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Time management

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30 minutes ago, Greyman said:

One thing you will find is no one will agree on what is the best time of day to train. Simply because we all live in different climatic conditions. 

Agree 100% with what you say. However, being properly prepared for the cold temperatures of Winter mornings means buying the right clothes to be out there in. My daughter lives in Copenhagen and runs all year round, but she has proper thermals and protective clothes ( Ok, it doesn't protect you lungs ) and it makes a big difference. Especially when you use base layers and stay comfortable.

Surviving a Melbourne or even Hobart Winter is possible in the right kit. I ran in the US earlier this year at -15 on a few days, but usually waited until it was at least zero. The other risk associated with Winter is ice on the road.

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4 hours ago, Peter said:

Oh please. 

4.30pm  feels like 3.7c  

 

A8EFD7A3-C51A-4781-BF79-0F97903A51BD.jpeg

 

1 hour ago, FatPom said:

hahahahahahahaha

29/05:00am 5.1 2.5 4.2 94 0.4 WSW 7 9 4 5 1013.9 1013.9 0.0
29/04:30am 4.3

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3 minutes ago, CootaGC said:

 

29/05:00am 5.1 2.5 4.2 94 0.4 WSW 7 9 4 5 1013.9 1013.9 0.0
29/04:30am 4.3

As I’ve said many times.  You guys on here are pretty clueless about really in training in real cold. There is a world of difference to getting excited about an early morning that starts at -2 but gets up to 10 by lunchtime, than there is about a day that starts at +2  and stays there all day, doesn’t get light until 9am and is wet.

Rinse and repeat for 4 months.

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6 hours ago, AP said:

This is clearly the answer but he doesn't want this answer - he wants you to sympathise with him 

I rarely set evening sessions for athletes - maybe a bit of core work or stretching - I would set morning only sessions 95% of the time - it allows as "normal a family life as possible" in the evenings

If you want the prize you will get up early - like they say about the early bird 😏 

That really isnt helpful or a very nice thing to post. 

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9 minutes ago, FatPom said:

As I’ve said many times.  You guys on here are pretty clueless about really in training in real cold. There is a world of difference to getting excited about an early morning that starts at -2 but gets up to 10 by lunchtime, than there is about a day that starts at +2  and stays there all day, doesn’t get light until 9am and is wet.

Rinse and repeat for 4 months.

And you get excited about a hot day of 25 top, when it's 40 here by 9 am..

Each to their own demise! 

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5 hours ago, softy said:

This could be the case .... but, he's right.

If any of us have commitments that make sessions difficult in the afternoon, you have to get up earlier. There's something satisfying, knowing that you have run a half marathon before work, when other plonkers are dreading their session after work - or they don't do any exercise at all.

No sorry, he isnt 'right' , poor judgement & bad manners this time around

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1 minute ago, Surfer said:

No sorry, he isnt 'right' , poor judgement & bad manners this time around

Standard for him. 

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10 minutes ago, FatPom said:

As I’ve said many times.  You guys on here are pretty clueless about really in training in real cold. There is a world of difference to getting excited about an early morning that starts at -2 but gets up to 10 by lunchtime, than there is about a day that starts at +2  and stays there all day, doesn’t get light until 9am and is wet.

Rinse and repeat for 4 months.

All good I’m not complaining.  I did live for 20 years in Southwest NSW where the temperatures on many days began at less than zero and didn’t get much over 10 in winter.  Unfortunately the 10 was while I was at work so training was usually at the coldest time of day.  Not unusual to have fog and/or rain on many of those days, the fog sometimes not lifting till midday.  Sheepskin mittens, balaclavas etc were the order of the day.  And then in summer maximums usually around 35-40.  As many of the comments/suggestion in this thread have suggested early morning starts I was just saying it can get at least cool by your standards in Qld at 5am in the morning.  

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1 hour ago, BarryBevan said:

5 am is plenty early, much earlier then you are an exception bed by 9 gets 8 hours sleep

To be absolutely clear, the key bit in pieman’s post was how what superficially looks like a 7-8 hour sleep window becomes much less, due to dealing with multiple little people getting him up during the night. Then, notwithstanding he “wanted it enough” to get out the door on ~3 to 4 hours sleep, one of his little ones woke up despite his best ninja impersonation (ie running contrary to the “I can be gone from 4am to 7am and no one notices” line).

What do the wake up early because you want it pundits suggest pieman should do (assuming the answer isn’t for him to treat sorting out his little people as his spouse’s job)?

Edited by trilobite

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9 hours ago, Toolish said:

I was going tto post this in the supportive spouse thread but thought I might be better off splitting it out.  I have been out of tri's for a couple of years and while my wife is very supportive and knows it makes me a better person, but I am struggling with the time management of it all.

I have a 8 y.o and a 10y.o.

Standard day I work 7-4:30, short commute.  Normally we are eating at 5:30, takes about an hour so that is 6:30.  Then it is baths or showers for the kids which makes it 7pm.  7-8 is an hour of family games, either video gaming together or board games.  Kids are usually in bed at 8:30 and asleep by 9.

If I start a session at 8:15 say (as they are going to bed) and go for an hour, then that makes it 9:15 but I take about 90 min after a session to be able to get to be and sleep so that makes in 10:45, then up at 6 so best case is 7ish hours sleep.

Otherwise I go to bed when they do at 9pm, get my 8 hours, up at 5 to finish a session by 6 and get ready for work.

Both of these options leave no time for us as a couple or any other hobbies and that is only 5 hours training though the week.

Anyone else have a similar life circumstance, and if so how do you fit training in.  Note lunch training is not an option.

 

Almost exact same scenario as us but younger brats  (mine are 2 and 5).

I work a 9-5 now, short commute. Missus works as well.

I do maybe 5 training sessions a week (cause im being slack at the moment)  missus does about 5 - 7 per week.

Use every opportunity amd schedule things. 

Wife is better at mornings than me so she'll do one or two mornings a week, which leaves me to get kids up and fed etc.  I mostly do evenings.  Some evening wife will do an early gym session (5 till 6.30) whilst i do kids dinner.  Then ill run (6.30 till 7.30) and be home for bedtime stories. Other evenings wife does dinner and we eat together. Each day is varied depending on work, weather, training etc. 

Weekends we try to incorporate as much into the day as we can ... ie if we are going to the beach one of us will run to the beach and the other will drive.  Sometimes one of us will run home....

We also have no training/rest days where we just do stuf with the kids.

 

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7 hours ago, BogFrog said:

I've never met you, so I'll try not to pass judgement on you, but just so you know, online, you often come across as a condescending d!ck with a superiority complex...

I completely disagree. AP is right. Too many people give a good excuse as to why they can’t do something. How about trying to find a way to do something instead.

Now...... two things pretty obvious. Toolish needs to define quality time with wife and kids. Everyone’s definition is different of course....... but is what your doing really quality time. The other is..... 8 hours sleep. This is the reason why people take so long to get to sleep. They already have too much. 8 hours...... that for kids.

IronPo looks to get about 5-6 in order to get what he needs to get done. And I bet when his head hits the pillow he is out like a light.

Me.... I never sit still. I do shift work 12.5 hour shifts. When I do night shift I get the most of every day and I would at best get a maxim of 5 hours sleep. And I am out like a light as soon as my head hits the pillow. 

Example. Finish at 07:00am. At pool by 8am. Home by 9 or 9:30 depending on how far I swim. Breakfast. A ride or run. + chores. In bed by 12/12:30...... wake up 17:30. Shower and off to work.

When I do dayshifts the days are different but still get stuff in outside of 05:30 - 20:00.

 

 

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6 hours ago, CootaGC said:

All good I’m not complaining.  I did live for 20 years in Southwest NSW where the temperatures on many days began at less than zero and didn’t get much over 10 in winter.  Unfortunately the 10 was while I was at work so training was usually at the coldest time of day.  Not unusual to have fog and/or rain on many of those days, the fog sometimes not lifting till midday.  Sheepskin mittens, balaclavas etc were the order of the day.  And then in summer maximums usually around 35-40.  As many of the comments/suggestion in this thread have suggested early morning starts I was just saying it can get at least cool by your standards in Qld at 5am in the morning.  

Yeah it’s all relative mate. You should see me ‘operate’ in anything over 28 :surrender:

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4 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

I completely disagree. AP is right. Too many people give a good excuse as to why they can’t do something. How about trying to find a way to do something instead.

Now...... two things pretty obvious. Toolish needs to define quality time with wife and kids. Everyone’s definition is different of course....... but is what your doing really quality time. The other is..... 8 hours sleep. This is the reason why people take so long to get to sleep. They already have too much. 8 hours...... that for kids.

IronPo looks to get about 5-6 in order to get what he needs to get done. And I bet when his head hits the pillow he is out like a light.

Me.... I never sit still. I do shift work 12.5 hour shifts. When I do night shift I get the most of every day and I would at best get a maxim of 5 hours sleep. And I am out like a light as soon as my head hits the pillow. 

Example. Finish at 07:00am. At pool by 8am. Home by 9 or 9:30 depending on how far I swim. Breakfast. A ride or run. + chores. In bed by 12/12:30...... wake up 17:30. Shower and off to work.

When I do dayshifts the days are different but still get stuff in outside of 05:30 - 20:00.

 

 

That’s nice you have no family and kids to worry about. No excuses for you indeed!

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6 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

I completely disagree. AP is right. Too many people give a good excuse as to why they can’t do something. How about trying to find a way to do something instead.

Now...... two things pretty obvious. Toolish needs to define quality time with wife and kids. Everyone’s definition is different of course....... but is what your doing really quality time. The other is..... 8 hours sleep. This is the reason why people take so long to get to sleep. They already have too much. 8 hours...... that for kids.

IronPo looks to get about 5-6 in order to get what he needs to get done. And I bet when his head hits the pillow he is out like a light.

Me.... I never sit still. I do shift work 12.5 hour shifts. When I do night shift I get the most of every day and I would at best get a maxim of 5 hours sleep. And I am out like a light as soon as my head hits the pillow. 

Example. Finish at 07:00am. At pool by 8am. Home by 9 or 9:30 depending on how far I swim. Breakfast. A ride or run. + chores. In bed by 12/12:30...... wake up 17:30. Shower and off to work.

When I do dayshifts the days are different but still get stuff in outside of 05:30 - 20:00.

 

 

Can we put this in trigold please..

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18 hours ago, Toolish said:

I was going tto post this in the supportive spouse thread but thought I might be better off splitting it out.  I have been out of tri's for a couple of years and while my wife is very supportive and knows it makes me a better person, but I am struggling with the time management of it all.

I have a 8 y.o and a 10y.o.

Standard day I work 7-4:30, short commute.  Normally we are eating at 5:30, takes about an hour so that is 6:30.  Then it is baths or showers for the kids which makes it 7pm.  7-8 is an hour of family games, either video gaming together or board games.  Kids are usually in bed at 8:30 and asleep by 9.

If I start a session at 8:15 say (as they are going to bed) and go for an hour, then that makes it 9:15 but I take about 90 min after a session to be able to get to be and sleep so that makes in 10:45, then up at 6 so best case is 7ish hours sleep.

Otherwise I go to bed when they do at 9pm, get my 8 hours, up at 5 to finish a session by 6 and get ready for work.

Both of these options leave no time for us as a couple or any other hobbies and that is only 5 hours training though the week.

Anyone else have a similar life circumstance, and if so how do you fit training in.  Note lunch training is not an option.

 

Only just read your post T, but not the whole thread yet!  This has been one of my big issues over the years, and why I was constantly tired and falling asleep regularly during my lunch breaks.  When I was doing average training, I was riding 2 to 3 mornings a week.  Running 3 to 4 arvos, and swimming one to two mornings.  Averaging 8 to 10 hours a week.  I luckily have no commute, but I still wanted to be home by 6.30 to make sure kids were getting ready.  And in the arvos I often had shopping to do, dinners to prepare etc.  We were rarely eating before 7.30.  if I then headed to bed at 8.30 then there was no life apart from training, house work, and work, and nothing for my wife.  And we live watching shows together so was regularly hitting bed at 11 or later each night.

Now I'm not training, I'm still doing a fair bit time wise.  I'm going to yoga classes at least 3 times a week, then also trying to walk the dog at least most days the week.  Then add in one easy ride and I'm still doing up to 10 hours a week.  And I'm back to taking asleep during lunch breaks again.

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15 hours ago, softy said:

This could be the case .... but, he's right.

If any of us have commitments that make sessions difficult in the afternoon, you have to get up earlier. There's something satisfying, knowing that you have run a half marathon before work, when other plonkers are dreading their session after work - or they don't do any exercise at all.

Any of us can answer in the same tone as AP. I gave you the answer (I am right you are wrong) but you didn't like it AM is right for some PM right for others, do what works. I used to be am before kids after kids did a lot more pm, big sessions still am though the odd mid afternoon epic trainer set or mid afternoon run when the sun is out in winter

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The thing, T, is it depends what you want out of it?  You can do triathlons on a meager amount of training, just don't expect results comparable to other people around you or here.  The fact you got out and did one poorly (compared to others) is a win.  I have had some truly awful performances and I've enjoyed them all.

An ex member here who did regular IM's but was around the 15+ hours once told me the weekend long ride and long  run were the only key sessions.  On the bike by 4 on the weekend for 6 hours, but the rest of the day was his.  Similar for the run, just maybe not so early.  During the week he did what he could without killing himself.  

Different people have different ideas of success.  Sometimes success is just getting to the start line, nothing more than that.  Everything after that is gravy!

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Reading all this, I'm glad I don't do the long stuff any more, it just doesn't sound like fun.

5yrs of the -7 frosty mornings on the bike really did my head in, even with multiple layers, ski gloves, balaclava etc.  Now I do all my weekday training at lunchtime, and don't start till around 9am on weekends.  Like Stikman said, the shorter stuff is enough.

The time with kids issue is interesting.  My parents spent very little time with us, esp. our father.  We learned to entertain ourselves, spent hours alone out roaming the bush fishing, shooting, riding bikes/motorbikes etc. and doing dangerous stoopid stuff that would have DOCs down on you like a ton of bricks these days.  Wouldn't trade it for anything, great life experience & self-reliance.  But in the country you can do all this as a kid.  Our girls had a very sheltered childhood by comparison, and I don't know how much 'quality time' they got with us (whatever that means - mostly we did sport with them or watched their sport & had some great holidays, but they weren't stuck to us like leeches).  Again, I think this gave them a good degree of self-sufficiency which is paying off in spades now.  We still seemed to fit our training in too, but I've never worked some of the crazy hours mentioned above, and could always get an hour done at lunch.

Armidale Temp.jpg

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9 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

I completely disagree. AP is right. Too many people give a good excuse as to why they can’t do something. How about trying to find a way to do something instead.

Now...... two things pretty obvious. Toolish needs to define quality time with wife and kids. Everyone’s definition is different of course....... but is what your doing really quality time. The other is..... 8 hours sleep. This is the reason why people take so long to get to sleep. They already have too much. 8 hours...... that for kids.

IronPo looks to get about 5-6 in order to get what he needs to get done. And I bet when his head hits the pillow he is out like a light.

Me.... I never sit still. I do shift work 12.5 hour shifts. When I do night shift I get the most of every day and I would at best get a maxim of 5 hours sleep. And I am out like a light as soon as my head hits the pillow. 

Example. Finish at 07:00am. At pool by 8am. Home by 9 or 9:30 depending on how far I swim. Breakfast. A ride or run. + chores. In bed by 12/12:30...... wake up 17:30. Shower and off to work.

When I do dayshifts the days are different but still get stuff in outside of 05:30 - 20:00.

I'm not sure you should have put this all in pink because you are taking the complete piss or that you are so self absorbed you don;t understand that people have others in their life that they care and want to actually spend time with.

When are you doing family stuff? Things with the family?

Or are you single or just in a loveless marriage? kids or not?  Because if you don;t have kids or a family, you can't even compare you life to someone with 2 kids under 5 etc...
 

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Some of us don't have the head hits the pillow out like a light thing either, and it's not kids causing it....sometimes its insomnia, for some (like the +1) restless legs syndrome, which seems to be a dark art about how you stop it! 

210_SLEEP.png

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O.K some of these guys who say you can get it done by just getting up earlier and get everything done. 

Lets look at some of the numbers 

up at 4am 

2hr session (after a piss & getting changed) 

6:15 off the bike. Drink, stretch 10min eat breakfast 

6:45 shower, shave get dressed hopefully you don't have to iron clothes 

7:00 drive to work (no time to put petrol in if required) 

7:30 start work (if your job allows this) 

Work all day - (fingers crossed you can get a 30min run in lunch. Not sure there is much IM value in running 30min but anyway) shower & get back to work. Eat lunch at your desk

Finish work at 4:30 (if you get out on time) drive home. 8hr day of work - 1hr lunch (30min run plus time to get changed & showered back to your desk) 

Home by 5:15 (traffic is normally worse in the afternoon) 

Start dinner, cook and eat, dishes finished up by 6:15pm 

homework with daughter 7:15pm 

Spend 45min with daughter cuddling on the couch 8pm

Make lunches for the next day 8:20pm 

Walk the dog 20min - 8:40pm 

Iron some clothes for work 9pm 

Sit down & talk adult stuff with wife (bills, work, etc) 9:30pm 

Pack your lunch time gear for the next day & get your training kit ready 

FK living life like that.  One little thing changes & there go's any hope of trying to sleep

The above scenario excludes 

* family events mid week 

* work dinners 

*having to drive to the pool

*assumes all sessions are done from home, no travel time

*no additional tasks like 

- dog to vet 

- school meeting

- kids sports practice 

- car needs to be serviced etc

- washing clothes, grocery shopping etc

The hardest part for me would be trying to stay focused and awake at work.

There is no way spending 45min a day is enough time with my daughter.

 

If these ppl who just get up earlier to get everything done could please forward me their CV.

 I'm sure we can get them a project management position that pays $200k a year. 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

FK living life like that.

This was my over-riding thought too, when I read a lot of the other posts.

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Just now, ComfortablyNumb said:

This was my over-riding thought too, when I read a lot of the other posts.

My over riding thought was.

- they are full of shit

-kids won’t know them

-there partners do everything 

-they have hired help

-working all day on the tools is only for 3hrs 

- they work from home 

- they will struggle to keep up this intensity year after year 

 

 

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9 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

The other is..... 8 hours sleep. This is the reason why people take so long to get to sleep. They already have too much. 8 hours...... that for kids.

Nup, I fall asleep as soon as I hit the pillow, even if the wife has the lights on reading, or watching TV or tapping on her laptop. 

And I can do 8-9 hours every night ,,,, and I need to.  

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5 hours ago, Rog said:

That’s nice you have no family and kids to worry about. No excuses for you indeed!

Lol. I am just a person who doesn’t ask for handouts or look for short cuts. I deal with what is thrown at me without any need for excuses.

Regarding family etc. My wife and kids miss out on nothing. I work around them. It’s a very simple thing to do. :)

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Well they clearly miss out a mention on your daily routine. 

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

When are you doing family stuff? Things with the family?

Or are you single or just in a loveless marriage? kids or not?  Because if you don;t have kids or a family, you can't even compare you life to someone with 2 kids under 5 etc...
 

My kids are now in Year 10 and 1st year of Uni. Do you think it is productive time for me to play games with them when then need to do assignments and home work. I help them when needed. Read all there assignments etc. As I said. Define productive time.

Also most afternoons I am home my son and I play tennis. Fortunately that is at home. We also run occasionally together play some golf. If I swim, my daughter and wife may go to the gym. My kids even do the B&B swim in summer on good days with me. We also eat together unless I am going for a run, then it’s mirowave for me and eat whilst watching TV.

My post above are simply an example that you “can” get things done if you plan it. It’s never a case of me first at all costs.

Also perhaps I should introduce some of you to a friend of mine..... 4 kids between 8 and 14. All play sport and one in rep teams. He can’t ride Saturdays and some sundays because of kids sport. He spends 2-3 nights a week in Melbourne due to work - he does 2 Ironmans a year........ he does around 12.5 hours.... but does what he needs to do to make that happen. He knows he can’t train as much as he wants and is fine with that.

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13 minutes ago, Rog said:

Well they clearly miss out a mention on your daily routine. 

You forget there are 24 hours in a day - 168 hours a week.

And I don’t do much in winter....... ski season! Kids love to ski.

Edited by IronmanFoz

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37 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

My over riding thought was.

- they are full of shit

-kids won’t know them

-there partners do everything 

-they have hired help

-working all day on the tools is only for 3hrs 

- they work from home 

- they will struggle to keep up this intensity year after year 

 

 

Some don’t have kids 

some have been divorced 

some prioritise and make it all work 

sone are selfish 

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Women have a habit of bashing other women for doing 'motherhood' or 'womanhood' differently to the way they might choose to do it. We are unfortunately our own worst enemies. Women as a group would do so much better if we supported each other rather than tearing each other down.

It appears much the same could be said for triathletes. 

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2 people who thought they made life family and work for pursuit of their semi elite tri goals

Lost jobs

lost wives 

and relationship with kids

you might think you have it worked out

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6 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

Some don’t have kids 

some have been divorced 

some prioritise and make it all work 

sone are selfish 

As a family we just decided my wife is going to reduce her hours at work. 

She is dropping from a 5 day week with a half day every second Saturday. Down to a three day week with no Saturday’s. 

We were struggling to fit everything in. For us it’s about quality of life over rushing around trying to get everything done. Then coming on a forum & telling everyone how hardcore & awesome u are because u get up at 3am & do hill repeats in the rain.

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22 minutes ago, Parkside said:

they may not enjoy cramming a family holiday around race week at Husky but prefer to be skiing with you or learning to surf. 

Yes, some people are fully entrench into the triathlon world. Every event etc. My family has lives too, hence the reason I only ever do 2 races per year.

1. Nepean - this was my first in 1989 and the race supports all local charities. Great philosophy, so for me I have two reasons to support it.

2. Ironman. I ask my kids if they want to come or not because it must be boring for them...... but they want to come. 

As a family we have no interest travelling to heaps of races. Though given I have joined a Tri Club for the first time since 1996..... I may include the Club Champs if I aren’t working that day.

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6 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

Hey AP. 

How about you break down your day for us? 

 

4.30: wake up

5am: pick up coffee at coffee shop on way to pool/track

5.10: 20 mins of core work with squad

5.30-7am: coach swim session calling people snowflakes and softies(5.30 - 8am) run or mt cootha repeats

7.15: swim own session

8.30: warm up Hummer

9.00 to 9.30: Hummer finally warm so drive to Chinese acupuncturist/herbalist

10.00-11.00: get poked, prodded and analysed by aforementioned health professional

11.15: Chemist Warehouse has a special on worming tablets so stop there briefly

12.15: Lunch - Fresh salmon, vegetables and rice depending on session intensity

13.00-17.30: On the tools

17:50: Log onto transitions to throw some shit at the excuse brigade

18.15: fire up the pizza oven

19.30: Dinner and glass of red

20.15: Bed

 

 

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17 hours ago, trinube said:

Ask yourself three questions:

What do I hope to achieve in triathlon?

What do I want from my family life?

Which of the above is most important to me?

Answer these and you'll have your answer.

In my highly uneducated and rookie opinion the first question in the above comment hits the nail on the head, what do you want out of triathlon.  Are you after Front of Pack results with World Championship qualifications or are you happy to compete and provide an example to your children of what you can achieve in life in the hope that they may follow in your footsteps to compete as well, which will lead to greater time spent together.

I have three children (5, 9 & 13) and fully understand my place in the triathlon world.  I have no aspirations for World Champ qualifications and am happy to be able to front up and give an honest effort and finish.

I have gone through the frustration in trying to prepare for my first 70.3 with all the grand plans of programmed training sessions only to be unable to do them due to life getting in the way.  Be it children not sleeping, working late, wife working late, family event commitments and the list goes on. 

The greatest piece of advice I feel I can give you (because it helped me) is to roll with life and accept your place on the triathlon totem pole.  If you hold aspirations to become front of pack your children will be out doing their own thing in a few years’ time and that is when you can ‘ramp’ up your training.

Now in regards to fitting things in now around life, try to use the commute to work if you can.  I have just started to ride to work, with it being just over 20km each way I am getting over 170km of riding (almost 3 ½hrs) in each week as one day I need to catch the train to be able to pick the girls up from dancing one night during the week. 

Short half hour runs in the evening once or twice a week with a long run (1hr at the moment) on a weekend.  This can either be while my middle one does a boxing class or Sunday morning before the wifey gets up.  This way we still have breakfast together as a family. 

Swimming is the issue at the moment but as my 70.3 goal isn’t until December I am just doing what I can and will see where life takes me in the months to come.

Just do what you can but most importantly accept what you can otherwise you will become bitter towards yourself and those around you.

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9 minutes ago, pieman said:

4.30: wake up

5am: pick up coffee at coffee shop on way to pool/track

5.10: 20 mins of core work with squad

5.30-7am: coach swim session calling people snowflakes and softies(5.30 - 8am) run or mt cootha repeats

7.15: swim own session

8.30: warm up Hummer

9.00 to 9.30: Hummer finally warm so drive to Chinese acupuncturist/herbalist

10.00-11.00: get poked, prodded and analysed by aforementioned health professional

11.15: Chemist Warehouse has a special on worming tablets so stop there briefly

12.15: Lunch - Fresh salmon, vegetables and rice depending on session intensity

13.00-17.30: On the tools

17:50: Log onto transitions to throw some shit at the excuse brigade

18.15: fire up the pizza oven

19.30: Dinner and glass of red

20.15: Bed

 

 

That can't be right.  He said he is on the tools from 8am until 5pm. 

Someone is lying here. 

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So what about from a coaches perspective? They say they factor in kids, work etc, but to what extent? They also say follow their program, don't deviate, don't chop and change etc That's all I did with my recent 70.3 program and coach, constantly moving sessions around in Training Peaks. 1 week I didn't train mon, tue, then crammed it all on wed, thur, fri...... not ideal, but sick kids meant no training. I could have dropped mon and tue sessions, but then you've gone from a 14 hour week to a 9 hour week.... hence the reason I probably won't go with a coach again, but will probably just get a cookie cutter program. Every week for me is different, school events, meetings presentations, sports events, sick kids, kids need dropping at school early, kids training, birthday parties etc etc And some of this stuff you get last minute notice about. 

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3 minutes ago, Cottoneyes said:

Has anyone ever seen a tombstone engraved with a PB finisher time yet?

AP is still alive. So just wait

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42 minutes ago, zed said:

So what about from a coaches perspective? They say they factor in kids, work etc, but to what extent? They also say follow their program, don't deviate, don't chop and change etc

If you've been honest with your coach (and yourself) and they give you a program that doesn't allow for this then they're not much of a coach.  Even if you haven't been honest then if they don't pick up on it and make adjustments in a few weeks then you're probably being ripped off, no matter how little you pay for it.

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I think it all comes down to this.  Not one of us has had exactly the same experience of anyone else on here!  Every single persons situation is different; some only slightly and some dramatically.  It is easy to give advice and say something that has worked for you.  It might work for some people and not others.  

All you can do is work out what is important to you (I mean in everything, not just tri) and find the balance that can give you the best of everything.  I've often read that triathlon can be a selfish sport.  But it's not the sport that's selfish.  It's the person, and only if what they are doing is negatively affecting their life and those around you.  If you can get in 20 hours of training a week and have a happy partner, kids, and life, then what is selfish about it?  Do what you can, be content, and don't covert what others can do.  No two families are exactly the same.  Be proud of what you can achieve based on your own circumstances.  Don't compare yourself to others, cause they don't matter.  Only you do, and the life you've made!

I think the yoga zen shit is getting to me!

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32 minutes ago, Cottoneyes said:

Has anyone ever seen a tombstone engraved with a PB finisher time yet?

I reckon a friend of mine will. Everything is related to his PB. Passwords etc etc..... he also expects his kids girlfriends and boyfriends to know his PB. Even my kids know his PB. It’s a bit of a ongoing gag. But why not. 

Better than a dull and boring tombstone.

Why not be different and have one that said the usual loving stuff then goes on and said.....also had a huge passion for Ironman and smashed out a PB of 09:59. 

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Would need an asterisk next to it if at somewhere like Busso or Texas.

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5 hours ago, Bored@work said:

My over riding thought was.

- they are full of shit

-kids won’t know them

-there partners do everything 

-they have hired help

-working all day on the tools is only for 3hrs 

- they work from home 

- they will struggle to keep up this intensity year after year 

 

 

Haven’t seen anyone owning up to satisfying any of those conditions?

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We pay for a cleaner & get most jobs around the house done.

My wife does almost everything 

im also full of shit 

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Might have been better to phrase it how many people are honestly expecting the Wanda CEO or senior management team to attend their funeral?

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Wow - this quickly turned for a thread asking for peoples perspectives and suggestions into people calling others out for being full of shit. 

Trannies in a snapshot.

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