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AP's training tip #2

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49 minutes ago, Oompa Loompa said:

AP remains the man of this house. 

Could you refer to him as an Elder?

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Wise words AP - consistent discipline is the one thing missing in most triathletes personalities and characters.

I wonder how many triathletes would be self-effacing enough to admit they don't have the required discipline to enjoy triathlon as a competitive sport and a lifestyle that adds value rather than takes away from their lives?

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This is great. And def for other aspects of life - I need to work on this with my study and household chores! 

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Something I have found amazing over the years is the amount of activity, sport, study, life that some individuals can fit into the same number of hours that others have. I have are many examples, but I'll feature this one.

This guy was a young doctor, an intern at a hospital about 10-12min drive from Yeronga pool - he was training for Port and working 7am to 6pm if he could get away then. He would swim train with the squad 5.30 to 6.30 - jump out - run to the change rooms - run to his car and eat on the way - start at the hospital at 7am.

He'd then do another session after work. He qualified for Kona and trained in a similar way, did a respectable race in Kona.

He has gone on to study further and is now a pathologist - he still competes and has a couple of kids.

He's a man who uses his hours well 😎

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I don't understand why people need to be told this stuff. 

Wheel out your next tip Al.

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Once heard someone say, if you dont have time, you don't have priorities. 

Everyone's priorities are different. 

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People being late to anything is just rude. 

They are just saying their time is more important than yours.  

Well Fark them. 

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2 hours ago, AP said:

Something I have found amazing over the years is the amount of activity, sport, study, life that some individuals can fit into the same number of hours that others have. I have are many examples, but I'll feature this one.

This guy was a young doctor, an intern at a hospital about 10-12min drive from Yeronga pool - he was training for Port and working 7am to 6pm if he could get away then. He would swim train with the squad 5.30 to 6.30 - jump out - run to the change rooms - run to his car and eat on the way - start at the hospital at 7am.

He'd then do another session after work. He qualified for Kona and trained in a similar way, did a respectable race in Kona.

He has gone on to study further and is now a pathologist - he still competes and has a couple of kids.

He's a man who uses his hours well 😎

Did he have a family? When you are single it's a lot easier to cram heaps in as any 'down' time can be soley sleep or zombie mode. But when you have family you kind of have to save some energy for them.

I imagine his evenings would consist mostly of eat then sleep.

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worked for 2 hours from 6 am, rode 2 hours on trainer took kids to pool 2 more hours with 2 as intervals

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1 hour ago, more said:

Did he have a family? When you are single it's a lot easier to cram heaps in as any 'down' time can be soley sleep or zombie mode. But when you have family you kind of have to save some energy for them.

I imagine his evenings would consist mostly of eat then sleep.

Family is the most common excuse out there. 

Go to a roll down ceremony and watch how many guys and gals get there families on stage for photos. Pete Murrays favourite joke is counting the cost of each kid going to Kona.

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Just "having a family" doesn't mean anything.

Doing things with them, and doing household things does. 

Lots of folks have a very supportive spouse who does kid stuff, cooking, shopping, cleaning, lawns etc. 

That shit takes time. 

There can be no general rule. 

But turning up late to anything usually avoidable

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30 minutes ago, prizna said:

Family is the most common excuse out there. 

Go to a roll down ceremony and watch how many guys and gals get there families on stage for photos. Pete Murrays favourite joke is counting the cost of each kid going to Kona.

Do you have children 

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1 hour ago, more said:

Did he have a family? When you are single it's a lot easier to cram heaps in as any 'down' time can be soley sleep or zombie mode. But when you have family you kind of have to save some energy for them.

I imagine his evenings would consist mostly of eat then sleep.

Being single, I just love how all of the domestics just do themselves. Married people need to get on to this, just come home, sit down and eat, then go to sleep. 😉

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10 minutes ago, Slunnie said:

Being single, I just love how all of the domestics just do themselves. Married people need to get on to this, just come home, sit down and eat, then go to sleep. 😉

For sure. The dishes fairy and lawn gnome do a great job. Groceries deliver themselves and the dogs lick the floors clean. 

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AP's tip is closely aligned to TC's training tip #2

Get a wife. Then all that shopping, cleaning and shiiiite gets done for you. You really can simply, train, work and eat as soon as you walk in the door every night. Just make sure it's one of those forgiving, nurturing models, like the woman who married Ted Bundy when he was in jail.

 

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1 hour ago, prizna said:

Family is the most common excuse out there. 

 

Sure, at the expense of their family...easy to act like you don't have a family when you act like you don't have a family.

Training in the morning, working until 6 and then training again leaves basically zero family time. And any time you would have them you would be spent and not giving them 100%

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26 minutes ago, Slunnie said:

Being single, I just love how all of the domestics just do themselves. Married people need to get on to this, just come home, sit down and eat, then go to sleep. 😉

What's hard about chucking clothes in a washing machine or dryer-takes two seconds. Same with cooking dinner and then putting it in the dishwasher..?

When I was single I'd prepare all of my meals Sunday afternoons. Then just come  home, heat up and put a dish in the dish washer.  Certainly a little easier than with a family. If I was tired or couldn't be bothered a steak and broccoli took no time at all.

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24 minutes ago, more said:

What's hard about chucking clothes in a washing machine or dryer-takes two seconds. Same with cooking dinner and then putting it in the dishwasher..?

When I was single I'd prepare all of my meals Sunday afternoons. Then just come  home, heat up and put a dish in the dish washer.  Certainly a little easier than with a family. If I was tired or couldn't be bothered a steak and broccoli took no time at all.

So now that you're not single, how has this changed?

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32 minutes ago, The Customer said:

Get a wife. Then all that shopping, cleaning and shiiiite gets done for you. You really can simply, train, work and eat as soon as you walk in the door every night.

 

For it is to laugh!   Are you that wife???? ;)

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For a number of years, I was working a fulltime job with a 3 hour return trip, studying Uni via correspondence, kids aged 4 and 1, a home to look after, coaching/playing rep basketball, recovering from cancer and training for triathlons (Olympic distance). You can fit anything in if you want to.

FM

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22 minutes ago, The Customer said:

So now that you're not single, how has this changed?

Well the most obvious is the volume of everything increases 5 fold (depending on how many kids you have)

And then there is the being 'present' part.Are you married or have kids? To be a good partner or parent you need to have the energy to engage, take an interest in their day, read them books etc...you know act like you care.

Single all I had to do was come home eat and then sleep. Easy...

I can't believe this is even up for discussion...

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2 minutes ago, Flanman said:

For a number of years, I was working a fulltime job with a 3 hour return trip, studying Uni via correspondence, kids aged 4 and 1, a home to look after, coaching/playing rep basketball, recovering from cancer and training for triathlons (Olympic distance). You can fit anything in if you want to.

FM

And how much time could you possibly have had for your kids with that schedule? Let alone your wife?

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33 minutes ago, more said:

And how much time could you possibly have had for your kids with that schedule? Let alone your wife?

Tri training was mostly when they were asleep (i.e. 4am alarms). Study for Uni was on the train (~8 hours per week). Basketball was hard - 1 game and two training sessions a week. I was home from training about 11am on weekends. The family occasionally came with me to basketball games. Sometimes, I took the oldest son to basketball with me when I coached. He was always good.

I would see the kids for about an hour at night before they went to bed then three quarters of the weekend. No one was ever up before I left for work. When they were real young, I would also do a couple of night feeds.For me, 5 hours sleep (even now) is a good night.

My missus and I only spoke last week on holidays about how good we were as a mother and father (of each other). She thought I was a great dad. I may have been able to been at home longer. I am not sure if they would have ever turned out better than they are now - great adults, one a father and the other a great daughter  that cares for her family and friends.

I guess the missus missed out more than the kids. After 38 years of marriage, some rocky years, mostly great, I guess it worked out.

Sure it was tough - everything that is really worthwhile seems to pan out like that (except winning Lotto).

FM 

 

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3 hours ago, Peter said:

People being late to anything is just rude. 

They are just saying their time is more important than yours.  

Well Fark them. 

I hate to be late for anything. I tell me kids... better to be early than late.

I used to train with a guy through the late 80’s/90’s who  had a hatred of people turning up for a 6:00 am ride at 6:00 and then wanted to fill water bottles and pump up tyres. They soon got the message whe we rolled off at 06:00 and they spent the next 10kms trying to catch up.

His quote was I didn’t get up at 4:30 to ride at 06:05.

He did Kona 3 times. Sort of goes along the lines that AP is talking about.

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3 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

His quote was I didn’t get up at 4:30 to ride at 06:05.

This very topic was the main reason I walked away from trying coach a squad in the Middle East. Arabs just didn't have the same concept of time as the expats. Without fail, we had one guy from Saudi text saying he OTW for our weekend ride right at the time we needed to roll out. Every time, we left (on average) 30mins later than scheduled and yet the other Arabs would politely wait for him without question. We tried all kinds of tricks to get him there on time including giving him false start time but even that didn't work - it made it worse as after we tricked him once, he assumed that we would actually leave a later time than he was told every week!

You gotta realise how hot it gets there. In summer we rode at 5am, so you're getting up at 4am to get there and leave on time. If you're still out on the bike at 9am it's gonna be around 40 degree so I was pretty tired and cranky after getting up and 4am, just to stand around feeling the temperature rising waiting for these guys to show up only to finally roll out at 6.

The worst offender was an Arab woman - an amputee with one arm, who wanted to do the 70.3. I wasn't expecting her to have a shitty attitude. I told her she had my full attention and that I would give her one-on-one swim coaching til she was competent enough to join my group sessions. First session, I was waiting at the pool at 6am. I checked my phone and saw that she had texted me at 2am to tell me she would a 'little' late (LOL - she was out partying). She arrived at 7am. I explained to her that I don't check my phone during the night so if she could give me more warning in the future that would be helpful. The next day, it was worse - she was 90minutes late. I should have walked away but waited for her. she said that she was late because she was tired from a late night bike ride she had done with another coach the night before. I told her that it wasn't wise to break from the programme that I had provided for her because doing extra sessions would leave her too tired to come to my sessions. She started crying and told me not to tell her what to do!

Long story short, after 5 years of trying to get these people showing up on time, I gave up. It's no wonder the standard is so shiiite over there.

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7 hours ago, The Customer said:

This very topic was the main reason I walked away from trying coach a squad in the Middle East. Arabs just didn't have the same concept of time as the expats. Without fail, we had one guy from Saudi text saying he OTW for our weekend ride right at the time we needed to roll out. Every time, we left (on average) 30mins later than scheduled and yet the other Arabs would politely wait for him without question. We tried all kinds of tricks to get him there on time including giving him false start time but even that didn't work - it made it worse as after we tricked him once, he assumed that we would actually leave a later time than he was told every week!

You gotta realise how hot it gets there. In summer we rode at 5am, so you're getting up at 4am to get there and leave on time. If you're still out on the bike at 9am it's gonna be around 40 degree so I was pretty tired and cranky after getting up and 4am, just to stand around feeling the temperature rising waiting for these guys to show up only to finally roll out at 6.

The worst offender was an Arab woman - an amputee with one arm, who wanted to do the 70.3. I wasn't expecting her to have a shitty attitude. I told her she had my full attention and that I would give her one-on-one swim coaching til she was competent enough to join my group sessions. First session, I was waiting at the pool at 6am. I checked my phone and saw that she had texted me at 2am to tell me she would a 'little' late (LOL - she was out partying). She arrived at 7am. I explained to her that I don't check my phone during the night so if she could give me more warning in the future that would be helpful. The next day, it was worse - she was 90minutes late. I should have walked away but waited for her. she said that she was late because she was tired from a late night bike ride she had done with another coach the night before. I told her that it wasn't wise to break from the programme that I had provided for her because doing extra sessions would leave her too tired to come to my sessions. She started crying and told me not to tell her what to do!

Long story short, after 5 years of trying to get these people showing up on time, I gave up. It's no wonder the standard is so shiiite over there.

People in Dundee will take the same attitude to people being late for a pint

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8 hours ago, The Customer said:

This very topic was the main reason I walked away from trying coach a squad in the Middle East. Arabs just didn't have the same concept of time as the expats. Without fail, we had one guy from Saudi text saying he OTW for our weekend ride right at the time we needed to roll out. Every time, we left (on average) 30mins later than scheduled and yet the other Arabs would politely wait for him without question. We tried all kinds of tricks to get him there on time including giving him false start time but even that didn't work - it made it worse as after we tricked him once, he assumed that we would actually leave a later time than he was told every week!

You gotta realise how hot it gets there. In summer we rode at 5am, so you're getting up at 4am to get there and leave on time. If you're still out on the bike at 9am it's gonna be around 40 degree so I was pretty tired and cranky after getting up and 4am, just to stand around feeling the temperature rising waiting for these guys to show up only to finally roll out at 6.

The worst offender was an Arab woman - an amputee with one arm, who wanted to do the 70.3. I wasn't expecting her to have a shitty attitude. I told her she had my full attention and that I would give her one-on-one swim coaching til she was competent enough to join my group sessions. First session, I was waiting at the pool at 6am. I checked my phone and saw that she had texted me at 2am to tell me she would a 'little' late (LOL - she was out partying). She arrived at 7am. I explained to her that I don't check my phone during the night so if she could give me more warning in the future that would be helpful. The next day, it was worse - she was 90minutes late. I should have walked away but waited for her. she said that she was late because she was tired from a late night bike ride she had done with another coach the night before. I told her that it wasn't wise to break from the programme that I had provided for her because doing extra sessions would leave her too tired to come to my sessions. She started crying and told me not to tell her what to do!

Long story short, after 5 years of trying to get these people showing up on time, I gave up. It's no wonder the standard is so shiiite over there.

You were about 4yrs and 11mts more patient than I would have been!

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5 minutes ago, FatPom said:

You were about 4yrs and 11mts more patient than I would have been!

Yep

i can’t stand folks being late 

one of the main reasons I’ll never to bunch rides or sessions (plus nobugger will ever come with me due to the hrs I go at )

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I hate late!

When people are late to something that impacts others it's just rude and arrogant.

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I always start my sessions exactly on time. People learn pretty quick. I've never had an athlete complain that I didn't wait for them and numerous people have commented they are happy I start on time.

As for TC's experiences, if the athlete had not arrived after 15 mins, I'd go home. No way I would wait 90 mins to run a 60 min session

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14 hours ago, Greyman said:

I don't understand why people need to be told this stuff. 

Wheel out your next tip Al.

How is it working for you

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11 hours ago, more said:

And how much time could you possibly have had for your kids with that schedule? Let alone your wife?

I repeat, family is the most common excuse.

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Some people see family as an excuse. I see it as a priority. I would rather spend my spare time with the ones I love. This is one of the reasons why I don’t train with a squad. I do what I can when I can. I would rather cross the line into the arms of my family ( they volunteer at Ironman) then cross the line get KQ spot & return to an empty hotel room. Yeah yeah yeah I know you can have both but for me it’s not worth the risk or the effort, 

Example: I was meant to ride 120km on Saturday. 

My daughter wanted to do Parkrun & breakfast at the cafe. I spent the rest of the day driving her to two birthday parties, netball & then droppped her off at a sleepover. I managed to sneak out for a 45km ride later in the afternoon. Organized dinner out with my wife & friends via text messages while stopped at the lights. Raced in the door & straight into the shower. Friends arrived 5min after I got home 10min  later I was in the car & driving everyone out to dinner. 

I’m currently doing 12hr shifts at work & still managed to ride 320km & spend time duty the family. 

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People seem to think that in order to do triathlon training you have to somehow compromise family time 

My wife and I have been together since her kids were 2 and 5yrs

Last night we had a family dinner for the son's birthday - he's now 28 - he has an engineering degree and masters in site management, is fit and healthy, is in the process of launching his, and his partners new business venture making a sports/health bar - both work full time in their professions

His 25yr old sister has a law degree and journalism degree and works for channel nine in Brisbane, her partner is an accountant currently studying for his CA and training for Port Mac

These kids grew up in a family where their mother has done 15 IMs and around 50 HIM - I have done about 30 IMs  since coming into their life

These kids have grown up using their hours efficiently - the son is on the road at 5.15 to drive to his job at the sunshine coast - the daughter left home at 4.15 this morning to be at Mt Cootha at 4.30am to go through the news items for the day's leads - both are lean, fit and healthy, exercise regularly and are valued employees 

The example you set for your family is an investment in their future 😏

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21 hours ago, FatPom said:

You were about 4yrs and 11mts more patient than I would have been!

Ya gotta understand that I was in the minority. Any display of frustration when people were late reflected badly on myself, like it was me who had the problem 😂😂😂

There was one horrid woman who signed up for a 4 week programme. I gave her a full refund after the first week. For every session she attended in that first week she would arrive in time to do the cool down, disrupting everyone with her inability to put her bike on the turbo trainer and letting her mouth run. She didn't work and had no kids. I have no idea how you could be 50mins late for a 1hr turbo session but she nailed that remarkable feat everytime.

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16 minutes ago, AP said:

People seem to think that in order to do triathlon training you have to somehow compromise family time 

My wife and I have been together since her kids were 2 and 5yrs

Last night we had a family dinner for the son's birthday - he's now 28 - he has an engineering degree and masters in site management, is fit and healthy, is in the process of launching his, and his partners new business venture making a sports/health bar - both work full time in their professions

His 25yr old sister has a law degree and journalism degree and works for channel nine in Brisbane, her partner is an accountant currently studying for his CA and training for Port Mac

These kids grew up in a family where their mother has done 15 IMs and around 50 HIM - I have done about 30 IMs  since coming into their life

These kids have grown up using their hours efficiently - the son is on the road at 5.15 to drive to his job at the sunshine coast - the daughter left home at 4.15 this morning to be at Mt Cootha at 4.30am to go through the news items for the day's leads - both are lean, fit and healthy, exercise regularly and are valued employees 

The example you set for your family is an investment in their future 😏

That's great, but everyone has a different idea of quality. My father worked relentlessly when I was growing up, we have followed his lead and we are all a very successful family. BUT TBH there are a lot of times I really wish he spent more time with us and I have had my family say the same to me. 

I'm not going to make that mistake- family comes first and then if there is time left for training then great.

Training in the morning is easy. But then working until 6, doing a second session and not getting home until 8ish is just selfish in my opinion. Sure you can act like a hero and say you have fit it all in, your kids will probably turn out o.k and be successful and if you are o.k with that then good for you. 

I work with CEO's and GM's who are all extremely successful and manage to squeeze everything in. But I guarantee you the kids come second whether they like to admit it or not. 

Hopefully when the kids get older we can train together, then family time is also training time.

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1 hour ago, prizna said:

I repeat, family is the most common excuse.

One mans excuse is another mans valid reason.

I have knocked back roles paying another $50k per year-my 'excuse' was family....to me the money  wouldn't even come close to compensating the time I would miss from my family.

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My training programs are usually all morning sessions so that life in the evenings can be as "normal as possible" the only exceptions are for tradies or people who have to start real early 

I rarely ever train in the evening - I like to keep 24hrs between sessions for maximum recovery time 😎

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6 minutes ago, AP said:

My training programs are usually all morning sessions so that life in the evenings can be as "normal as possible" the only exceptions are for tradies or people who have to start real early 

I rarely ever train in the evening - I like to keep 24hrs between sessions for maximum recovery time 😎

My clock on time is 5:30am 

 

I got up regularly at 2-2:30am and trained for Busso. Then I did another session in the afternoon. 

If you want it. Go get it. 

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52 minutes ago, more said:

One mans excuse is another mans valid reason.

What do you consider the difference between an excuse and a reason? A reason is when you own something — a problem, a solution — to justify your actions, whether positive or negative. An excuse is when you give up ownership of a problem or solution.

 

I don't debate that but so many don't take ownership of the facts.

1 hour ago, Bored@work said:

 the effort, 

Reason and excuse.

 

1 hour ago, Bored@work said:

via text messages while stopped at the lights.

You're a cock. For the safety of others please do not do this, before you attempt to justify it as being okay because you're stopped. It is not. 

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