Jump to content
Peter

Are you a failure if you don't do Kona?

Are you a failure if you don't do Kona?  

36 members have voted

This poll is closed to new votes
  1. 1. Are you a failure if you don't do Kona?

    • Yes
      6
    • No
      31


Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, Paul Every said:

You guys just aren't trying hard enough. No wonder you're not KQing.

I know Paul was taking the piss here but ....

Are you a failure if you don't do Kona during your triathlon career?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose it depends on if doing Kona is important to you.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doing Kona isn't exactly a cheap exercise.  If you don't have bucket loads of money its probably out of many's financial resources.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, goughy said:

I think you're a failure if you think someone is a failure if they fail to do Kona.  

I don't think anybody is a failure. We're all just trying to get along!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, monkie said:

I don't think anybody is a failure. We're all just trying to get along!

Have you read the politics thread??? :lol: 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You’re not a failure if you don’t get to Kona. But if you use lots of excuses as to why you didn’t, in order to justify you not getting there then that may be fail right there.

I find the beauty of Ironman is that once the race is done no one cares that you didn’t KQ or even go fast or what time you did. It’s a tough give nd you are part of it = respect. 

A lot of people won’t have the ideal race they expected........ let’s say you thought you were going to PB with a 09:55 and you had a shocker and did 12:35...... but one thing is assured... whilst you may feel down, no one else looks down at you. You’ll still get lots of well dones etc etc. It’s the smart ones that look at the bad race and learn and put it all in perspective then try gain next year.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of people come and go in this sport in a 2 to 5 year period because they define success as KQ or sub 10. You have to really enjoy doing the sbr, many don't have that lifelong passion and they identify as failures or make the excuses.

People with a genuine love of sbr tend to see things differently. I'd love to go to kona, I know it will take a bit more time than I have been giving it and being mentally stronger (that's not wanting it more, its not worrying about the other guy and letting the noise get to me)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d love to go to Kona one day, but if I don’t that’s ok and I will be happy to have just given it my best shot and will be happy to keep racing and just doing the sport. I love this sport, but for me just doing it, keeping fit, meeting similar minded people, travelling, that is what means the most to me. 

Ed: I think failure is such a strong word. Maybe if you put your all into Kona, that’s all you ever wanted, and you just couldn’t get there, maybe you’d put that label on yourself, but like mentioned above, others would still think you were amazing for the effort you out in. 

Edited by emski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, trinube said:

I suppose it depends on if doing Kona is important to you.

And even then, it would mean you failed at getting to Kona.

Not that you are a failure.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The obsession about Kona on this site is ridiculous. Not all, but so many peeps see it as the pinnacle or triathlon. It isn't for most...  I had zero interest in ironman until about 3 months ago, and it has now risen to zero point five as Mr BogFrog has signed up to Port...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand how people seem to think anyone can make it to a world championship race if they 'want it bad enough' 

That's either saying the bar is set too low for a world championship, or people's expectations are wrong in that 'anyone' can be  world class athlete if they want it bad enough. 

Hell I'd chop of my left and most probably my right testicle to play NBA, PGA or Premier League as world millions of others... But no matter what if you aren't born with that 'special talent' then it ain't going to be even close to being a possibility. 

Edited by more
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, more said:

 

Hell I'd chop of my left and most probably my right testicle to play NBA, PGA or Premier League as world millions of others... But no matter what if you aren't born with that 'special talent' then it ain't going to be even close to being a possibility. 

The difference is the NBA, PGA & Premier League etc don't have age groups divisions. It's simply the best players in the world get a jersey. Kona has charity spots, age groups (some of which are basically charity spots) legacy spots, sponsors spots and the ability to buy a spot. 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done triathlon since 2000 and my goal when I was 16 was to be a pro.
Self doubt and self sabotage has been a real problem for me and I gave up on my dream. 
Earlier this year I started thinking about my life and what I want to achieve.
This year my only goal is working towards becoming a professional athlete.
For me it is about me going on that journey everyday, learning more about myself and breaking those limiting beliefs I created.
If I reach my goals this year I will have the opportunity to go to Kona as an age grouper or to apply for a pro licence.
For me I want to race as a professional. Racing Kona isn't a focus so not racing Kona wouldn't be failure to me. 
Failure is what we choose to define it as. Failure for me would be giving up and not giving it my all. Even if I never achieve the qualification of that licence I can at least be proud knowing I gave it everything. 
Failure for one person might be neglecting the friends and family in pursuit of qualifying for Kona.
For someone else failure might be not crossing that line before the time cut off.
In the end we each define what success and failure is to us. The only persons opinion of my success and failure that matters is my own. Everyone else's opinion of my success and failures are none of my business. 

Edited by MackaEvo2
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, MackaEvo2 said:

I have done triathlon since 2000 and my goal when I was 16 was to be a pro.
Self doubt and self sabotage has been a real problem for me and I gave up on my dream. 
Earlier this year I started thinking about my life and what I want to achieve.
This year my only goal is working towards becoming a professional athlete.
For me it is about me going on that journey everyday, learning more about myself and breaking those limiting beliefs I created.
If I reach my goals this year I will have the opportunity to go to Kona as an age grouper or to apply for a pro licence.
For me I want to race as a professional. Racing Kona isn't a focus so not racing Kona wouldn't be failure to me. 
Failure is what we choose to define it as. Failure for me would be giving up and not giving it my all. Even if I never achieve the qualification of that licence I can at least be proud knowing I gave it everything. 
Failure for one person might be neglecting the friends and family in pursuit of qualifying for Kona.
For someone else failure might be not crossing that line before the time cut off.
In the end we each define what success and failure is to us. The only persons opinion of my success and failure that matters is my own. Everyone else's opinion of mu success and failures are none of my business. 

Post this late at night? Shouldn't you be in bed ready for 3am hill repeats in the rain?

Best of luck & chasing the dream to turn pro. How old are you now? and thanks for sharing a great post. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are John Landy, Ron Clarke and Sebastian Coe failures because they never raced an Olympic Marathon?  Neither Brownlee has raced Kona, nor did Emma Snowsill, Emma Carney or Emma Moffatt (among many others)

I have coached 2 different athletes to ITU, Age Group, Standard Distance, World Champion podiums. Neither of them have raced anything above Olympic Distance. Are they failures?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally couldn't give two shits about Kona

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been doing triathlons etc for close to 30yrs and have zero interest in going to Kona. It's just not on my radar nor has it ever been. I acknowledge and fully support the effort and dedication that someone puts in to achieve their goal of going to Kona, but it's their goal, not mine.

It's just not relevant to  measure oneself against someone else's personal goals or what they consider to be important.

Edited by bRace
Wording
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve seen plenty of people succeed in going to Kona but in the process make a good job of failing at “life”.

this is where I think the legacy spots are a good idea, it lets those who aren’t prepared to sacrifice everything for Kona still get there. 

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the conclusion of nearly everyone is that Kona does not measure your success or failure in the sport?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the only way not going to kona is a 'failure' is if you wanted to go, tried to go and didn't get there... but even with this, there are so many intangibles around strength of field, mechanicals etc etc beyond your control...

 

Personally, no, Kona isn't on my radar at all, I'd struggle with the effort and $$$ required to get there and go well. So much so that I stumbled in to a Kona spot at one of the Chinese 70.3's last year but turned it down as I really wanted to go to Nice (and had planned around this), and incoming first child meant that I knew an Ironman was never going to work... you do get some funny looks for declining a Kona spot though! 

I doubt I'll ever get myself near enough to the pointy end of a race again to get a Kona spot, but am totally fine with that, have absolutely no regrets... racing in Nice (all being well) and taking the bub to meet its grandparents in Europe for the first time will be reward and satisfaction enough for me!!!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Bored@work said:

Post this late at night? Shouldn't you be in bed ready for 3am hill repeats in the rain?

Best of luck & chasing the dream to turn pro. How old are you now? and thanks for sharing a great post. 

Yeah much later than I should. Sleep is important and certainly something I need to work on.
I'm currently 33years young. Thanks for the support 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THERE IS NO SUCH THING CALLED FAILURE.......... IT’S CALLED FEEDBACK!

 

What you do with that feedback is up to you!

Edited by IronmanFoz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Not unless they are paying airfares, accommodation and race entry.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Nope - unlike what some believe, Kona is not the only thing in life.

In fact I wonder how many people will look back on the time they spent trying to get there and will regret not spending their time doing something else. I doubt anyone on their death bed will be saying "gee I wish I'd spent more time training for IM".

Edited by trinube

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Nope

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BarryBevan said:

Where is the silent majority 

Training for Kona 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

If they did that then sure why not. If they don’t then I’m not a failure. 

I know I only need to do another 5 IM branded races and I will have qualified. That’s only 84hr and 55min of exercise to get the invite. Play the system. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rory-dognz said:

If they did that then sure why not. If they don’t then I’m not a failure. 

I know I only need to do another 5 IM branded races and I will have qualified. That’s only 84hr and 55min of exercise to get the invite. Play the system. 

Or $20k then the cost of Kona 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, trinube said:

Nope - unlike what some believe, Kona is not the only thing in life.

In fact I wonder how many people will look back on the time they spent trying to get there and will regret not spending their time doing something else. I doubt anyone on their death bed will be saying "gee I wish I'd spent more time training for IM".

Nope. The time I spent trying to get there, I still look back at as the best time of my life (outside playing with the kids). I was lucky enough to do it in my mid 20's, training with some of the best mates I ever had. No matter what anyone on here says, what I did to qualify for that race gave this young bloke with no self-confidence, a moment in his life that he can look back on and draw confidence from when he starts having doubts about self-worth. 

So no, you are not a failure if you can't KQ, but, it can be a defining moment in your life, and one that you don't regret.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you a failure if you haven't done Kona, 100% if you want to do Kona and haven't as you can just buy your way in every year.  Lol.  Of course not.

Are you a failure if you back doored through the lottery or legacy, nah, once you just rocked up and did it, then you could write a letter before any of the profit motive arrived so a lottery or legacy isn't much different to how it was originally.  

Are you a failure if you qualified, nah, you put the time in, good luck to you.

Are you successful as a human if you've done Kona.... now there's a question that has two answers, some are very, some not.   Lol.

 

 

 

Edited by Oompa Loompa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are u a failure if you draft ya way to Kona, claim to be a world champion in the military division & get coached by a Dr with direct link to doping?

asking for a friend 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

Are u a failure if you draft ya way to Kona, claim to be a world champion in the military division & get coached by a Dr with direct link to doping?

asking for a friend 

No. You are a master of your domain.  lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Nope. It just doesn't interest me at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

Maybe 10 Years ago when my idea was based on the glorified portrayal. 

But now, the reality of Kona doesn't excite me. So id say no. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Peter said:

So all those that said kona isnt on the radar i do wonder if ironman called you and said, you can do kona this October if you want, how many would go, “sure”. 

I didnt? I sure had to think for a long long time about it though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kona is another race on the calendar in a nice location. The swim is amazing, 90% off the bike and run are on batshit boring roads. I got sick of driving the highway from Waikola into Kona. 90km for the 70.3 was enough, stuff running 42km.  The 70.3 half marathon was probably the nicest 21km I have ever run/walked. 

 

On 25/05/2019 at 8:16 AM, roxii said:

I’ve seen plenty of people succeed in going to Kona but in the process make a good job of failing at “life”.

 

Yeah but then you can post with a condescending tone towards others, quote the number of times you have been, use it as a defence every time someone disagrees with you and put a stupid emoji on the end of every sentence. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

 

Yeah but then you can post with a condescending tone towards others, quote the number of times you have been, use it as a defence every time someone disagrees with you and put a stupid emoji on the end of every sentence. 

Would make a nice signature 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎25‎/‎05‎/‎2019 at 7:22 AM, -H- said:

I personally couldn't give two shits about Kona

I was exactly the same, but then I went anyway.  I just happened to have a good day at Cairns IM back in 2012 where I came 3rd in the 45-49 Age Group in 9:52.  Due to some medical issues at the time I wasn't sure if I'd even be allowed to train and race again but my wife (who doesn't really have any interest in the sport at all) made one of the best calls of her life and talked me into accepting my spot.  Her argument was that she didn't want to to listen to me complain later about how I didn't take the opportunity.  I've always said that the pain of failure is much less than the pain of regret and she wasn't going to let me forget it.

Kona is a very different event.  The hype and the lead up all adds to making this it an incredible event.  There is an amazing volunteer base that does a great job and the course is very unique.  The swim course is beautiful and is very challenging for us weaker swimmers.  The ride, and in particular the wind on the ride, makes this leg more difficult than most, and the sheer heat on the run makes it an event that is difficult to race well.  The course itself is very fitting of a World Championship in one of the most difficult sports in the world.  If competing at a World Championship of this type floats your boat then why shouldn't you give it a go.  But if you never get the chance, through either a lack of ability or circumstance, then there is no way that this makes you a failure.

I understand only too well that it is having a very understanding wife and family, some great friends who are super encouraging, and a whole range of other circumstances such as my work situation and adequate finances that have allowed me to tick this triathlon box.  It wasn't something that I was overly worried about doing in the first place, but it is certainly one of my favourite triathlon experiences.  It's a total 'wankfest' in that it attracts some very self absorbed people, but it's still a great event in it's own way.

The other great thing about Kona is the Legacy system of giving people the opportunity to race Kona.  I got to meet and race alongside some people that I have an amazing admiration.  These people were more deserving of being there than myself, but it was just luck and circumstance that had me there as qualifier, and them their as a result of their Legacy spot.

Are you a failure if you've never done Kona...?   No way, you've just had other priorities and circumstances that were more important.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If ScoMo were my coach he would say "How good is Kona!"

But he ain't and I will never know how good Kona is even though I KQ''d at my first IM branded event. Being self coached, my personal goal was to finish in a respectable time for my own gratification. So I proved to myself that i  could tick that box without any outside help using my own program and training by myself. If you can do that it gives you all the self-confidence you will ever need.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy to say it, just personal opinion and has no bearing on others personal opinion as I can completely understand how everyone has arrived at theirs but for me,

kona was/is the holy grail.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Leon said:

kona was/is the holy grail.

That's a fair call...  if Kona isn't the Holy Grail of Triathlon what is???

It's definitely not the Olympics and even the World Champs is way off the atmosphere of Kona.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Go Easy said:

That's a fair call...  if Kona isn't the Holy Grail of Triathlon what is???

The holy grail is enjoyment - whatever that may come from or be.

For me at least, that is my first priority or measurement of success in the sport.

Edited by Slunnie
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Slunnie said:

The holy grail is enjoyment - whatever that may come from or be.

For me at least, that is my first priority or measurement of success in the sport.

What’s your last priority?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Go Easy said:

.  It's a total 'wankfest' in that it attracts some very self absorbed people, but it's still a great event in it's own way.

The other great thing about Kona is the Legacy system of giving people the opportunity to race Kona.

Are you a failure if you've never done Kona...?   No way, you've just had other priorities and circumstances that were more important.

 

Thanks for posting. Good on your wife for pushing you to take your spot. 

Now there has been a couple of Pro Kona posts I’m waiting for the usual emoji posts to start 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Peter said:

What’s your last priority?

My coach would probably say training for me. 😂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Slunnie said:

The holy grail is enjoyment..

Agree totally, the ultimate goal for all of us should be enjoyment.

But if you had to name one 'event' that for most people would be described as the 'Holy Grail of Triathlon' what would it be?

I've got a lot of friends who do not have a great interest in Triathlon yet they all seem to have a knowledge of the race in Kona.  It's probably not the best event in the world, but it would have to be the best known event.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

Now there has been a couple of Pro Kona posts I’m waiting for the usual emoji posts to start 

What's the relationship between Pro Kona posts and Emoji posts? :huh:

(Edited to add a 'huh' emoji as I really don't understand that comment!)

Edited by Go Easy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...