Jump to content

Injury


Guest Hitman

Recommended Posts

Having tried different forms of treatment over the years it is interesting listening to the various comments of various practitioners thoughts on each other.

 

In particular the different views of those involved in the natural therapies as opposed to the more conventional means. eg chiropractic vs physio

 

Interested in hearing others thoughts

Link to post
Share on other sites

Timing, Hitman, timing. :lol: Besides explaining why you are still single :D, you put this topic up in the evening, when all the chiro's, physio's etc have gone off to bed or are otherwise engaged.

 

Just re-read your post HM, withdrawing my comments on Chiro's. (Edited Out)

 

Natural therapy. Very dubious, not open mined, not willing to even try. Defer to others here.

Edited by kamalarrowsmith
Link to post
Share on other sites

* www.myotherapy.com.au

 

* Parkside sports physio - Parkie goes the extra mile was very helpful in getting over my recent repair job. Currently held together with rubber bands and staples, but getting there..

 

Signed injured old crock, fast becoming made up of artificial body parts....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one Jabbs, Parky's an ace and a true friend to so many people here, sadly we never met....and Parky never pushes the envelope or calls his own number, that's why he's cool.

 

But re-read the topic as I did, HM's not asking that, he's asking about alternative therapy if I read him right

Link to post
Share on other sites

Myotherapy a very good form of massage, combining a number of elements of pressure point, heat and deep tissue massage, concentrating on body alignment and I have found it very effective. Helped me to race (way back when) even when my hip was starting to deteriorate leading to eventual replacement.

 

Helped correct many issues such as effective leg length discrepancies (due to hip imbalance etc), sciatica etc post surgery and broke down scar tissue before it had a chance to turn into concrete.. the kind of 'deep' therapy/massage one gets and goes home and goes to sleep after. Bit of a workout but worth it.

 

Physios (like many tradesmen) good ones and bad ones, find a good one.

 

Combination of 'alternative' and conventional therapies best. Conventional medicine is very much an old mates act business and a closed shop, many times to the detriment of the patient. Same thing with surgeons, do yer bloody homework, big potential for disaster there if you dont....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Having tried different forms of treatment over the years it is interesting listening to the various comments of various practitioners thoughts on each other.

 

In particular the different views of those involved in the natural therapies as opposed to the more conventional means.  eg chiropractic vs physio

 

Interested in hearing others thoughts

 

173597[/snapback]

 

 

 

I tend to stay on the side of traditional western medicine however there are things like Chinese medicine, which I might add has been in practice for a lot longer (the Chinese claim 5000 yrs - I don't know about that), that have stood up to scientific investigation. Acupuncture is now practiced by a few MB BS (MDs for our American friends) in Australia, in fact there were moves here by the medical profession to have it regulated so that only a doctor could use it - talk about turf wars.

 

My wife sees a chinese apothecary for herbal concoctions. She is healthy. Chinese medical practitioners are critical of western medicine because of some of the undesirable side effects of some of the treatments. Anyone who has had or had a friend that has gone through chemo will have no trouble understanding this point is well founded.

 

I believe university qualified naturopaths have something to offer as they do a fair have to go through training and academic tuition. Homeopathy sounds like a total joke to me, the idea of folding a substance through water many many times until it is practically so dilute it is questionable it even exists, however the theory is that it leaves and "energy signature or form" in the water which has healing properties, I find totally ludicrous. What about all the other impurities that were present at some stage, won't their energy cancel out the important energy form?

 

Anyway, I thing for the treatment of certain conditions and diseases, inflamation and perhaps some pain control, Chinese medicine, acupuncture and naturopathy may have some value, however for orthopaedic and muscular and soft tissue shearing problems western medicine and physiotherapy is superior. Car accidents and other emergency treatment, western medicine and its surgery based solutions are far superior. So for the majority of sports related problems I'd stick closely with western medicine, though acupuncture is known to be good for pain control.

 

Western medical practitioners probably would not have a good word to say about any alternative therapy but that is a bias built in to their training and they tend to regard anything without a proper scientific basis with suspicion, and that is probably a healthy thing.

 

Anyone calling themselves a wellbeing and holistic healing practioner, a faith healer, a swami, a guru, offering crystal magic and spiritual healing beware, they will only help you lose weight around the hip pocket. The amazing thing is they know how to charge too much more expensive than your local GP and no chance of a medicare rebate. There is a whole industry on Sydney's northern beaches it starts at Narrabeen with cosmetic enlightenment practitioners and their mud wraps and absolutely flourishes up in the epi-centre of the insular peninsular and wellness universe, Avalon - a place somewhere on the east coast of Australia :lol::D

 

Here is an excellent site for debunking quackery http://www.quackwatch.org/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, many of the comments made echo my sentiments also. I don't particularly rule anything out although some are certainly more believable than others.

 

Relationships to me K are much like a game a golf. The choice of a pitching wedge when in excess of 200m to the pin is always going to come up short, unless your Tiger Woods or John Holmes take your pick.

 

How's slowman's word count goin?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ussually a big sceptic of the alternative stuff, but recently had a biocomm session done (helps identify food intolerances/allergies without needles) and that picked up on me having coeliacs disease (intolerant of gluten and some other wheat products) when a blood test for similar had come back negative. Slightly more invovled and thorough western procedure proved blood test wrong and biocomm findings to be correct.

 

Still wont trust a lot of the other stuff though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

im all for 'alternate' or as they are called these days 'complamentary therapies'

i rate acupunture ALOT and have it done regulary.

I dont know if a naturopath can help much with injury, perhaps you are deficient on a mineral essential to muscle repair or the like. My brother and gf are both university trained naturopaths and know the limits of their chosen field. I dont like pretty much all of the GP's ive ever come in contact with as they are too quick to whip out a pad and give you drugs.

I recently saw a non family member naturopath about my tiredness. doc reckoned i was depressed and i had a box of some hard core any sadness drug ready to rock and roll. I thought it was something else. Wouldnt you know it, its the stuff i eat. Body cant handle highly processed wheat based products or milk plus im massivly reactive to sugar again in its highly processed form (fructose im all good with)

So after 2 weeks just avoiding these foods i was sleeping better, feeling happier, working and training 80% more. Not once did the doc ask about what i ate or the original cause. In my experience the doc's ive seen are all about bandaid approaches, not getting to the cause and prevention. Which is the hub or chinese med and complimentary med.

 

Im doing pilates at the moment, and also rate it very highly. Not only do you get to be in a room mostly with very flexable chicks! it makes u strong in the core and works muscles i though never existed. Swim, bike and run use alot, but not all muscles. They get weak... more injury prone.

 

thats my pov anyway, everyone is diff of course!

Wish u the best with finding out what the feck is happening. being kinda build like a brick shithouse has its advantages that i dont really get injured

 

edited to say sorry for poor spelling

Edited by Andy
Link to post
Share on other sites
I recently saw a non family member naturopath about my tiredness. doc reckoned i was depressed and i had a box of some hard core any sadness drug ready to rock and roll. I thought it was something else. Wouldnt you know it, its the stuff i eat. Body cant handle highly processed wheat based products or milk plus im massivly reactive to sugar again in its highly processed form (fructose im all good with)

 

Typical GP, whipping out the drugs.

 

The testimony on the sugar reaction, good for you Andy, but it doesn't prove anything in my book.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Relationships to me K are much like a game a golf. The choice of a pitching wedge when in excess of 200m to the pin is always going to come up short,

 

So much wisdom, so clear, so succint.........but still can't get what the Hitman wants to say.

 

RS??? Whadya think?

Link to post
Share on other sites
who me?  :lol:

 

Well i had a hot chicky lined up for him at Noosa but i couldnt get them in the same room together. She was perfect for him.

 

173678[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

RS/K2

 

golf,echo,tango

 

foxtrot,uniform,charlie,kilo,echo,delta

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys theres a story on sixty reporters about this very subject tomorrow night.

 

173633[/snapback]

 

 

 

 

 

Good call sprocket. The story of Mr Perrett and co taking advantage of cancer sufferers was disgraceful and only proves regulation is required in the industry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched the 60 minutes special. As usual an arrogant and sniggering Richard Carlton asking some poor sod who heads up the Naturopaths professional association as though he'd let this Perrett character loose, who was not even a naturopath. Poor sod probably wasn't even the president at the time Perrett was admitted as a member.

 

As I said before I think the university tutored and trained naturopaths actually are practitioners practicing a discipline based on science. Carlton rubbished all "traditional medicine" and "alternative medicine" based on a couple of rip-off scam artists. Would he have pillaried the medical fraternity if some imposters had posed as doctors and done the same thing? I think the report was pretty unfair as there are naturopaths that have been trained, properly qualified, are professional and do a good job. To insinuate the whole lot are crooks is wrong.

 

Carlton obviously did some good investigative work to show that the admission procedures at the time must have been lax, by being able to produce the letter used as reference for Perrett's admission, and the referee did not actually exist. Essentially though the report was made emotive by showing the suffering of individuals that were preyed upon and then he went after scapegoats sensationalising as he went and insinuating they were entirely to blame for these scam artists. Good work Richard!

 

I think there already are regulations as set out by their society rules but even the AMA's rules don't stop some doctors pretending they are more qualified than they really are. Like that crazy GP that was disfiguring women doing breast implants and he had no qualifications as a cosmetic surgeon.

Edited by Slowman
Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...