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Advice for first 70.3

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11 hours ago, BNothling said:

I've always explained to people that I work with that their nerves are their body's way of being prepared for something extraordinary that they are about to accomplish. Essentially, if they aren't nervous, they either aren't mentally prepared for it or aren't giving the event enough credit.

Feel the nerves, acknowledge them, appreciate their presence and tear shit up.

If I don't have 3 nervous shits pre-race, I know my heart is not in it.

Luckily my Geelong accomodation is close to the course, so I won't have to worry about lining up at the port-a-loos

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On 11/02/2019 at 8:17 AM, BNothling said:

I've always explained to people that I work with that their nerves are their body's way of being prepared for something extraordinary that they are about to accomplish. Essentially, if they aren't nervous, they either aren't mentally prepared for it or aren't giving the event enough credit.

Feel the nerves, acknowledge them, appreciate their presence and tear shit up.

I'm not nervous at all before races. I've obviously never been mentally prepared. Nor given an event due credit.

Although, I most definitely get excited.

I was even excited last Sunday about racing 8 km at Masters Athletics. Perhaps if I was nervous as well as excited, I would have run a bit quicker. I'm not sure how though, I was running the last 2 km at puke-threshold pace while desperately trying to shake off the three other guys whom I'd been battling since before halfway.

I go into a race either confident of my preparation to deliver the best I can, or (more commonly these days) if undertrained, at least comfortable with my ability to pull through and enjoy whatever challenges the day presents. Either way I'm excited and appreciative to be there on race morning, feeling happy and relaxed.

All positive emotions. No place for nerves. Just out there enjoying my racing.

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Paul I'll suggest you make up the smallest percentage of the field.  That's ok, and so is what the other 99% of us feel on the start line.

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4 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Possibly Paul, what you call excitement, a lot of others call nerves.

Possibly for some. Although over the years, I have seen many genuinely nervous people before races.

Those whose nerves limit the frequency, distance or size of the races they choose.

Scott Tinley wrote an insightful piece about pre-race nerves way back in the day. Unfortunately google isn't helping me find it.

 

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Whilst I totally get the nerves thing, I must say I am more like Paul in that I get excited, not so much nervous before the race. I know if I have put the work in or not, and by race race day its too late to start worrying about it then.

I do get a little nervous however about whether I will get time for 3 toilet visits prior 😂. Once that is done I am all good.

Cheers

NSF

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I'm not so nervous about the race, what will be will be, but am VERY nervous about the swim having been in such an environment before.

Hopefully I can just start at the back and not get in to many people's way.

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

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20 minutes ago, more said:

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

Done by age group, Start times are listed on page 19 of the AIG - http://www.velothon.com/~/media/8e8816707f8f4a11836f7377aba46f16/as im70 3geeaig 05feb19v1.pdf

If you look at the athlete list, you will be able to work out how many in your wave, and approx how many will swim over you (not many for me, only wave behind mine is the teams wave)

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57 minutes ago, more said:

I'm not so nervous about the race, what will be will be, but am VERY nervous about the swim having been in such an environment before.

Hopefully I can just start at the back and not get in to many people's way.

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

Hi mate,

I wouldn't be too worried as the waves are not that big and given the few minutes between each wave everyone spreads out a bit and the water clarity allows faster swimmers to see you before swimming over you. Just get in there and hold your line and you should be ok.

Also the current assistance really benefits slower swimmers more than faster (IMO) so the time differences are not as great.

Good luck with your race.

NSF

 

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@more the wave starts are no bigger than the wstc events.  You'll be fine.

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

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1 hour ago, Cape_Horn said:

Done by age group, Start times are listed on page 19 of the AIG - http://www.velothon.com/~/media/8e8816707f8f4a11836f7377aba46f16/as im70 3geeaig 05feb19v1.pdf

If you look at the athlete list, you will be able to work out how many in your wave, and approx how many will swim over you (not many for me, only wave behind mine is the teams wave)

Hmm ok so I have  the M 35-39 and the teams behind me. Don't swim over me Horn ;)

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53 minutes ago, Notsofast said:

Hi mate,

I wouldn't be too worried as the waves are not that big and given the few minutes between each wave everyone spreads out a bit and the water clarity allows faster swimmers to see you before swimming over you. Just get in there and hold your line and you should be ok.

Also the current assistance really benefits slower swimmers more than faster (IMO) so the time differences are not as great.

Good luck with your race.

NSF

 

Cheers mate!!

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23 minutes ago, Peter said:

@more the wave starts are no bigger than the wstc events.  You'll be fine.

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

Lol true, I normally don't get nervous until I stand around seeing everyone else nervous which makes me nervous..

So I think Im all set, pushy is in getting a service tomorrow, have all my gells, race belt, hydration etc sorted. For the bike I'm planning on have my shoes in with the rubber bands so I can run to the mount line but instead of risking a flying mount I'm going to then stop and mount normally-sound like a good idea?

Now 'there aint nuthin to it but to do it' :thumbsup:

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3 minutes ago, more said:

Lol true, I normally don't get nervous until I stand around seeing everyone else nervous which makes me nervous..

So I think Im all set, pushy is in getting a service tomorrow, have all my gells, race belt, hydration etc sorted. For the bike I'm planning on have my shoes in with the rubber bands so I can run to the mount line but instead of risking a flying mount I'm going to then stop and mount normally-sound like a good idea?

Now 'there aint nuthin to it but to do it' :thumbsup:

For a 70.3, this is exactly what I do. Safer than running X distance in cycling shoes, but still relatively conservative. I'd rather take the extra 5s to get going over the course of 5:30 and know that I'm not going to ruin my race trying to flying mount.

Also my 2c regarding the swim, you'll find that pretty much everyone except the gun swimmers are just trying to get in and get out with the minimal amount of fuss and so it's nowhere near as frantic as a shorter distance race. I've found that everyone gives everyone heaps of room and it's quite easy to find your own space in the water and do your own thing.

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On 11/01/2019 at 12:18 PM, zed said:

Perhaps if you are mal-coordinated it could be perceived as being dangerous..

Check how many people are still pissing around 200m up the road trying to get their feet in their shoes... and not just noobs.

I resemble that comment.🤣  I start with the shoes clipped onto the pedals.  I don't want to be running around on uneven surface in cleats, the risk to roll an ankle is there and very real (and seriously after training for a half or full, what a waste it would be).  Most accidents happen outside of T1 with people trying to clip in at low speeds, wobbling around in amongst a bunch of others doing the same thing. 

I can no longer jump on the moving bike (especially with the biddons behind the seat......just not that flexible any more)  So I get past the mount line away from others, lean bike over, swing leg over and then start to peddle up to speed.  Once at speed, in goes the 1st foot, peddle back up to speed, put in 2nd foot and then back up to speed.  This generally keeps me well clear of all others and there is no way that I'm within 400m of the mount line at this point.   

If you can do this in 100 metres I'm guessing your HR just went through the roof and this is not a sprint race no need to spike the HR.

With Geelong having the big U turn just before you head up the hill, its best to be clipped in and settled prior to that turn, so for different courses there can be a different approach.

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21 hours ago, Peter said:

 

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

I've been thinking about this. Strangely enough I think the time before the race is what I enjoy the most.

The nerves, anticipation, excitement. You can sense the tension and energy in everyone around you. I just love that pre-race buzz.

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On 13/02/2019 at 7:53 AM, more said:

Lol true, I normally don't get nervous until I stand around seeing everyone else nervous which makes me nervous..

So I think Im all set, pushy is in getting a service tomorrow, have all my gells, race belt, hydration etc sorted. For the bike I'm planning on have my shoes in with the rubber bands so I can run to the mount line but instead of risking a flying mount I'm going to then stop and mount normally-sound like a good idea?

Now 'there aint nuthin to it but to do it' :thumbsup:

How did you end up going?>

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35 minutes ago, zed said:

How did you end up going?>

Awesome mate. Came in a smidge under 6 hours which I was happy with. It was quite a tough day in that it was pretty hot-around 32 degrees by memory, but I had a ball. Could hardly walk for the next couple of days though lol.

Backed it up with Challange St Kilda a couple of months later and did a 5:25 and felt heaps better and pulled up a lot better-was ready for training the next day bar a sort foot.

So now its back into training mode and trying to plan my next one-I'm think Moololabar in September?

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59 minutes ago, more said:

Awesome mate. Came in a smidge under 6 hours which I was happy with. It was quite a tough day in that it was pretty hot-around 32 degrees by memory, but I had a ball. Could hardly walk for the next couple of days though lol.

Backed it up with Challange St Kilda a couple of months later and did a 5:25 and felt heaps better and pulled up a lot better-was ready for training the next day bar a sort foot.

So now its back into training mode and trying to plan my next one-I'm think Moololabar in September?

cool well done :)

I've got that one on my radar too.

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On 11/01/2019 at 9:55 AM, Peter said:

I always do.  Stand 60 out of T1 and watch all the bike crashes from retards trying to put their feet in their shoes.  

Train for 5 months. Crash at the start of the bike. = dumb. 

Was watching the pros nearly crash mounting/dismounting in this GTN vid and reminded me of this comment....crazy how many nearly eat it!

 

 

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6 hours ago, more said:

Was watching the pros nearly crash mounting/dismounting in this GTN vid and reminded me of this comment....crazy how many nearly eat it!

 

 

I can't believe these people are Pro's.

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27 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I can't believe these people are Pro's.

It was pretty funny. I've only tried it once, decided on race morning it looked like a good idea, then promptly rode straight into the kerb on the exit of T1  (Star City Tri) :blush:

One thing, when he was timing the fast mounts, it didn't take into account the slowing down later to get feet in/ do up shoes.  He did address it later but i wonder how much time you lose later on?

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On 08/01/2019 at 5:13 PM, more said:

So I have my first 70.3 in a few weeks in Geelong. As a complete newb Id appreciate any advice anyone has to share. From what I gather in the other thread I should draft and pee on the bike..... what else?

Nutrition-any good websites or ballpark recommendations?

Gear-my heart rate monitor isn't water proof. Do you bother putting it on after the swim, not sure I can be arsed?

Socks on the bike-just personal preference?

Weird things I wouldn't have experienced (besides guys peeing on the bike)

Any other hints or tips for a guy who has only done a few sprints? 

I would get in contact with The Customer. She used to live in Geelong & is very knowledgeable in all things tri related. She has raced Kona. 

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13 minutes ago, FatPom said:

One thing, when he was timing the fast mounts, it didn't take into account the slowing down later to get feet in/ do up shoes.  He did address it later but i wonder how much time you lose later on?

You get up to race pace then pop your first foot in the shoe. Takes 2 or 3 seconds, you drop 1 or 2kph. Back up to race pace, then the next foot. Compared to being stationery in transition while putting your shoes on and then having to run through transition in bike shoes. We have a couple of fast triathletes in our club who still put their bike shoes on and off in transition - they loose well over a minute to the rest of us in transition every race.

A bit disappointing when you see some of the pros who obviously don't practice this skill.  Rule number one - keep looking straight ahead. If you have to look down, glance down and then continue looking ahead. Exactly the same for when grabbing and returning your bidon.

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24 minutes ago, Rob said:

. We have a couple of fast triathletes in our club who still put their bike shoes on and off in transition - they loose well over a minute to the rest of us in transition every race.

If u lose a minute you're doing something wrong. 

Yeah putting feet in shoes whilst moving may lose less time if u do it right. 

But in my n=1 I've lost more time doing feet in shoes on the  bike.than feet in shoes and running in transition..

And caught people who did the bike thing. 

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It's a basic skill any pro should learn. For 5 years my bike shoes were screwed to my pedals. Every ride I did I put my feet in the shoes on the bike. You learn to do it without looking down. Even recently (I'm rich enough to own a pair of Keo's these days) I left the shoes in the pedals at home & at work. It's a skill that stays once you have it.

These guys are paid to win races. I can't believe they haven't practiced this to the point it becomes second nature. It's the kind of training you can do when you are having a rest day.

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25 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

It's a basic skill any pro should learn. For 5 years my bike shoes were screwed to my pedals. Every ride I did I put my feet in the shoes on the bike. You learn to do it without looking down. Even recently (I'm rich enough to own a pair of Keo's these days) I left the shoes in the pedals at home & at work. It's a skill that stays once you have it.

These guys are paid to win races. I can't believe they haven't practiced this to the point it becomes second nature. It's the kind of training you can do when you are having a rest day.

Oh yeah, pros should have it nailed, given the dynamics of their races and commitment to the sport.

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2 hours ago, Rob said:

You get up to race pace then pop your first foot in the shoe. Takes 2 or 3 seconds, you drop 1 or 2kph. Back up to race pace, then the next foot. Compared to being stationery in transition while putting your shoes on and then having to run through transition in bike shoes. We have a couple of fast triathletes in our club who still put their bike shoes on and off in transition - they loose well over a minute to the rest of us in transition every race.

A bit disappointing when you see some of the pros who obviously don't practice this skill.  Rule number one - keep looking straight ahead. If you have to look down, glance down and then continue looking ahead. Exactly the same for when grabbing and returning your bidon.

That wasn't the comparison I was making (or what he was talking about in the vid).  I'm talking about the difference between taking a couple secs longer after the mount and doing your shoes up vs making a  faster getaway and slowing up again down the road.

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What I've found that if you get up to speed with your feet onto top of shoes its easier to keep the bike going straight. At low speed trying to get your feet in causes the bike to wobble over the road more plus there are always more people near the mount line.

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We all know the idea is to get up to speed, latch in behind someone & put your feet in your shoes once you're tucked nicely in and riding in the slipstream. :)

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8 hours ago, Limited said:

What I've found that if you get up to speed with your feet onto top of shoes its easier to keep the bike going straight. At low speed trying to get your feet in causes the bike to wobble over the road more plus there are always more people near the mount line.

Exactly. Depending on turns and traffic just out of T1, I can be 500m down the road before I've got my feet in my shoes.

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1 hour ago, bRace said:

Exactly. Depending on turns and traffic just out of T1, I can be 500m down the road before I've got my feet in my shoes.

And preferably on a slight downhill.

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