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FatPom

Getting older and staying fit

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I'm 54 in a couple weeks. Not old compared to some but old enough that I'm feeling it, plus my body has been through more than its fair share of incidents, that make it feel much older. I saw this thread on ST and could identify with a lot of it.

https://forum.slowtwitch.com/forum/Slowtwitch_Forums_C1/Triathlon_Forum_F1/Triathlon_and_Aging%3A_making_the_transition_from_goal_to_process_P6893928/

I'm staying in relative good shape with the hand I've been dealt. Hitting some good numbers running (for me) and had a good couple of years TTing but whilst training is going ok this year, I really am struggling to hit that top layer of power on the bike like I was last year. Strange thing is, I'm not sure I want to even chase it any more. I'm in a transition phase with the things I'm doing, gradually gravitating to an off road lifestyle (trail running/ mtb) although will always enjoy road riding.  This was planned and a promise I made to myself after IM Wales last year.

However, between work stress, looking after Flipper and dealing with the new house, the hunger to really really dig deep is fading a bit.  I love training, I love racing, love seeing where I came but I don't love the pressure of constantly smashing myself to try and maintain last year's FTP or whatever.  I don't have many plans for the TT bike this year but I know if I sell it, I won't get another and will just do whatever I need to on the roadie.  Maybe that matters, maybe it doesn't?

I'll always enter stuff, a lifestyle of training with no events has zero appeal to me. Just feel like it's time to stop trying to do everything at full tilt, all the time. I wonder if anyone feels the same?

 

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Do what you enjoy, lives change and people evolve. What you may have loved 10 years ago may no longer interest you, what may have been a priority 10 years ago may now be insignificant. 

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One of the guys that works with me went to his doctor a few years ago when he hurt his shoulder. He was late 40's. He'd done some damage to his collarbone playing touch football. His doctor asked him what exercise he did, and he told him soccer, touch, swimming, running, and a bit of volleyball.

The doctor told him he could operate, but the problem may not be totally gone, or he could just "act his age"

I'd be looking for a new doctor.

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Strength training as you get older is a big key to holding back the ageing process IMO.

And going hard aerobically a few times a week (one of the old Kona legends who was still racing in his 80's - forget his name - a doctor I think - said this.  He reckons going hard helps keep the telomeres on your chromosomes in good shape and ward off the negative effects of aging).

My tri days are over, and the sudden loss of that due to injury has taken me 7yrs to get out of my system.  I finally knew I was over it when I did my first local race in 7yrs last Oct and at the end just thought 'meh'.  Happy just to swim/gym/mtb now 5-6 days a week for no more than an hour per session to stay fitter than most 55yos.  I could do a little running, but I'm pretty sure it would be a very bad idea for my long-term health & my ambitions to ramp up my fishing guiding business.

 

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I haven't been in this game anywhere near as long as some of you.  And while I don't consider myself out of it, it'll just be random events now and then, purely for fun.  I've really felt, the last few years, that my body is failing me and I haven't been happy about it.  Nothing like what FP has been through, and others.  But the stroke felt like a last straw and has some bad days in the month or so following.  But I think I'm coming out of it.  I've started doing yoga which I think I'm going to enjoy, especially once I get better at it.  And once this great stuff is sorted I'll probably get back to the better riding group, and maybe a few more strenuous classes at the gym.  Of course, I'm sitting here writing all this and haven't bothered to put my teeth in yet today, so looking even more older.......

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I will be hitting the big 60 at the end of May this year. Apart from 2009 (when I had multiple operations/recovery after a bike crash), I have been competing in competitive sport since 1967. That's over 50 years - competing in rugby league (13 years), basketball (35 years), triathlon (31 years) and various years of race swimming and running. Whilst the body has some wear and tear, I have been quite lucky with no major wear injuries even though I have been basically overweight for the past 20 years. The knees ache occasionally but the physio said that that is normal for my age. She did say however, that if I just stop and do nothing then they will get worse.

Over the past 10 -15 years, my running times have decreased significantly. I think the majority of that has been my weight. My swimming has been around par even though I have a titanium collarbone. My cycling has improved - definitely from more miles. It says to me that I did not live up to my full potential in triathlon in my early years.

Some of my personal observations for my longevity:-

* Enjoying what you do is important. This includes enjoying your own company

* Giving the body a break. I always have about a month off each year to give me a break. I still do a little exercise (golf, swim, surf etc). I also take a day off if I am feeling exhausted (mentally/physically)

* Core strength. I have been doing core work for over 25 years. This includes boxing, swiss ball etc

* Slow twitch fibres. I really cannot sprint but can go all day. People with speed seem to burn out faster.  

* Genes. Something you can't really change. This includes being flexible (although i have noticed the last 2 years I have tightened up).

The thing for me that is changing is the mental side. Whilst i still enjoy the challenge, I am not as aggressive within myself. i doubt myself more. Sometimes this weighs on your mind as you feel like you are starting to lose your "edge". Just like you Ian, I have to be doing something as well as having an end game race objective. I don't really like playing games online - I love the physical side and moving. 

One issue i have had over the past 10 years or so is that I am never satisfied with my results (work/exercise/family). I always feel I can do better. I do some planning but some/most times fall short of where I want to be. Maybe my expectation doesn't match the reality. I need to enjoy the process more and accept that life doesn't get in the way of training - that IS life.

FM

Edited by Flanman
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I'm early 40's and have realised that the lack of strength, core and glute training was causing injuries while running. Also taking care of myself properly.

I've gone back to the gym, I do core, glute and stretch work at home and I get a massage weekly (or fightnightly) while training for longer events like Port 70.3 as the long runs are taxing. After Port it will drop back to monthly.

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The massage - acupuncture - chiro adjustments are a must "old trucks need a lot of maintenance" 😏

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HTFU 50+ formula   =   Happy The Fark Up,

Recommended for those who have realized that there a life to be lived and enjoyed in whatever direction that takes you

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I'm 60.

I do stuff every day, I eat OK, I rest when I'm tired, I try to do things that make me happy.  

I don't care if I never do another triathlon, plenty of other things to do.

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The majority of younger people i work with have worse attitudes than the oldies. In a more social setting like sport they are a bit different.

Edited by Merv

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7 hours ago, AP said:

I think I am probably the oldest regular poster on this site who is still competing, for me the "secret" if there is one is to mix with younger people, still do what you enjoy doing, stick with people you can laugh a lot with.

I have worked with a bunch of miserable old pricks when I was in my early twenties, and I can tell you misery is contagious. I think I needed to work with them to learn that lesson early in life. Since moving on from there I have always employed fun people, surrounded myself with fun people, people who enjoy life.

As far as peerformance goes I accept that I no longer finish an Ironman in the daylight, on average I have lost 7min per year in my Ironman time over the past 20yrs.

I believe staying healthy is heavily dependant on the company you keep, the diet you consume, and doing some exercise every day. The exercise has to be fun, you have to enjoy what you do. Accept that your goals and interests will change, but again they're influenced by the company you keep.

Humans are basically pack animals, choose your tribe carefully 😏

The only thing here that you missed AP is "belief". You need to believe you can do it (believe in yourself).

My Dad is 92. Just had major shoulder reconstruction in November. Has slowed him down a touch (no more golf) etc.

Still drives down the South Coast and still travels. Through his 70's and early 80's he still worked (Saturdays and relief work). Note: is a Pharmacist. My mum used to get the poos that he still worked. He didn't do it for the money.... he did it because he enjoyed it, he enjoyed seeing the customers, he enjoyed keeping the mind active and most importantly he did it because he still believe he could do it better than young people in their 20's, 30's 40's etc.

He had the "belief" in himself!!!!

 

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I'll be 55 in a few months. I realised 7 years ago that I could no longer train and race full throttle.

In 2012, I returned from Japan having run the Sakura-michi 250km and finished my 25th IM Aust two weeks later. Summer had been regular 200km training weeks with monthly long runs of at least 90km in preparation for Sakura-michi, but when I tried to ramp up the mileage again over winter, I realised the my left knee could no longer sustain the mileage to run big races. And I didn't want to attempt them half-arsed. Sakura-michi was my ideal farewell to ultra running.

It had been 29 years since my first marathon and probably over 800 races all up. Who knows, maybe even 1000. I knew I still wanted to be active into my 70s, including being able to work in a physical job, so I had no misgivings about going from focused (albeit mediocre) athlete to sporting dilettante.

The intervening years have been about enjoying myself, staying active and keeping generally fit. Playing hockey with my brother (a new sport for me), bushwalking, canyoning, rock climbing, even a little 6-a-side soccer and trapeze lessons. There's still some cycling and running, though usually on a social level. IM Aust is increasingly a year-by-year proposition.

I even had an attempt at marathon swimming a couple of years ago with 2017 being a year of minimal running and cycling in an attempt to lay down enough blubber to become the Paulrus.

I no longer run more than a half marathon on the road, but I may squeeze out an occasional short trail ultra on limited training. I ran fewer training miles than race miles in 2018, even with the sum of my year's racing being less than 200km. One 45 minute orienteering event (7km or so?), Six Foot Track 45km, Mt Solitary 45km, Port Macq and Wild Goose 54km after arriving in WA.

This summer I've used tri as a rehab goal after sustaining a high-grade quad tear in October. I never knew that when tendon and muscle sever, you can actually feel the quad muscle snap back as it contracts toward your hip! :cry:

Since Xmas, I have been either running, cycling, climbing or swimming every day, often just 5 km of running or 25 km on the bike. I've finished two ODTri's and almost felt like I was racing. A few weeks ago, I shuffled through a 50 km trail race, even though my "long run"  beforehand was 13 km. And my climbing is almost back to where I was prior to the injury.

Still love pinning on a number and racing as hard as I possibly can on the day, just that my body and training only allows me to do so over shorter distances. The occasional long stuff is just about getting through and enjoying the day.

For the time being, I'll just keep enjoying what I'm doing. Though I do need to make a firm decision regarding Port.

Edited by Paul Every
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2 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

The only thing here that you missed AP is "belief". You need to believe you can do it (believe in yourself).

My Dad is 92. Just had major shoulder reconstruction in November. Has slowed him down a touch (no more golf) etc.

Still drives down the South Coast and still travels. Through his 70's and early 80's he still worked (Saturdays and relief work). Note: is a Pharmacist. My mum used to get the poos that he still worked. He didn't do it for the money.... he did it because he enjoyed it, he enjoyed seeing the customers, he enjoyed keeping the mind active and most importantly he did it because he still believe he could do it better than young people in their 20's, 30's 40's etc.

He had the "belief" in himself!!!!

 

Reminds me of hearing Sir Chris Bonington speak last year.

His son recounted how Sir Chris said to him, "I still want to be doing what I'm doing now, in 10 years time." Not an unusual sentiment, but not often heard from a mountaineer celebrating his 80th birthday.  :eek::thumbsup:

 

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1 hour ago, Paul Every said:

 I knew I still wanted to be active into my 70s,

 

Just like his incredible mum!

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I was 56 in January this year. Last year, I rode almost 15,000k and ran just over 1,500k. Didn't do a race.

There were some harder efforts, but mostly easy to moderate. It was all about getting out there on the bike or on the run. Still used the Garmin to record activities, but not to drive me and I thought I was fit and reasonably toned.

Until I hit the surf in January!! No matter what you do out of the water ( or even if you swim 10k a week ), nothing beats surfing to get fit for surfing. I got caught inside a few times and really suffered, couldn't catch 2 waves in a row - had to sit up and take a breather in between.

One other thing I found was being lean (65kg) in January I ended up with sore ribs after surfing. Being here in the US since then and not really exercising due to minus 30 degrees and snow outside, I put on around 3kg. I was home for a week last week, and carrying that extra few kilos made paddling much better on the ribs. I didn't suffer as much on day 2, but still need to get surf fitness.  

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FP in terms of bike riding and sustaining younger levels - it can be difficult to control. I have always been ok on a bike and not really had to do a lot of traditional miles on the road. A car accident and broken neck sorted that out quick smart.

I ride 4 times a week - this morning we did a turbo session of one hour. A few of us punching out intervals at varying intensities an cadences.

w/u 5 to 10 mins easy spin

8 x 3 minute efforts - i minute sprint (rpm over 100) 1 minute easy 1 minute heavy climb

5 x 2 minute efforts - 2 minutes heavy (270-300 watts) 1 minute easy

c/d 5 - 10 minutes easy

Always with others at the gym which makes it more enjoyable. On the back of that and some other step sets and sustained efforts I can still punch out a reasonable 20k in a sprint race or 40k in a standard. Once I ride the national park once a week and add that in if there is a big race coming up I go to another level again - but that is rare because the kids dominate our time on the weekends. In short, you have to do the threshold work as a 50+ athlete or the decline will be a lot faster.

I swim 4x a week between 2.5-3k. Only look at the clock once a week. I'll do a set of 12 x 200 on 3 minutes coming in between 2.30-2.40. the other sessions I swim as i feel. Some swims are akin to drowning while others can be quality. I enjoy the swimming and it's a key activity as we get older.

All the training only adds up to 8 or 9 hours a week and never impacts upon the kids. I wanted to race forster this weekend but kids have too much hockey. Next one will be Port Stephens or possibly Wollongong in April.

Edited by Coach@triathlon
200s not 400s ty peter!
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6 minutes ago, Coach@triathlon said:

 I'll do a set of 12 x 400 on 3 minutes 

Really?

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I knew you were a bloody top athlete but my head was, WTF I really need to work on my swimming.

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I started exercising regularly whilst in secondary school and have maintained that regime throughout my life. Not only do I enjoy using my body but I also relish the health benefits of such a lifestyle. I was swimming, cycling, and running on a regular basis before triathlon was invented and now that my knee prevents me from running any serious distance, I continue to alternate between swimming and cycling at least six days per week.  I have also taken up mountain biking but at 70 years of age the body does not like the few falls I have had.

Given the non-weight bearing nature of swimming and cycling, I expect to continue these activities until I can't find my way home. Fortunately I have ticked off all of my goals in triathlon so I no longer feel the need to prove something to myself. 

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Am 50yo.

Ambition has always exceeded talent.

Still have goals I'm yet to achieve.

Refusing to let reality overwhelm my delusions.

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I turn 65 this June. Ran my first marathon in 85 and have done a total of 18 but last one some years ago. My first IM in 2002 being a 13:15, my best being a 12:54 in 2006 - IM Oz. I've done 7. I still have goals of getting to 20 marathons but I think I may be done for IM because of commitment and cost.

I am still doing pretty much the same routine I always have. Plan is run 2-3 times per week, Ride 2-3 times, swim 1 or 2 and some strength training. Usually fail a couple of times though but I believe recovery is more Important than it used to be so that doesn't worry me.

Did Husky Ultra recently and finished pretty close to a PB I did at Canberra Half in 2006 although rumour has it the ride was short and the swim was long. Main thing for me was that I felt strong on the run. 

I agree with AP that mixing it with younger people in the Tri Club and like minded individuals generally is key. I do run with Billies Bushies which boasts some tough older guys (than me) though including the great Bob Telfer. They keep me in my place.

I am very grateful I can still run as it is my favourite discipline. My joints seem to be ok although it takes me much longer to warm up or I risk calf injuries in particular. My run is slower these days.

I have a pretty good diet and manage to keep weight down (68-70kgs). I enjoy a beer a little too much but training and racing has been my saviour in that area. I hate to think what my life could have been like without endurance sport!

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4 hours ago, Coach@triathlon said:

Next one will be Port Stephens or possibly Wollongong in April.

See you in the Gong if you are down there (although it is a Saturday). I think you should also come to Kev.

FM

Edited by Flanman
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On 27 March 2019 at 10:31 AM, ComfortablyNumb said:

Strength training as you get older is a big key to holding back the ageing process IMO.

And going hard aerobically a few times a week (one of the old Kona legends who was still racing in his 80's - forget his name - a doctor I think - said this.  He reckons going hard helps keep the telomeres on your chromosomes in good shape and ward off the negative effects of aging)..

 

Agree with you on this Numb one. I've always had a strength program as part of my training no matter what sport I was competing in. Soccer, rugby, running and triathlon. At various stages of my sporting career having a strength program helped recovery from an injury and prevent a reoccurrence. It's worked for me for 40 years and I keep doing it as I believe it works for me. I know some don't believe in a strength program, but that's their perogative. 

The going hard aerobically is good as well. It's the recovery time to get over it that none of the old buggers tell you about! We are all different and our recovery time will differ. Learning this bit about yourself as you get older,  is the secret to continued competition successfully and enjoying it.

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On 27/03/2019 at 8:50 AM, FatPom said:

 

I'll always enter stuff, a lifestyle of training with no events has zero appeal to me. Just feel like it's time to stop trying to do everything at full tilt, all the time. I wonder if anyone feels the same?

 

This is how I feel about the sport, train to race. But race for the challenge and enjoyment

I have always had a 10 year rule on PB's, after 10 years they don't count. And like you a major injury, that means my sport PB's before injury don't count.

I tend to pick race i want to do, not because they are there. My racing quantity has certainly dropped and now it is about enjoying the challenge, not chasing the time.

I have always had a high off road content (MTB, Trail run) to my races and find them enjoyable, with moving to some of the multi-day festival races that have a high social part after a stage. Rather than it all being on one day

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Hey Flanny, I was doing Wollongong until some ahole clipped the back of my car hit and run - it was $880 to repair. I've raced a few times over recent months and kinda decided I'd spent enough. Pity though, the gong is a good one.

 

Cheers.

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It's the recovery time to get over it that none of the old buggers tell you about! We are all different and our recovery time will differ. Learning this bit about yourself as you get older,  is the secret to continued competition successfully and enjoying it.

Yes that's for sure - I do everything right in recovery from training - younger guys can break a few rules but we can't

I only ever run twice a week now days - been doing that for 5yrs - guys I coach over fifty never run two days in a row - it's more the running that takes the time to get over

When I'm training long Sunday sessions for an Ironman it's often Thursday before I feel recovered from Sunday - I can still train and do things but I can still feel the long Sunday workout in my legs on Wednesday

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7 minutes ago, AP said:

I only ever run twice a week now days

Interesting as I was listening to a podcast recently by an older top pro and he said the same.  2 key sessionsIntervals and a long run.  The other runs are just for general fitness if you were only running.  But if you are also swimming and riding, you get your general fitness from them.  So only run 2 times a week.  maybe a 3rd off the bike if you really need too.

When's tip 3 coming @AP?  How about a nutrition one?

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Right now I reckon I'm doing as many active minutes of activity a week as I was when I was trying to race more regularly.  Actually, probably more now.  But it's all easy stuff atm, walking, some swimming and easy cycling.  Now I've added in 2 or 3 Yoga sessions a week, may be 4 or 5 this week if the rain keeps up.  

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When's tip 3 coming @AP?  How about a nutrition one?

 

Mondays

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On 27/03/2019 at 10:28 PM, Coach@triathlon said:

FP in terms of bike riding and sustaining younger levels - it can be difficult to control. I have always been ok on a bike and not really had to do a lot of traditional miles on the road. A car accident and broken neck sorted that out quick smart.

I ride 4 times a week - this morning we did a turbo session of one hour. A few of us punching out intervals at varying intensities an cadences.

w/u 5 to 10 mins easy spin

8 x 3 minute efforts - i minute sprint (rpm over 100) 1 minute easy 1 minute heavy climb

5 x 2 minute efforts - 2 minutes heavy (270-300 watts) 1 minute easy

c/d 5 - 10 minutes easy

Always with others at the gym which makes it more enjoyable. On the back of that and some other step sets and sustained efforts I can still punch out a reasonable 20k in a sprint race or 40k in a standard. Once I ride the national park once a week and add that in if there is a big race coming up I go to another level again - but that is rare because the kids dominate our time on the weekends. In short, you have to do the threshold work as a 50+ athlete or the decline will be a lot faster.

I swim 4x a week between 2.5-3k. Only look at the clock once a week. I'll do a set of 12 x 200 on 3 minutes coming in between 2.30-2.40. the other sessions I swim as i feel. Some swims are akin to drowning while others can be quality. I enjoy the swimming and it's a key activity as we get older.

All the training only adds up to 8 or 9 hours a week and never impacts upon the kids. I wanted to race forster this weekend but kids have too much hockey. Next one will be Port Stephens or possibly Wollongong in April.

Thanks Mick, some good food for thought there.  It's funny about how we think about hard efforts. last year, despite having a good IM Wales and a good stand alone marathon at LCW, the race that I consider biggest achievement of the year was a duathlon way back in Feb. It was 5/20/5 and I managed 20:17 - 28:55 - 21:57 and came second in the over 40AG  (only two AGs under/over 40).

That hurt like hell and was on the back of a winter of pretty dedicated threshold training.  Going that deep in the well seems like a bloody lifetime ago this year. :(

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6 hours ago, FatPom said:

Going that deep in the well seems like a bloody lifetime ago this year. :(

This is what I enjoy about MTB.  If you ride proper single tracks, you'll go deep into the well on some uphill segments like it or not. But you are so busy concentrating on your lines and staying upright, it's easier to take, and then you get recovery on the fast downhill bits - which again you don't really notice - because you are so busy trying to stay upright, and get your cornering technique right, or not nosedive over the handlebars on the jumps.

Deep into the the well for me now is a HR of 160.  Anything in the 150s is hard. I rarely bother with a HR monitor now though, just ride train to feel, though sometimes on the MTB will strap it on just out of academic interest.

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On 27/03/2019 at 12:50 PM, trifun said:

HTFU 50+ formula   =   Happy The Fark Up,

Recommended for those who have realized that there a life to be lived and enjoyed in whatever direction that takes you

Awesome 

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On 27/03/2019 at 8:54 AM, Ex-Hasbeen said:

One of the guys that works with me went to his doctor a few years ago when he hurt his shoulder. He was late 40's. He'd done some damage to his collarbone playing touch football. His doctor asked him what exercise he did, and he told him soccer, touch, swimming, running, and a bit of volleyball.

The doctor told him he could operate, but the problem may not be totally gone, or he could just "act his age"

I'd be looking for a new doctor.

Orthopaedic surgeons are required to explain how the outcomes of contemplated surgery (not guaranteed) compare with your current state.

In my case, a meniscus flap tear was causing enough discomfort I was suffering muscle atrophy, with associated impacts (eg patella tracking problems). While trimming the tear further reduced cartilage (I’m down to ~50% and studies suggest at materially higher arthritis risk), the potential upside (being able to resume walking pain free and running) made it an easy choice.

So while going to a surgeon for a “fix” may not be a panacea, it can also be life changing...

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3 hours ago, trilobite said:

Orthopaedic surgeons are required to explain how the outcomes of contemplated surgery (not guaranteed) compare with your current state.

In my case, a meniscus flap tear was causing enough discomfort I was suffering muscle atrophy, with associated impacts (eg patella tracking problems). While trimming the tear further reduced cartilage (I’m down to ~50% and studies suggest at materially higher arthritis risk), the potential upside (being able to resume walking pain free and running) made it an easy choice.

So while going to a surgeon for a “fix” may not be a panacea, it can also be life changing...

I understand that side of the doctor's comments, but telling him to act his age? 

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If anyone's seen my hair, then they'd know acting my age is not a phrase that applies....

Maybe it's more so admitting my age..... my body keeps reminding me of my age...

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