC rebuild

Agree with Tom Cross as the Doctor. Fantastic. But real hard to see now (busy) as he is the Swans medico. I'd call and see what they can advise.

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Tom Cross is a good one to visit. As is Dr Ameer Ibrahim. These guys are sports doctors, they have great relationships with the best knee surgeons in Sydney. www.bestkneesurgeon.com.au

And they know all the latest rehab, post-surgery rehab plans because they work with athletes (like the Roosters and Socceroos). What happens after surgery is just as important, The surgeons kind of leave you in the lurch a little after they do their handiwork, so my tip is see Dr Cross or Ibrahim first to direct the whole treatment plan.

 

Check out the video in that link where he is trimming out a osteochondral lesion, then punching holes/ripping trenches in the end of the femur bone (known as micro-fracture). Then read the description in the Youtube version where it says 'knee replacement expected within 10yrs'.

 

You gotta wonder if ripping up the femur like that is just away of ensuring the OS makes a nice pile of $'s in the future with the knee replacement? Removing the loose bit of cartilage I can live with, cos that is just going to keep chaffing the end of the femur. But is then further ripping into the femur cartilage the most conservative way to go? I know the theory is that ripping up the cartilage causes healing with hyaline cartilage (a sort of second-rate cartilage) but it makes me wonder if just leaving it to heal naturally, taking it easy for a few years, and careful muscle strengthening to take the load off the joint would be smarter....and stave off a knee replacement.

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Gee, this thread has really come back from the dead. Tom Cross has been around for a long time - must be getting on.

 

When my ACL went I got Sam Sorrenti and he was great. 23 years ago and never an issue with it since. I'm pretty sure he's retired now but he was getting into stem cell injections towards the end - Hyphen had her knee done by him and was amazed at the results.

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Gee, this thread has really come back from the dead. Tom Cross has been around for a long time - must be getting on.

 

When my ACL went I got Sam Sorrenti and he was great. 23 years ago and never an issue with it since. I'm pretty sure he's retired now but he was getting into stem cell injections towards the end - Hyphen had her knee done by him and was amazed at the results.

Tom is his 40's I think. His dad was the famous knee surgeon.

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Check out the video in that link where he is trimming out a osteochondral lesion, then punching holes/ripping trenches in the end of the femur bone (known as micro-fracture). Then read the description in the Youtube version where it says 'knee replacement expected within 10yrs'.

 

You gotta wonder if ripping up the femur like that is just away of ensuring the OS makes a nice pile of $'s in the future with the knee replacement? Removing the loose bit of cartilage I can live with, cos that is just going to keep chaffing the end of the femur. But is then further ripping into the femur cartilage the most conservative way to go? I know the theory is that ripping up the cartilage causes healing with hyaline cartilage (a sort of second-rate cartilage) but it makes me wonder if just leaving it to heal naturally, taking it easy for a few years, and careful muscle strengthening to take the load off the joint would be smarter....and stave off a knee replacement.

re Dr Tom. I had a fracture in my femur right down in knee area (SONK knee). It was touch and go for a while if I would need a knee replacement and / or ever be able to run again. Four months on crutches / no weight bearing and good advice for the next six months and I was back racing. Eighteen months post break I qualified for Sunny Coast 70.3's.

He will do me.

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