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Flanman

Naturally Gifted vs....

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This morning I travelled from the City to the Central Coast. Traffic was terrible and took three hours. I called into Maccas for a drink. I was wearing a Forster Challenge T-shirt. 

Anyway, this guy came up to me and started talking about Tris (he lived in Forster for a while). He was real friendly and asked about me doing Tris. I said that this was my 30 th year then he told me....

He did Port IM as his second only tri and KQ for Kona (30-34 AG) He loved Kona. BASTARD !!!

That got me thinking (apart from his second tri being an IM).  How people are naturally gifted and how many sports would this relate to ? How many waste or utilise their natural ability? How many are not genetically gifted but are  totally committed and become extremely good ?

your thoughts?

FM

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Anthony Goebert x 1000, unparalleled natural talent and a bigger waste of it I’m yet to see. Complete and utter twat. 

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The guy you are talking with has been involved in endurance sport since a young pup, he raced the Nutri grain Ironman series and has a huge engine, an aerobic base that’s been built over 20 plus years.

 I guess what I’m saying is it’s not always “naturally gifted” sometimes there is more to the story.  

Triathlon is not a sport which needs a massive amount of coordination so I think close to anyone can commit and become decent (unlike say golf or tennis etc) 

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I consider myself 'gifted' in that I can pick up anything pretty easily. Where I'm not gifted is in endurance and frankly I don't have the motivation to pursue it. This suits me as I like to try a bunch of different things and not just do long, boring hours of the same stuff over and over. I swam yesterday, rock climbing today, touch football tomorrow and a surf on Tuesday.

I know plenty of people who have way better engines than me but no skills or adaptability.

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I've never met anyone gifted who didn't also have a desire and the patience to work hard over a long period of time.  Some cross-over from one thing to another easier than others.

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There was a guy here he was in the kayaks at Barcelona Olympics.  Took to triathlon fairly easily.

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I work my arse off to be mid pack. 

It always hurts to see people around you whoquite obviously are ‘winging it’ knowing how’s much hard work you have have put in. Running races really hit home, when you have trained, have a proper nutrition and pack go g strategy based off data, and you are pacing with people wearing Kmart gear😂 I’m never going to podium anything, but I really enjoy getting a bit better step by step. 

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Ricky Carmichael. Arguably the best motocross rider of ALL time. 

 

Special mix of natural talent and drive/hard work. 

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I had a friend at school who had done absolutely no athletics training of any sort, and when his parents split up in year 9, he took up running for something to do to help him get through it. 8 weeks later, he won the inter-school 1500m - running 4.28 in u/15's. 

He ended up turning to triathlon for something different in the late 90's, winning his age group in plenty of races & went to the worlds. If he started swimming as a kid, I think he would have struggled to get to Olympic level for AUS, but I've no doubt that he would have gone pretty close to making the Olympics for his parents' birth nation.

The first time I raced him in triathlon - his first ever tri - we got off the bike together, and I didn't see him till after the race, where he lamented how bad his (17 minute) 5k was.... bastard!!

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Most of the magic genetic talent stories, gloss over the background in another sport before they cross over. Teenage years are magic for rapid adaptation and performance leaps.

40 somethings are not likely to discover any hidden genetic talent and find rapid adaptation. They needed to do this when the were 15.

 

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17 hours ago, Flanman said:

My freaking brother , decided to play cricket and gets captain and opens batting and bowling, decides to play footy gets captain best and fairest and plays firsts when he is 16, decides to play golf and wins the first tournament he enters, gets ask to train with AFL clubs but Knocks them back so he can study and becomes an uber successful business man.

If he decided to do tri no doubt he would Kona qualify first attempt...FFS lol 

 

Edited by more

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One of the guys at my school had NSW cricket and soccer fighting over him. 

Then his son turns out to be Socceroo Mark Milligan 

theres some genetics for you. 

My life has been a triumph of mediocrity. There is not much I have tried that I can’t do but I struggle to get above mid pack at any of them. 

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Not a simple topic but without the genetics or DNA for what you are doing whether a sport like tri, or a more “free” sport like say tennis, or football that rely on co ordination, you will never amount to “champion”. 

Tri gets lost with the age group thing as well, huge gap between being Craig Alexander at his peak and an age group champ at Gundy or Club Champs  or something.  Then with tri you also have different distance and many have very different results based on those.

Greg Norman summed it up best for me, blessed with the skill to hit a golf ball and also blessed with the ability to do it over and over again.... genetically gifted in not just the skill but the willingness to repeat and repeat whereas so many people have short attention spans and simply can’t do that. 

Maybe the best way of looking at it is, without the genetics you simply won’t achieve the highest level.  Why did Crowie, Macca, Welch and Jacobs  get there at Kona when all other Australians have failed... probably some luck at some point too as I’m  sure as Hell it wasn’t just dreaming and it comes true.

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16 hours ago, Bored@work said:

John Daly 

His son is a mini version of him and he won a golf tournament last week. Looked to be about 13. 

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56 minutes ago, Peter said:

His son is a mini version of him and he won a golf tournament last week. Looked to be about 13. 

Read his book. It's worth it

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On 28 December 2018 at 11:54 PM, FatPom said:

Anthony Goebert x 1000, unparalleled natural talent and a bigger waste of it I’m yet to see. Complete and utter twat. 

Spot on. Sport is littered with such examples. 

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2 hours ago, Greyman said:

Spot on. Sport is littered with such examples. 

BIt that’s the point, you have to have the genetics to succeed. It then becomes wether you throw it away or not and the brain to rote learn, time and time again.  But if you don’t have them, you are not getting that choice. Four Australian males have achieved the dizzy heights of our sport..... that’s very little success and one hell of a lot of failure in a country that prides itself on sporting prowess. 

Discipline and drive are king, you need to be gifted but have a brain that enables you to do  the same  thing day in/ day out without getting bored as told to me by G Norman through a TV screen. 

Rare breed stuff and three cheers to anyone that can do it. 

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Oompa Loompa said:

Four Australian males have achieved the dizzy heights of our sport..... that’s very little success and one hell of a lot of failure in a country that prides itself on sporting prowess. 

That's nearly 20% of all winners. For a country that has less than 1% of the world's population, and probably less than 10% of the world's triathletes, I don't think it's too bad.

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15 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

That's nearly 20% of all winners. For a country that has less than 1% of the world's population, and probably less than 10% of the world's triathletes, I don't think it's too bad.

Yes, it’s very good when you look at that way and you can carve it other ways to make it look better again, ie just credit multi winners as a Kona champ then suddenly those four are equals of Scott and Allen. Flii it over though to all of sport, even pre it’s membership decline in this country in recent times, it becomes woeful, a bit like that person that has one bet a year on the Melbourne cup at 100 to one,  yeah, they can win but have no hope..... except for 1948 and Ray Neville on Rimfire. Lol. 

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Talent = Gift * Sweat

 

Edit to add:

Olympics / Piano / PHD / gardening etc etc

Edited by trifun

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2 hours ago, trifun said:

Talent = Gift * Sweat

One factor I have identified that separates the athletes who advance fast and those who struggle to reach their potential (this is based on 25yrs of coaching people of all abilities)

It's a two pronged thing, it's the belief in the plan, and the ability to convert directions into action

One of the biggest problems is, people think they have that ability, but many don't. They either don't believe in the plan with enough conviction, or they unconsciously modify the simple directions and never get the outcome they seek. 

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11 hours ago, trifun said:

Talent = Gift * Sweat

This.

In our sport, you'll never find a champion without bucket loads of natural talent, and you'll never find a champion that doesn't put in the type of work that would make most of us roll our eyes back and pray for salvation.

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On 31/12/2018 at 2:13 PM, AP said:

One factor I have identified that separates the athletes who advance fast and those who struggle to reach their potential (this is based on 25yrs of coaching people of all abilities)

It's a two pronged thing, it's the belief in the plan, and the ability to convert directions into action

One of the biggest problems is, people think they have that ability, but many don't. They either don't believe in the plan with enough conviction, or they unconsciously modify the simple directions and never get the outcome they seek. 

Yes, directions are important but the coach also needs to put themselves in the customers shoes rather than their own to communicate. I'm a natural listener and I can remember working with one swim coach that simply couldn't explain what he was asking which was basically get your finger tips closer to  your ears on your stroke as you come through, had a fill in coach for a day (that had coached elite swim squads) and had in down pat in 4 seconds when then they simply said that, rather then move your left hand left or other various ways of saying "get your hands closer to your ears"....   10 seconds quicker after a  4 second chat in between 100 efforts, that was a month to get too and only made available by the substitute teacher...... 

just all in the communication skill, the ability to explain direction so the audience/ customer understands.

 

 

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On 05/01/2019 at 8:33 AM, Oompa Loompa said:

just all in the communication skill, the ability to explain direction so the audience/ customer understands.

 

 

That really hits it on the head - you have to give 3-4 different explanations to get the same message across - it's all about communication 

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