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PhiltriDAD

Triathlon bike upgrades on a budget

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Hello, 

I am relatively new to the triathlon scene and quickly become obsessed. My new goal is to train for the Busselton 70.3 Ironman and looking for some advice on some upgrades. 

I bought an entry level road bike, which I am actually quite comfortable on, however want to start to make some upgrade to give the bike a better edge. 

Does anyone have some advice on wheel and crank/cassette upgrades on a budget? I have spent enough already this year on my new passion and with an overseas holiday coming up, bike upgrades aren't completely in the budget :) 

 

If anyone has some brands, models or suggestions that would be great

 

Regards, 

 

Phil

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If you don't already have clip on aero bars then that is the only cost effective upgrade.

The rest is not value for money. I have my fastest IM bike split on a well fitted road bike with clip ons, than the following 7 on a tri bike, because i did more training in for the first one on a road bike.

A option if possible is join a club and you may be able to borrow some gear that will help go faster

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1 hour ago, PhiltriDAD said:

Hello, 

I am relatively new to the triathlon scene and quickly become obsessed. My new goal is to train for the Busselton 70.3 Ironman and looking for some advice on some upgrades. 

I bought an entry level road bike, which I am actually quite comfortable on, however want to start to make some upgrade to give the bike a better edge. 

Does anyone have some advice on wheel and crank/cassette upgrades on a budget? I have spent enough already this year on my new passion and with an overseas holiday coming up, bike upgrades aren't completely in the budget :)

 

If anyone has some brands, models or suggestions that would be great

 

Regards, 

 

Phil

Have a look on gumtree, and the various FB marketplace groups, there are around 4/5 in Perth e.g Perth bicycle market, Perth triathlon buy and sell etc Don't spend a fortune trying to convert a roadie into a TT bike, because most people eventually end up buying a TT bike anyway. I would leave the cassette and crank unless it;'s really old and broken. What cassette is on there at the moment, 10 speed, 11 - 23 is fine. Weight difference between 105 and Ultegra is negligible, upgrading would be a waste of money. 

- get some deeper dish rims, 50mm+, 2nd hand. Have a look at tubulars, much cheaper than clinchers. 

- get some aero bars, you could always opt for the small ITU ones

- decent tyres

- to save money do your bike fit yourself using youtube or get a mate to help 

 

You can pick up decent Cervelo P2s for under $1k, this one is $600, so really you don't want to whack too much $$ on an entry level roadie.

https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/mitcham/men-s-bicycles/cervelo-p2/1214337585

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, zed said:

Have a look on gumtree, and the various FB marketplace groups, there are around 4/5 in Perth e.g Perth bicycle market, Perth triathlon buy and sell etc Don't spend a fortune trying to convert a roadie into a TT bike, because most people eventually end up buying a TT bike anyway. I would leave the cassette and crank unless it;'s really old and broken. What cassette is on there at the moment, 10 speed, 11 - 23 is fine. Weight difference between 105 and Ultegra is negligible, upgrading would be a waste of money. 

- get some deeper dish rims, 50mm+, 2nd hand. Have a look at tubulars, much cheaper than clinchers. 

- get some aero bars, you could always opt for the small ITU ones

- decent tyres

- to save money do your bike fit yourself using youtube or get a mate to help 

 

You can pick up decent Cervelo P2s for under $1k, this one is $600, so really you don't want to whack too much $$ on an entry level roadie.

https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/mitcham/men-s-bicycles/cervelo-p2/1214337585

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the info!

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2 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

If you don't already have clip on aero bars then that is the only cost effective upgrade.

The rest is not value for money. I have my fastest IM bike split on a well fitted road bike with clip ons, than the following 7 on a tri bike, because i did more training in for the first one on a road bike.

A option if possible is join a club and you may be able to borrow some gear that will help go faster

Good info, thanks alot

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I have that particular P2. My pb on two courses is with that bike (15 x long course races). 

FM

Edited by Flanman
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I have a srm powermeter or two for sale

surely you need power so you can post on strava 🤔

(disclaimer I don’t do strava) 

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The above is all good stuff, I'm about to post in the Pay it Forward Thread for a free cadence meter if you can't yet afford a power meter but want something to start collecting more metrics (assuming you know what to do with those metrics).

 

All that aside I just wanted say welcome to Transitions. We hope you stick around :D

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Busso is flat, so weight doesn't make much if any difference. This also means there should be no reason to bother with upgrading cranks and cassette. for some cheap upgrades, make sure you have good tyres (a low CRR, without too much of a loss of puncture protection) - For reference, the rule of thumb is that the speed difference (due to CRR - rolling resistance) between a Conti GP4kS2II and a Conti Gatorskin is more than the time it would take to change a tyre from a flat on the faster tyre. the new GP5k apparently is a tiny bit faster, and a little more puncture resistant (and the 4k's were not too bad anyway, I average around 1 flat every 3-4thousand km on them, on not very good roads). And these are not as fast as other models on the market.

The other cheap upgrade (technically even cheaper than tyres) is to replace your tubes with latex tubes, instead of the standard butyl. This again will drop the CRR. And they feel a little better imo.

 

From an aero perspective, the least aero thing on the bike is the rider - get the rider into a better position is the cheapest option, a few tweaks to your position with the addition of aerobars will make a difference. after that, next cheapest is an aero helmet. then front wheel.

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TBH I'd put money into a good biek fit before buying any upgrades/TT bike etc. Ask them to set you up on aerobars on your road bike. Being comfortable over that long a distance is probably #1 consideration. No point in having new flashy bits on your bike if you cannot stay aero. 

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On 03/04/2019 at 8:33 AM, Cape_Horn said:

Busso is flat, so weight doesn't make much if any difference. This also means there should be no reason to bother with upgrading cranks and cassette. for some cheap upgrades, make sure you have good tyres (a low CRR, without too much of a loss of puncture protection) - For reference, the rule of thumb is that the speed difference (due to CRR - rolling resistance) between a Conti GP4kS2II and a Conti Gatorskin is more than the time it would take to change a tyre from a flat on the faster tyre. the new GP5k apparently is a tiny bit faster, and a little more puncture resistant (and the 4k's were not too bad anyway, I average around 1 flat every 3-4thousand km on them, on not very good roads). And these are not as fast as other models on the market.

Mate with all love and respect, after LCW I ain't gonna listen to your puncture advice 😉

Edited by monkie

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2 hours ago, monkie said:

Mate with all love and respect, after LCW I ain't gonna listen to your puncture advice 😉

bwahaha

Can I claim that tyre was a Schwalbe One? (well, I think it was)  (And I want to claim dispensation for that - same piece of wire will ruin your whole weekend)

 

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2 hours ago, monkie said:

Mate with all love and respect, after LCW I ain't gonna listen to your puncture advice 😉

The are faster the right way around!!☹️

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18 minutes ago, rory-dognz said:

The are faster the right way around!!☹️

HA! Touche.

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10 hours ago, dazmuzza said:

TBH I'd put money into a good biek fit before buying any upgrades/TT bike etc. Ask them to set you up on aerobars on your road bike. Being comfortable over that long a distance is probably #1 consideration. No point in having new flashy bits on your bike if you cannot stay aero. 

Yep, since your body accounts for most of the drag, get yourself aero, make sure you can hold that position for the duration, and don't worry about the frame details so much.

Be aware though that unless you change more than just the aero bars, you'll likely end up with a crappy fit.

But a good aero-bar-on-road-bike setup is possible.  It involves rotating your whole position forwards (around the bottom bracket axis) from a typical road position, not just lowering your torso, because that will just fold you up and make you less powerful and efficient.

So, you'll likely need to move your saddle forwards and up (maybe a zero offset seatpost or even forwards offset), and move your bars forwards and down (ie a very aggressive stem angle).

Rotating forwards on a regular saddle is also bad for Little Phil, so you probably want a different saddle, like an ISM or similar tri saddle.

An aero helmet should be good value, particularly used.  Giro Advantage 2 apparently tests well for most people.

As mentioned the groupset on the bike won't make you any faster unless something is faulty.

Wheels - a rear disc cover is probably the best bang for bucks, followed by the deepest widest front wheel you can afford.  Wrapped in low roling resistance tyres and latex tubes.

Read me: http://www.bikeroar.com/tips/5-best-mods-to-turn-your-road-bike-into-a-tt-machine

Edited by MAK

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8 hours ago, dazmuzza said:

Maybe.  But for aero bar position you probably want a different saddle anyway, so to me it made sense just to have two posts and swap them over. That would be my main negative of the Redshift Quagmire (giggity).

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18 hours ago, MAK said:

Maybe.  But for aero bar position you probably want a different saddle anyway, so to me it made sense just to have two posts and swap them over. That would be my main negative of the Redshift Quagmire (giggity).

:) Yes and know

 

I use a specialised power saddle on my roadie which works for both normal and TT riding. 

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