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Advice for first 70.3

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Soooooo general consensus is now to wear my bike shoes from T1 (and therefore I guess also my socks) and stop, mount and ride off into the sunset?

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Other point of Geelong, is straight over the mountline, you have a 200-300m drag on the flat, and then a left uturn before climbing at 5ish% for twice that distance. So if you don't get the feet in before you turn, your climbing will be impacted. So if you don't practice a flying mount and making sure you can cinch down the shoes properly, (noting that there are others around all weaving about when they are trying to do the same thing) it might not be faster anyway (at least when you exit around the time I do and it seems five wide at that point.)

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21 minutes ago, more said:

Soooooo general consensus is now to wear my bike shoes from T1 (and therefore I guess also my socks) and stop, mount and ride off into the sunset?

How do you ride in training? Do that. 

May want to get some more swim training in if you're riding off into a sunset tho ;)

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Yes I have seen plenty of crashes at or near the mount line. But the athletes with their shoes already on seem to have just as many problems (sometimes more) trying to clip in (especially when their cleats are now full of dirt). The main issue with your shoes attached is making sure you do not start pedaling with a shoe hanging upside down.

There are skills worth learning and you would be surprised how quick it is to become proficient. Some people have trouble grabbing their water bottle while riding. I know athletes who stopped on the bike every time they had to eat or drink in an Ironman.

If you leave your shoes attached to the bike, you do NOT need to do a flying mount. You can simply push off from a standing start with one foot on top of the shoe and swing the other leg other. The shoe on the 'other' foot needs to be flipped over (on top of the pedal) before you start pedaling.

Also, depending on the size of transition, I would suggest the advantage of shoes attached to the bike is well over a minute. Based on comparing my transition times to other athletes who run in their bike shoes.

Skills in general are often neglected by Triathletes. Pretty much every bike course has u-turns (often fairly tight ones). How many people practice cornering? How many practice FAST transitions in their brick sessions, taking off their wetsuits quickly, mount and dismounts, staying outside the draft zone, descending, sighting in open water, porpoising, beach starts, deep water starts, swimming around buoys, drafting in the swim? These are just the very basic skills before you get more advanced with track stands, bunny hops, riding no hands, bumping handlebars, leaning on other riders, tumble turns, dive starts, etc. They would rather spend $3,000 on a wheel upgrade that promises a 40 sec advantage over 180km.

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2 hours ago, Rob said:

Yes I have seen plenty of crashes at or near the mount line. But the athletes with their shoes already on seem to have just as many problems (sometimes more) trying to clip in (especially when their cleats are now full of dirt). The main issue with your shoes attached is making sure you do not start pedaling with a shoe hanging upside down.

There are skills worth learning and you would be surprised how quick it is to become proficient. Some people have trouble grabbing their water bottle while riding. I know athletes who stopped on the bike every time they had to eat or drink in an Ironman.

If you leave your shoes attached to the bike, you do NOT need to do a flying mount. You can simply push off from a standing start with one foot on top of the shoe and swing the other leg other. The shoe on the 'other' foot needs to be flipped over (on top of the pedal) before you start pedaling.

Also, depending on the size of transition, I would suggest the advantage of shoes attached to the bike is well over a minute. Based on comparing my transition times to other athletes who run in their bike shoes.

Skills in general are often neglected by Triathletes. Pretty much every bike course has u-turns (often fairly tight ones). How many people practice cornering? How many practice FAST transitions in their brick sessions, taking off their wetsuits quickly, mount and dismounts, staying outside the draft zone, descending, sighting in open water, porpoising, beach starts, deep water starts, swimming around buoys, drafting in the swim? These are just the very basic skills before you get more advanced with track stands, bunny hops, riding no hands, bumping handlebars, leaning on other riders, tumble turns, dive starts, etc. They would rather spend $3,000 on a wheel upgrade that promises a 40 sec advantage over 180km.

I can understand why someone would prefer to spend some money on a shiny new cool looking toy that makes them faster rather then spend hours focusing on how to take a wetsuit off, perform a U turn, mount and unmount etc 😉 

I am however unaware of why you would be tumble turning, bunny hopping or leaning on other riders in a triathlon 😮

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10 minutes ago, dazaau said:

 

I am however unaware of why you would be tumble turning, bunny hopping or leaning on other riders in a triathlon 😮

That’s why you don’t win.  They can’t beat you if you take them out.

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1 hour ago, dazaau said:

I am however unaware of why you would be tumble turning, bunny hopping or leaning on other riders in a triathlon 😮

I listed these as 'advanced' skills.

If you want to do swim squads with faster swimmers, you will need to tumble turn. Otherwise you will be too slow off the wall and hold others up. Plus tumble turning will result in a better quality swim session.

If you want to join fast bunch rides, you need to be able handle the occasional bump. Putting your hand on another rider's shoulder while you look behind helps you hold a straight line while you look back. I have read many on this forum say you should do all your training rides without drafting because that's how we race, but I very much disagree. There is a mid week ride I join which is by far the hardest ride of the week. I have to turn myself inside out just to hang on.  I simply cannot replicate this effort when riding solo (maybe others are better than me at this).

I have Bunny hopped more obstacles than I care to remember. I learnt this skill as a teenager on a BMX. But it has saved me so many times. Especially if riding in a pack when someone else 'less skilled' puts you in an awkward situation.

Again, I mentioned these as more advanced skills, but would still recommend learning them.  None of them are difficult

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4 hours ago, Rob said:

I listed these as 'advanced' skills.

If you want to do swim squads with faster swimmers, you will need to tumble turn. Otherwise you will be too slow off the wall and hold others up. Plus tumble turning will result in a better quality swim session.

If you want to join fast bunch rides, you need to be able handle the occasional bump. Putting your hand on another rider's shoulder while you look behind helps you hold a straight line while you look back. I have read many on this forum say you should do all your training rides without drafting because that's how we race, but I very much disagree. There is a mid week ride I join which is by far the hardest ride of the week. I have to turn myself inside out just to hang on.  I simply cannot replicate this effort when riding solo (maybe others are better than me at this).

I have Bunny hopped more obstacles than I care to remember. I learnt this skill as a teenager on a BMX. But it has saved me so many times. Especially if riding in a pack when someone else 'less skilled' puts you in an awkward situation.

Again, I mentioned these as more advanced skills, but would still recommend learning them.  None of them are difficult

It's also called FREE SPEED! THIS COSTS NOTHING.

Having been in the sport for 30-odd years and seen and experienced lots, it never ceases to amaze me how many people make simple errors from not having trained for the basics, let alone the advanced skills. Things like (at race pace): -

- Swim sighting - positioning yourself to void the melee / swimming the shortest possible route / drafting / pacing;

- Nutrition - pre-race / eating and drinking on the bike and run / gathering up bottles;

- Transitions - assembling and arranging gear in the zone / walking the transition zone / the routine of transition (wetsuits off etc) / feet in or feet out / wearing shoes or not;

- Bike handling skills - cornering / braking / climbing / descending / U-turns;

- Equipment maintenance - how to make your gear (whatever you've spent) last and safe / ensure it works on race day and training

- Run technique - running the apexes / the crests / drafting.

These are the things that, together, mount up to some serious time and will give a serious psych boost along the way.

Luck is where Preparation meets Opportunity!

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On 08/01/2019 at 5:13 PM, more said:

So I have my first 70.3 in a few weeks in Geelong. As a complete newb Id appreciate any advice anyone has to share. From what I gather in the other thread I should draft and pee on the bike..... what else?

Nutrition-any good websites or ballpark recommendations?

Gear-my heart rate monitor isn't water proof. Do you bother putting it on after the swim, not sure I can be arsed?

Socks on the bike-just personal preference?

Weird things I wouldn't have experienced (besides guys peeing on the bike)

Any other hints or tips for a guy who has only done a few sprints? 

Remember to take some time and look around ,soak it up a little you'll never do another first 70.3 again. See You Out There.

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On 12/01/2019 at 9:51 AM, TThomo said:

Remember to take some time and look around ,soak it up a little you'll never do another first 70.3 again.

Unless you DNF. :(

Edited by Paul Every

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On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 5:17 PM, dazaau said:

 

I am however unaware of why you would be ... bunny hopping ... in a triathlon 😮

I'm guessing you've never done a Warringah tri club race at North Head...

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On 11/01/2019 at 5:17 PM, dazaau said:

... unaware of why you would be ... bunny hopping ... in a triathlon 😮

You're approaching to overtake the rider in front when they drop their water bottle which starts rolling into your path.

You could swerve, but you might misjudge the direction of the water bottle and hit it anyway, or worse take out another rider who was just starting to pass you.

Or you could hold your line and bunny hop over it.  No chance of hitting the water bottle, no chance of taking out another competitor. Unless of course you have never practiced a bunny hop and don't know how to do them.

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1 hour ago, Rob said:

Or you could hold your line and bunny hop over it.  No chance of hitting the water bottle, no chance of taking out another competitor.

*Thread crossover* and you might just catch out the guy drafting behind you as he didn't see the bottle coming!

But realistically, for someone's first 70.3, I'm not sure bunny hopping, shoes on the bike etc etc are the greatest 'bang for buck' training hours. 

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9 minutes ago, xblane said:

But realistically, for someone's first 70.3, I'm not sure bunny hopping, shoes on the bike etc etc are the greatest 'bang for buck' training hours. 

Agree. In one of my earlier posts I listed it under 'advanced' skills.  Sorry for taking the thread off topic.

Off topic again: I had done around 50 Triathlons and Duathlons before I did my first Half Ironman. First 5 races I wore runners on flat pedals. Bought my first 'good' bike with clipless pedals on a Saturday. That afternoon rode it to a carpark to practice shoes attached to bike and raced that way the next morning. Some of these skills are very easy to learn (although it definitely helps if you have Tri shoes rather than road shoes).

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I ran a drink station at Geelong and agree with what was said above about slowing down to get drinks.   You won't believe the number of people who flew through and had drinks flying everywhere trying to grab them. 

 

I've finished one Half IM.   Learn the time cut offs,  because I got the bike cut off wrong and fanged it, not leaving a lot in the tank for the run.   

 

As for the run - that said, if you start the run, I think you stand a good chance of finishing because there's no damn way after completing the first two legs you want to pull out.   I walked a fair chunk of it, slowest half marathon of my life, and I didn't care.   

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