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Heart Rate worry


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On the weekend I purchased a Polar Heart rate monitor. I did the fitness test to set it up and decided to take it out on my long Sunday run which was actually a long ride / run as I missed my Saturday ride (probably a rookie mistake).

Anyway I set the monitor to long easy and set off. The range it set for me was about 117 to 135. I found on the ride it was almost impossible to stay in this range. I would have to stop riding down hills for it to get close. Jumping off the bike and I took to the run at what felt like a really easy pace and found my heart rate would average around 175. I was running in a hilly area but even on the long downhill (taking it very easy) it would only get as low as 165 then climb to 185-190 on the uphill. It really didn't feel like I was going much harder than I used to when doing 4 hour training runs for the marathon. The total session was about 2 hours with the ride average speed at 26kph for an hour with the run about 6min k's for an hour. With average heart rate 162 for the total session

Is this something I should be worried about or do some people just operate at a higher heart rate?

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My heart rates have always been higher than the polar set ones. My max is 209 running(max observed) and polar tells me it is in the 180s. For me, 117 is a semi brisk walk. My resting is in the mid 40s. 150bpm fresh is 6 min kays. 32 years male. Dunno if that helps but I wouldn't get worried about not being in the watch determined range.

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Is this something I should be worried about or do some people just operate at a higher heart rate?

 

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Welcome to the exact reason why I generally train without one. I ended up spending so much time stressing about why its so high or not where I was expecting it to be that I wasn't enjoying training anymore.

 

Best thing that ever happened to me was losing the HRM watch.

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Mapik

 

I am 33 and have a HR max of 214 and resting of mid 40's. I too was concerned and went to my Dr, he Insisted that everything was ok and that no two people heart rates are the same. Not happy with this I pursued a cardiologist and had some testing….still no problem found. The cardiologist said I will do more damage worrying about my HR then actually raising it through training etc…

 

I still use my polar for my own target HR etc.

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Yep, im the same. My 75% is about 155bmp which is a VERY slow jog for me. I can hold 165-175bpm for a 2hour run without blowing up. Running my HR is higher than riding....

I dont go off the 75% stuff, i go on what I know works and set my target HR's based on that.

I'm the Polar opposite (pun intended) of AJ. I love training and racing with a HRM. I know when to back off and when im bludging. Great to see improvement over time also.

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My personal experience says that when you suspect your HR is too high you're generally right. That's when you try to find all the excuses in the world to justify that you are different than others and hence the higher averages. Specially when you realise that if you have to run to your actual 60-70% range you'd be doing 7.5km/min runs whilst you could run a "comfortable" 5mins/km on "pretty much the same" effort.

 

There is also this guy who used to be famous triathlete, won a few races in that island off the US west coast and here is his view on the subject.

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Is great to see your speed change at a certain heart rate as u get fitter. Last year training on my own, try to work on Mark Allens advice and sticking below about 155 for the base training, didnt really see this do much, probably wasnt doing enough. USed to plod along for a couple hours at the HR easily enough.

After some proper training with a squad this year, thought I had better get some base miles in, strapped the HR monitor on started running at about the same pace I though, and HR was 10 beats lower. :lol:

Bugger had to run a whole heap faster to get it up to 155

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Old runners joke: Did you hear about the Triathlete that was on his way to a PB until his heart rate monitor told him to slow down? :lol:

 

Don't use any preset information on a HRM - everyone is different, to a surprising degree. One 40 Y.O. rookie in our cycling group would regularly be up in the 190s for example. You should initially use your HRM to learn about yourself and set the framework for your training. Once you do, it can become an invaluable tool in both training and racing.

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One 40 Y.O. rookie in our cycling group would regularly be up in the 190s for example.

 

How are the girl's blouses? Do they miss me towing them around to Mordi and back? Going to have to work out how to get back down and win the BP sprint. Wish them a merry Christmas for me Pete.

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Not to mention its not out of the question for your HR to fluctuate with age.

 

I used to easily ride in the 150s or higher, but now this is only if I'm climbing. I did a hard 70km effort on the flat on Sunday and apart from a few sprints my average HR was 139. Rarely will I get over 160 on the bike, even if I'm sprinting or climbing.

 

Use your HR monitor as a relative measure, work out what HR you can maintain over certain distances and terrain and use it as a rough guide. For instance I knew that on Sunday if I rode at 150 bpm that I wouldn't be able to maintain it.

 

At one stage I was riding into the wind and working hard and the HR was only sitting around 120bpm. However it felt tough, at times like these there needs to be an off buton on a HR monitor.

 

I know plenty of people who have Max HRs 30-40 times higher than mine, everyone is different so don't stress about it.

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Guest The Grinch
Old runners joke: Did you hear about the Triathlete that was on his way to a PB until his heart rate monitor told him to slow down?  :lol:

 

Don't use any preset information on a HRM - everyone is different, to a surprising degree. One 40 Y.O. rookie in our cycling group would regularly be up in the 190s for example. You should initially use your HRM to learn about yourself and set the framework for your training. Once you do, it can become an invaluable tool in both training and racing.

 

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Now see, there's your problem Pete.

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As a brownman-in-training, i feel that the shackle-like wrist band of a HRM watch is indicative of the attempted oppression of the brownman, by the whiteman....in the whitemans sport of triathlon....

 

I will not be handcuffed (unless they're fluffy.. :lol: ), and refuse to be shackled to the weight of mediocrity that the whiteman attempts to burden me with, by telling me that my heart rate is "too high"....

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How are the girl's blouses?  Do they miss me towing them around to Mordi and back?  Going to have to work out how to get back down and win the BP sprint.  Wish them a merry Christmas for me Pete.

 

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:lol::lol::D:D

Thanks mate I'll pass on your regards. All best to you and Stace and the family. Speaking of which, great effort from Stace volunteering at Shep in that heat with her arm in a cast - she's got the "right stuff"!

 

Now see, there's your problem Pete

 

I have so many problems another 1 or 2 probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference! :D

OT for a moment - a few of the lads might be heading down for a Footscray crit tomorrow - you in?!

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Guest The Grinch
How are the girl's blouses?  Do they miss me towing them around to Mordi and back?  Going to have to work out how to get back down and win the BP sprint.  Wish them a merry Christmas for me Pete.

 

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:lol::lol::D:D

Thanks mate I'll pass on your regards. All best to you and Stace and the family. Speaking of which, great effort from Stace volunteering at Shep in that heat with her arm in a cast - she's got the "right stuff"!

 

Now see, there's your problem Pete

 

I have so many problems another 1 or 2 probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference! :D

OT for a moment - a few of the lads might be heading down for a Footscray crit tomorrow - you in?!

 

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Noooooo... I do not have a road bike

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I wouldn't worry about how it compares to theoretical averages. I use mine based on experience of how my body performs.

 

At the Elwood tri the other week in bloody hot temp I realised my HR at the start of the run was 20bpm higher than normal at that stage of a race. So that for me was a big warning bell to slow down.

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Also be aware that the standard deviation for the "average" heart rate for your age is +/- 12 beats per minute!, so perhaps you are 2 or 3 stardard deviations from the mean, varying your calculations by 2 to 3 x 12 bpm for each zone calculation...

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Have stuck to the MAP protocol (as per http://www.duathlon.com/articles/1460 ) for about six weeks now. Started out really slow - now still start my long runs slow (about 6:30/k pace) for the first half hour, after that can sit on around 4:30/k pace for a couple of hours - feels great. Used to think it was just that I had a high HR (max is 220) - was actually an efficiency problem.

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Mooze,

 

are you saying that you can sit on 4:30 pace and still be within your HR zone.

 

Interesting article, but Mark Allen is just one athlete (admittedly a superb one), but you read through Greg Welch's book and he certainly didn't train this way and yet his results are pretty impressive.

 

I definately believe that you need to teach your body to burn fat and you need to get a certain amount of mileage in and of course its important to not train hard all of the time. I've read in the past pyramid type approaches, where the pinacle is your threshold amount and the base is your long aerobic training. Can't remember the exact percentages but threshold was only a small amount of the total.

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Mooze,

 

are you saying that you can sit on 4:30 pace and still be within your HR zone.

 

Interesting article, but Mark Allen is just one athlete (admittedly a superb one), but you read through Greg Welch's book and he certainly didn't train this way and yet his results are pretty impressive.

 

I definately believe that you need to teach your body to burn fat and you need to get a certain amount of mileage in and of course its important to not train hard all of the time. I've read in the past pyramid type approaches, where the pinacle is your threshold amount and the base is your long aerobic training. Can't remember the exact percentages but threshold was only a small amount of the total.

 

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Welsh also drank beer. In that book somewhere he makes the point he basically knew his heart rate and could control it. Based on that I wonder how much of his training was done the same as Allen. It makes sense that your efficiency is increased and if works for the unfit (think about it as they get fit) it will continue to work for the fit, though in saying that everyone is different and limits will be found.

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Yep can sit 4:30 in the HR zone. My biggest problem is the first half hour - at the moment seems due to flexibility and muscle memory - soon as the muscle's are loose enough to maintain correct technique my pace just improves dramatically.

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Everyone's heart rates - max/AT/AeT are vastly different. The old 220-age deal is usually so far off the mark it's not worth referring to at all.

 

If you are using a HR monitor in training, then do yourself a favour and go get some testing done so that you know your:

 

Anaerobic Threshold (AT) and your true Max Heart Rate.

 

Otherwise, you are wasting your time.

 

And be smart about how you use your HR monitor. Never wear it for hard "max" type sessions (ie running intervals) other than maybe out of interest. When you do these sessions, they are just meant to be "HARD". If you are being governed by a HR monitor, you're probably not going "HARD" enough. And HR readings in these sesssions are affected by too many other factors anyway to be worth paying attention to.

 

I like to use a HR monitor on the windtrainer (keeps me honest -it's easy to cheat on a WT) and on long runs (stops me going too fast). I would never use one in any type of race as a race is about sitting on whatever limit your body allows you to sit on, on that given day. Some days you can go "harder" than others.

 

Anyway - I could write all day on this topic ... and as with anything, what works for one person will not work for another. But the point that applies to EVERYONE is - if you haven't had your own HR thresholds and maxes measured, then you're not using your HR monitor effectively.

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