Jump to content
more

Advice for first 70.3

Recommended Posts

11 hours ago, BNothling said:

I've always explained to people that I work with that their nerves are their body's way of being prepared for something extraordinary that they are about to accomplish. Essentially, if they aren't nervous, they either aren't mentally prepared for it or aren't giving the event enough credit.

Feel the nerves, acknowledge them, appreciate their presence and tear shit up.

If I don't have 3 nervous shits pre-race, I know my heart is not in it.

Luckily my Geelong accomodation is close to the course, so I won't have to worry about lining up at the port-a-loos

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/02/2019 at 8:17 AM, BNothling said:

I've always explained to people that I work with that their nerves are their body's way of being prepared for something extraordinary that they are about to accomplish. Essentially, if they aren't nervous, they either aren't mentally prepared for it or aren't giving the event enough credit.

Feel the nerves, acknowledge them, appreciate their presence and tear shit up.

I'm not nervous at all before races. I've obviously never been mentally prepared. Nor given an event due credit.

Although, I most definitely get excited.

I was even excited last Sunday about racing 8 km at Masters Athletics. Perhaps if I was nervous as well as excited, I would have run a bit quicker. I'm not sure how though, I was running the last 2 km at puke-threshold pace while desperately trying to shake off the three other guys whom I'd been battling since before halfway.

I go into a race either confident of my preparation to deliver the best I can, or (more commonly these days) if undertrained, at least comfortable with my ability to pull through and enjoy whatever challenges the day presents. Either way I'm excited and appreciative to be there on race morning, feeling happy and relaxed.

All positive emotions. No place for nerves. Just out there enjoying my racing.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul I'll suggest you make up the smallest percentage of the field.  That's ok, and so is what the other 99% of us feel on the start line.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Possibly Paul, what you call excitement, a lot of others call nerves.

Possibly for some. Although over the years, I have seen many genuinely nervous people before races.

Those whose nerves limit the frequency, distance or size of the races they choose.

Scott Tinley wrote an insightful piece about pre-race nerves way back in the day. Unfortunately google isn't helping me find it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst I totally get the nerves thing, I must say I am more like Paul in that I get excited, not so much nervous before the race. I know if I have put the work in or not, and by race race day its too late to start worrying about it then.

I do get a little nervous however about whether I will get time for 3 toilet visits prior 😂. Once that is done I am all good.

Cheers

NSF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not so nervous about the race, what will be will be, but am VERY nervous about the swim having been in such an environment before.

Hopefully I can just start at the back and not get in to many people's way.

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, more said:

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

Done by age group, Start times are listed on page 19 of the AIG - http://www.velothon.com/~/media/8e8816707f8f4a11836f7377aba46f16/as im70 3geeaig 05feb19v1.pdf

If you look at the athlete list, you will be able to work out how many in your wave, and approx how many will swim over you (not many for me, only wave behind mine is the teams wave)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, more said:

I'm not so nervous about the race, what will be will be, but am VERY nervous about the swim having been in such an environment before.

Hopefully I can just start at the back and not get in to many people's way.

So with this in mind what's the go with the wave starts? They don't explain it anywhere in the guide book. Are the waves by age group or expected swim time?

Hi mate,

I wouldn't be too worried as the waves are not that big and given the few minutes between each wave everyone spreads out a bit and the water clarity allows faster swimmers to see you before swimming over you. Just get in there and hold your line and you should be ok.

Also the current assistance really benefits slower swimmers more than faster (IMO) so the time differences are not as great.

Good luck with your race.

NSF

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@more the wave starts are no bigger than the wstc events.  You'll be fine.

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cape_Horn said:

Done by age group, Start times are listed on page 19 of the AIG - http://www.velothon.com/~/media/8e8816707f8f4a11836f7377aba46f16/as im70 3geeaig 05feb19v1.pdf

If you look at the athlete list, you will be able to work out how many in your wave, and approx how many will swim over you (not many for me, only wave behind mine is the teams wave)

Hmm ok so I have  the M 35-39 and the teams behind me. Don't swim over me Horn ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Notsofast said:

Hi mate,

I wouldn't be too worried as the waves are not that big and given the few minutes between each wave everyone spreads out a bit and the water clarity allows faster swimmers to see you before swimming over you. Just get in there and hold your line and you should be ok.

Also the current assistance really benefits slower swimmers more than faster (IMO) so the time differences are not as great.

Good luck with your race.

NSF

 

Cheers mate!!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Peter said:

@more the wave starts are no bigger than the wstc events.  You'll be fine.

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

Lol true, I normally don't get nervous until I stand around seeing everyone else nervous which makes me nervous..

So I think Im all set, pushy is in getting a service tomorrow, have all my gells, race belt, hydration etc sorted. For the bike I'm planning on have my shoes in with the rubber bands so I can run to the mount line but instead of risking a flying mount I'm going to then stop and mount normally-sound like a good idea?

Now 'there aint nuthin to it but to do it' :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, more said:

Lol true, I normally don't get nervous until I stand around seeing everyone else nervous which makes me nervous..

So I think Im all set, pushy is in getting a service tomorrow, have all my gells, race belt, hydration etc sorted. For the bike I'm planning on have my shoes in with the rubber bands so I can run to the mount line but instead of risking a flying mount I'm going to then stop and mount normally-sound like a good idea?

Now 'there aint nuthin to it but to do it' :thumbsup:

For a 70.3, this is exactly what I do. Safer than running X distance in cycling shoes, but still relatively conservative. I'd rather take the extra 5s to get going over the course of 5:30 and know that I'm not going to ruin my race trying to flying mount.

Also my 2c regarding the swim, you'll find that pretty much everyone except the gun swimmers are just trying to get in and get out with the minimal amount of fuss and so it's nowhere near as frantic as a shorter distance race. I've found that everyone gives everyone heaps of room and it's quite easy to find your own space in the water and do your own thing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/01/2019 at 12:18 PM, zed said:

Perhaps if you are mal-coordinated it could be perceived as being dangerous..

Check how many people are still pissing around 200m up the road trying to get their feet in their shoes... and not just noobs.

I resemble that comment.🤣  I start with the shoes clipped onto the pedals.  I don't want to be running around on uneven surface in cleats, the risk to roll an ankle is there and very real (and seriously after training for a half or full, what a waste it would be).  Most accidents happen outside of T1 with people trying to clip in at low speeds, wobbling around in amongst a bunch of others doing the same thing. 

I can no longer jump on the moving bike (especially with the biddons behind the seat......just not that flexible any more)  So I get past the mount line away from others, lean bike over, swing leg over and then start to peddle up to speed.  Once at speed, in goes the 1st foot, peddle back up to speed, put in 2nd foot and then back up to speed.  This generally keeps me well clear of all others and there is no way that I'm within 400m of the mount line at this point.   

If you can do this in 100 metres I'm guessing your HR just went through the roof and this is not a sprint race no need to spike the HR.

With Geelong having the big U turn just before you head up the hill, its best to be clipped in and settled prior to that turn, so for different courses there can be a different approach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Peter said:

 

I always dread the start but as soon as that first swim stroke happens, I'm all good and loving it.

Its just that point between waking up and the gun I dislike.

I've been thinking about this. Strangely enough I think the time before the race is what I enjoy the most.

The nerves, anticipation, excitement. You can sense the tension and energy in everyone around you. I just love that pre-race buzz.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×