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trilobite

The 1% stuff

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When people talk / write about break-through performances (eg dropping x:xx time for an IM finish), they often refer to the 1% things they did in between.

Putting to the side a debate on whether the underlying commitment the 1% things represent might have more to do with the improvement than the 1% things themselves, are there any you want to share?

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Stretch daily, eat right, get enough sleep and have a massage at least once a month. Having that foundation as habit in your life will enable you to undertake whatever training program you desire, then compete in whatever event you choose..

too often those four elements are seen as 1% ers and less important than training and having the latest gear and gizmos. 

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The right drugs supplements.

 

I heard one of the professional cycling teams go on about the 1%.

Edited by Ex-Hasbeen

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Further to above, sleep is the number 1 performance enhancer (legal and illegal). If we could all sleep 10-12hr a night, what a difference it would make! 

I have been making a conscious effort to get 8+ as much as possible and try to avoid anything under 7hr where I can. 

 

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Most/many people who worry about the 1%'ers would be better off spending their time and energy doing the other 99% a bit better. This includes sleep.

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For me to improve i see it like this 

13% eat better

11% sleep longer

17% train more consistently 

8% lose 8kg

19% be more positive about training

 

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14 minutes ago, Peter said:

For me to improve i see it like this 

13% eat better

11% sleep longer

17% train more consistently 

8% lose 8kg

19% be more positive about training

 

That's 68%. Add the 80% mental to that & it's 148%. You need to fix your maths.

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1 hour ago, CEM said:

Most/many people who worry about the 1%'ers would be better off spending their time and energy doing the other 99% a bit better. This includes sleep.

This.

Forget the 1% ers. Showing up for training then following through with racing as if your life depended on it will guarantee the breakthrough you are searching for.

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4 hours ago, Peter said:

For me to improve i see it like this 

13% eat better

11% sleep longer

17% train more consistently 

8% lose 8kg

19% be more positive about training

 

You may want to increase your focus on that 8KG (8%)

8kg over weight means..... on a per metre basis you have just carried 336 tonne around the marathon course (420 tonne if you are 10kg over weight)

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10 hours ago, Peter said:

For me to improve i see it like this 

13% eat better

11% sleep longer

17% train more consistently 

18% lose 18kg

19% be more positive about training

 

 

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Ignore my family and job so I can train and recover more consistently.

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19 minutes ago, Naut said:

Ignore my family and job so I can train and recover more consistently.

You need to want it bad enough ;)

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I don't know what percentage it is - but lose the excuses is a huge opportunity 

But making excuses is such an ingrained habit that it's like quitting smoking - the excuse makers always find something outside of themselves as the reason their performances are shit - you only have to read this forum for a few weeks to identify them 😏 - go ahead and attack me -- I'm only the messenger

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2 hours ago, Naut said:

Ignore my family and job so I can train and recover more consistently.

And work harder get better job to retire

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Sleep, water & happines/relaxed are the keys for me.

My best race was on a 10 week program. I wasn't my fittest or lightest. I spent a few days in Vegas before heading to the race location. I then chilled at my mates place. We drank coffee, went to kids sports, watched movies etc. I finished with a 4:02 marathon and my fastest race. Thought I had finally cracked the code to Ironman racing & a sub 11hr time was on the cards.

Rocked up to Chattanooga in ok form & thought I was on track to go close to 11hrs. Staying in Nashville before the race I had a meth head break into my room at 3am. Freaked the shit out me & I couldn't sleep for the next three days. Had a shocking race.

12 week build for Ironman Maryland. Lightest and fittest I had everbeen and on track for a massive PB. I arrived at the race jetlagged and stressed . Ended up having a shocking swim, a solid bike and a crap run. Finished with a 12:30ish time

I'm dissapointed I never got a sub11 finish but I'm happy with everything I have achieved. 20 x ironman finishes, made friends & travelled a lot.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Naut said:

Ignore my family and job so I can train and recover more consistently.

 

E197EAE2-CCE7-4A42-9955-93F02F041A28.jpeg

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21 hours ago, lachie94 said:

Further to above, sleep is the number 1 performance enhancer (legal and illegal). If we could all sleep 10-12hr a night, what a difference it would make! 

I have been making a conscious effort to get 8+ as much as possible and try to avoid anything under 7hr where I can. 

 

So with the newborn I'm screwed. I suspected as much but it's good to have it confirmed.

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14 minutes ago, dazaau said:

So with the newborn I'm screwed. I suspected as much but it's good to have it confirmed.

Unless you are blessed with an infant who begins sleeping through the night early and / or have a very accommodating spouse, the idea of getting 6 hours straight will begin to look tantalising.

I suspect there are some athletes that may not realise how much of a “competitive advantage” the preparedness of their spouse (and perhaps extended family) to look after their little person(s) is...

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6 hours ago, Bored@work said:

I'm dissapointed I never got a sub11 finish but I'm happy with everything I have achieved. 20 x ironman finishes, made friends & travelled a lot.

Never say never. Come out of retirement and give Busso a shot. You owe yourself a shot at the prize.

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2 hours ago, dazaau said:

So with the newborn I'm screwed. I suspected as much but it's good to have it confirmed.

My advice is don't let a new born child be your excuse. Your the adult - don't let the new born dictate your life/lifestyle.

And that's goes for everything including going out/parties/dinner and training/racing. You just need to adapt your training.

Adapt, Overcome, Improvise!

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5 minutes ago, IronmanFoz said:

My advice is don't let a new born child be your excuse. Your the adult - don't let the new born dictate your life/lifestyle.

I didn't sleep for more than 20 minutes at a time for the first 18 months of my life apparently. I think my folks would have struggled to do anything but survive. Like they say, I owe them one when it comes to looking after them!

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33 minutes ago, IronmanFoz said:

Never say never. Come out of retirement and give Busso a shot. You owe yourself a shot at the prize.

 

6 hours ago, Bored@work said:

Sleep, water & happines/relaxed are the keys for me.

My best race was on a 10 week program. I wasn't my fittest or lightest. I spent a few days in Vegas before heading to the race location. I then chilled at my mates place. We drank coffee, went to kids sports, watched movies etc. I finished with a 4:02 marathon and my fastest race. Thought I had finally cracked the code to Ironman racing & a sub 11hr time was on the cards.

Rocked up to Chattanooga in ok form & thought I was on track to go close to 11hrs. Staying in Nashville before the race I had a meth head break into my room at 3am. Freaked the shit out me & I couldn't sleep for the next three days. Had a shocking race.

12 week build for Ironman Maryland. Lightest and fittest I had everbeen and on track for a massive PB. I arrived at the race jetlagged and stressed . Ended up having a shocking swim, a solid bike and a crap run. Finished with a 12:30ish time

I'm dissapointed I never got a sub11 finish but I'm happy with everything I have achieved. 20 x ironman finishes, made friends & travelled a lot.

 

 

Busso 2019 I'm thinking I've got a bit more to give and you can get a 530 bike on 160 watts

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36 minutes ago, IronmanFoz said:

My advice is don't let a new born child be your excuse. Your the adult - don't let the new born dictate your life/lifestyle.

And that's goes for everything including going out/parties/dinner and training/racing. You just need to adapt your training.

Adapt, Overcome, Improvise!

Hahahahaha parenting gold straight from the Ironman is life manual...

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13 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

 

Busso 2019 I'm thinking I've got a bit more to give and you can get a 530 bike on 160 watts

Does Busso have a bakery?

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7 hours ago, Bored@work said:

Sleep, water & happines/relaxed are the keys for me.

Especially important for improving your swimming.

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1 hour ago, IronmanFoz said:

My advice is don't let a new born child be your excuse. Your the adult - don't let the new born dictate your life/lifestyle.

And that's goes for everything including going out/parties/dinner and training/racing. You just need to adapt your training.

Adapt, Overcome, Improvise!

I nominate you to advocate on behalf of some (former?) athletes, whose spouse (and often family) think that carving out some time (let’s say just 10 hours per week) to pursue some triathlons is selfish when there’s an infant in the house.

I assume you are, of course, familiar with the fact that equating 10 hours of triathlon training with 10 hours of a more traditional use of that time (eg longer work hours or watching footy) will not be accepted as an appropriate comparison?

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11 hours ago, trilobite said:

Unless you are blessed with an infant who begins sleeping through the night early and / or have a very accommodating spouse, the idea of getting 6 hours straight will begin to look tantalising.

I suspect there are some athletes that may not realise how much of a “competitive advantage” the preparedness of their spouse (and perhaps extended family) to look after their little person(s) is...

You learn ways to get around it with 1, get a good jogging pram for the runs when they are old enough, windtrainer for the bike when the kid is asleep and the partner is out.  Both get you time for training and time for the partner to get out which is win/win.  The swims you have to get in where you can

1 is easy, 3 becomes a real challenge

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8 hours ago, pieman said:

Hahahahaha parenting gold straight from the Ironman is life manual...

The thing is, most people don't think outside the box. Rather than catch a train or drive home....run instead......

Kids don't stay awake all the time.

You learn pretty quickly that a Saturday ride isn't just a stroll.... it becomes a weekly time trial....always riding against the clock. My fastest Forster bike was 05:15......on one ride per week.

Some kids sleep well in a running pram.

PS: I have seen some people almost drop out of society because a couple of kids come along. Lean to make them work around you not the other way around.

DONT GET PUSHED AROUND BY AN INFANT - YOU BE THE BULLY NOT THEM :)

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1 hour ago, IronmanFoz said:

The thing is, most people don't think outside the box. Rather than catch a train or drive home....run instead......

Kids don't stay awake all the time.

You learn pretty quickly that a Saturday ride isn't just a stroll.... it becomes a weekly time trial....always riding against the clock. My fastest Forster bike was 05:15......on one ride per week.

Some kids sleep well in a running pram.

PS: I have seen some people almost drop out of society because a couple of kids come along. Lean to make them work around you not the other way around.

DONT GET PUSHED AROUND BY AN INFANT - YOU BE THE BULLY NOT THEM :)

You should write a book...

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To stay in this sport long term and reap the many benefits that come from it - you really have to use dietary supplements as nutritional insurance - there are always some "experts" on here who'll dispute their value

They are supplements - an addition to a great diet - not a replacement for a great diet 

Start simple - fish oil capsules - extra vit C - and a multi vitamin - this covers most things that may run short in a life with 10-15hrs of more work than your neighbours may be doing

Recovery feeding right after workouts can help you avoid injuries - as well as getting stronger and faster - you have to give your body the fuel to repair - you're better to pay more attention to recovery than to speed work - you'll be around longer in this sport 😎

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5 hours ago, Cottoneyes said:

The swims you have to get in where you can

Swim bands in the garage.

Even when the kids get older, you can work with them. You run while they ride their bike with you (trail runs are excellent for this). I also used to take my wind trainer to watch my son play cricket - just had to find a tree with shade (and not worry about the funny looks I used to get). 

 

FM

Edited by Flanman
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18 hours ago, trilobite said:

I nominate you to advocate on behalf of some (former?) athletes, whose spouse (and often family) think that carving out some time (let’s say just 10 hours per week) to pursue some triathlons is selfish when there’s an infant in the house.

I assume you are, of course, familiar with the fact that equating 10 hours of triathlon training with 10 hours of a more traditional use of that time (eg longer work hours or watching footy) will not be accepted as an appropriate comparison?

Smart use of time to get me to the start line sure beats perceived smart use of time sitting in a pub after work having a few drinks when one has already used the can’t train excuse on a new born. If you can’t train you can’t do a lot of shit so.... no excuses.

Its like the climate change disciples...... they want to save the world but still want to drive a car, go on a cruise or fly in a plain and then want to heat there house in winter and cool it in summer. Excuses are many.

And not directed at you Trilobite. :)

 

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5 hours ago, Flanman said:

I also used to take my wind trainer to watch my son play cricket - just had to find a tree with shade (and not worry about the funny looks I used to get). 

FM

Absolute GOLD!!!!!!

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6 hours ago, Flanman said:

I also used to take my wind trainer to watch my son play cricket - just had to find a tree with shade (and not worry about the funny looks I used to get). 

 

FM

My son and I drew the line at this,

me running/riding to cricket or running laps of the park while he was in the field, wearing Vibrum 5 fingers. But the wind trainer was a step to far.  😃

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19 hours ago, trilobite said:

I nominate you to advocate on behalf of some (former?) athletes, whose spouse (and often family) think that carving out some time (let’s say just 10 hours per week) to pursue some triathlons is selfish when there’s an infant in the house.

I assume you are, of course, familiar with the fact that equating 10 hours of triathlon training with 10 hours of a more traditional use of that time (eg longer work hours or watching footy) will not be accepted as an appropriate comparison?

 

55 minutes ago, IronmanFoz said:

Smart use of time to get me to the start line sure beats perceived smart use of time sitting in a pub after work having a few drinks when one has already used the can’t train excuse on a new born. If you can’t train you can’t do a lot of shit so.... no excuses.

Set up with your man cave so you can work from home on your lap top while you're on the trainer, with the footy the big screen and a couple of mates next to you in lounge chairs to pass you beers, while you knock out a quality session with a few watts redirected to jiggling the baby rocker to keep the infant placated and amused while you're developing that special father-child relationship.

If you sinking enough beers and generating enough watts through the rocker, there's a good chance you may share the unique bonding experience of throwing up together. All four of you.

You guys just aren't trying hard enough. No wonder you're not KQing.

 

Edited by Paul Every
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On 24/05/2019 at 6:02 PM, Paul Every said:

You guys just aren't trying hard enough. No wonder you're not KQing.

 

They just don't want it bad enough 🤨

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