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Stuie016

Training Question

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This is a bit of a long winded question around training.  I know there is the ‘What training you did today’ thread but I was wondering what the broader picture of training is for the ‘average’ triathlete here.

I am listening to podcasts in my daily transit to work which has been enlightening, but they all seem to be weighted towards the front of pack, Kona qualifying age grouper which is most certainly what I am not and will never be.  So any advice garnered from these is not overly relevant to my situation

I am working towards Busso 70.3 in May, with the main goal of finishing within cut-off as it will be my first attempt at the distance, but having a few extra goals which will be dependent on my progress through training.  I am planning on doing a few sprints and an Olympic beforehand.

I guess I should get to my question, how do you all fit in/structure your training around work, partners, children for this distance?  Is it really a case of 4:30am sessions on the trainer and runs or is this more for the front of pack championship qualifying competitor.  I understand that this sport can be a lonely selfish one at times but with me and my wife working full time with 3 children I really need to be weary of not putting pressures on the better half and ruin the experience.

I am obviously a member of a club but not getting home from work before 6pm makes it difficult to get to club training sessions so it will need to be solo efforts, which isn’t an issue as with the right goals I no hesitation to push myself.

Hopefully I don’t come across as a complete numpity to you all, but thought I would at least put it out there as there seems to be quite the broad spectrum of competitors here and hopefully I can get some form of clarity/direction.

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There’ll be people more qualified than me to answer this, but its a hard thing to answer as it depends on your background, is there a discipline you are better at already, how much time can you realistically allocate towards training, etc.

In terms of juggling the various commitments, its a matter of getting done what you can, when you can (eg when kids are asleep). But that’s just what works for me - not much more to it than that. If you’re committed to your goal you’ll find a way to make it work.

Only other thing I can add is a coach is valuable even if training solo, be consistent and have a good diet.

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G'day Stuie

Im no where near qualified to answer but i'll fill you in on roughly how i manage.

I work Mon-Fri and am at work just after 5 am and dont get home until 17-30, I cannot train during work hours as im on a gas plant as a contractor.  2 kids primary school aged at home and wife.

For my recent IMWA build i managed between 12-18 hrs a week training.  99% of the time i train in the evening because getting up at 2 am to train during the week is just not sustainable for me.  

My week look something like this training wise

2-3 swims a week, generally Mon / wed / Fri evenings, closer to race week we dropped the Mon session and did bigger sessions the next day, approx 8-12 km per week.

Would run on Tue / Thurs evening after kids in bed and Sunday long run in the am which would generally be off the bike

Tuesday and Thurs would also be bike days but this would be structured session on the bike

Saturday long ride by myself 99% of time with most rides having a run off bike, Saturday long rides i would generally leave home approx 0230 - 3 am for the 4 hr and longer rides so i could be finished and home for kids sports, i think i left home at 0100 once.

Mondays were mostly rest or strength which i could do at home over the road at the gym.  

My wife would have my dinner ready when i came home after training, i would always train after the kids have eaten and gone to bed so i could still have time to sit and read with them, help with homework etc, but it was a tight schedule.  i got no where near enough sleep, not even close to the 7-8 hrs people here say they get and yes i was tired.  i would sneak in naps (1 hr) on Saturday after kids sport and Sunday lunch times, but was super conscious of still being dad and family man. 

Oh I always did the dishes and clean up the kitchen, do washing and folding and would ensure the rooms in all the house we clean and yard mowed and tidy so that i didn't get yelled out for not doing other things.

My wife will say during each race build that it sucks and takes so much time etc, but then she will turn around and say things like, im glad you do this, its better than drinking and pissing away your life, it sets a good example for kids to set goals and chase things they want. and shes always very proud of me at the finish line, but is happy to have me back full time for a while afterwards.  

We are currently having a rest for a month or so now and its great.  I only race twice a year maximum due to where we live making it not practical.

Good luck in busso, i was going to be there but the next goal i have is port mac that same weekend at this stage.

Kieran

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Great reply Kieran.

It is my belief that in a situation like yours, it’s important to have a realistic sit down and work out where your priorities lie. I would fairly safely assume that time with your family and keeping them well looked after is number one.

My perception on this has changed a lot since being a single uni student living at home to now living with my partner, having a dog and trying to ensure we have some steady money coming in. This is only a fraction of the responsibility that someone like yourself has, so it’s easy to understand how it is tough!

The crux of it all is that the process of training has to be enjoyable. This doesn’t mean every single session has you jumping out of your skin but if the overarching feeling towards training is that it’s a burden, it will be tough.

As has been mentioned on here, I think this is where a coach can aid in changing the week on a micro basis as things pop up in order to chase the long term goal and keep consistency. 

70.3 doesn’t require ridiculous hours, just consistency.

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1 hour ago, Stuie016 said:

I am working towards Busso 70.3 in May, with the main goal of finishing within cut-off 

Quote
23 minutes ago, lachie94 said:

70.3 doesn’t require ridiculous hours, just consistency.

 

Most people can get up at 5am and get in a good training session (except Kieran who works crazy early apparently) without missing too much on the home front. I find it's better to do that and be back for breakfast with the kids and leave evenings available to help with the arsenic hour in the lead up to kids bedtime.

I sort of followed a cookie cutter internet program for 2 x cairns 70.3s and went great (for me). You're not going to win but you'll be fit, healthy and keeping in good with the wife because it's not massive hours. https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/kpdocshare/Training_Plans/Your_Best_Ever_703.pdf

 

Edited by Gundy
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Thanks for the replies.

This is along the lines of what I was after in regards to advice.  I am currently just trying to get into a habit of doing something most days and then once that is set take the next step of more structure.  The club does do a training plan which starts around 12-16 weeks out which their sessions are based on but as it is posted you can follow along solo.

I kind of knew that 4:30-5am sessions would need to be the go but getting the mind fully convinced is the tough part, almost there.

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It sounds like you've got the first key to the puzzle sorted.  Make your goals fit the context of your existing life.  Don't set yourself up for failure (either with the sport or other areas of your life) by being too ambitious, especially when it's your first and you have no idea what might be involved to achieve them.

Keeping the relationship with wife and the kids in a good place should be #1 priority, always.  Make sure that not only are you around but that when you are you're present.

Sounds like you're probably a middle-aged male without existing conditions so the reality is that building up to a 3 hour cycle, 90 minute run (these could even be long ride one week, long run the next) and doing an hour swim session per week would get you to the finish line under cut-off.  Anything more than that is a bonus really.  Most first-timers over-estimate what it takes or get a little excited and lose sight of the fact that their goal is only to finish.  Don't over-complicate it and be patient.  You've got 20 weeks.

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28 minutes ago, lachie94 said:

I would fairly safely assume that time with your family and keeping them well looked after is number one.

 

100% this is why we moved back across the country to the pilbara..so we can be a family and home every day and not FIFO workforce after 15 odd years.

 

10 minutes ago, Gundy said:

Most people can get up at 5am and get in a good training session (except Kieran who works crazy early apparently

i dont think i have ever had a 9-5 job, one day hopefully i can find one that 7 am til 1530, that would be perfect.

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7 minutes ago, Stikman said:

It sounds like you've got the first key to the puzzle sorted.  Make your goals fit the context of your existing life.  Don't set yourself up for failure (either with the sport or other areas of your life) by being too ambitious, especially when it's your first and you have no idea what might be involved to achieve them.

Keeping the relationship with wife and the kids in a good place should be #1 priority, always.  Make sure that not only are you around but that when you are you're present.

Sounds like you're probably a middle-aged male without existing conditions so the reality is that building up to a 3 hour cycle, 90 minute run (these could even be long ride one week, long run the next) and doing an hour swim session per week would get you to the finish line under cut-off.  Anything more than that is a bonus really.  Most first-timers over-estimate what it takes or get a little excited and lose sight of the fact that their goal is only to finish.  Don't over-complicate it and be patient.  You've got 20 weeks.

Spot on there Stickman, 41 without any major physical issues other than being lazy and overweight for the first 35 odd years.  Once consistency is built up planning on doing club group rides on Saturdays once a month to start and something on alternating Sunday mornings as club members seem to do an OWS with longish run after now the weather is better.

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Not sure what your logistics are like with home/work/pool etc but if stretched then combining training on your work commutes can be an efficient way to get training done and get life done..

Door to door, it takes the same time to get to work on a bus or on my bike. A bit longer and I can get a 10-15km run in between home and work. Getting to and from the pool is the biggest sink of time so you need to make sure you make the pool time as useful as possible. or run to pool, swim and then have the family come and meet you for a proper kids swim. 

There are many ways to skin this cat, but invariably one of the following training/work/family/sleep will not be being looked after 100%. As Kieran said, he sacrificed sleep for a while, others will sacrifice work, but a lot will sacrifice family and regret it later on.. I'd sooner miss a session and still have a family and a job 

 

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11 minutes ago, pieman said:

Not sure what your logistics are like with home/work/pool etc but if stretched then combining training on your work commutes can be an efficient way to get training done and get life done..

Door to door, it takes the same time to get to work on a bus or on my bike. A bit longer and I can get a 10-15km run in between home and work. Getting to and from the pool is the biggest sink of time so you need to make sure you make the pool time as useful as possible. or run to pool, swim and then have the family come and meet you for a proper kids swim. 

There are many ways to skin this cat, but invariably one of the following training/work/family/sleep will not be being looked after 100%. As Kieran said, he sacrificed sleep for a while, others will sacrifice work, but a lot will sacrifice family and regret it later on.. I'd sooner miss a session and still have a family and a job 

 

Funny you bring this up, have recently started a new job in the city and looking into logistics of riding into work.  Should take similar time to train commute but would give me a 20km each way cycle.  Just need to work on how to get business shirts and pants to work without too many creases :).

I am fast understanding that training doesn't have to be this high intensity structured event to be effective.  Time running, cycling or swimming is time well spent.

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10 minutes ago, Stuie016 said:

Just need to work on how to get business shirts and pants to work without too many creases :).

I used to roll up 3 or 4 sets and commute on the train once a week with it, then hang them up at work. You can take all the bulky stuff in on that 1 day, then just the essentials when you are on the bike.

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15 minutes ago, Stuie016 said:

Funny you bring this up, have recently started a new job in the city and looking into logistics of riding into work.  Should take similar time to train commute but would give me a 20km each way cycle.  Just need to work on how to get business shirts and pants to work without too many creases :).

I am fast understanding that training doesn't have to be this high intensity structured event to be effective.  Time running, cycling or swimming is time well spent.

Monday morning take 5 shirts/suits in on the train. Friday night take your washing home on the train.

runs are from work to a station the required distance away, or station to home - i used to do this, i preferred the after work to before work

Tuesday ride to work, train/run part way home, wed train to work/ride home etc

If you are time poor, most effective is to train on your own as part of commute if this is possible

Remember this is fun and not a job, and life will get in the way.

A good running backpack will make all the difference as well so you can carry home a dry shirt if you run first. Yes people will look at you funny dripping sweat and trying to do stretches on the train after your run.

Edited by rory-dognz
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Part of me wants to say I resemble this remark.

No where near front of pack, in fact, one race this year, they had packed up the finish line and finish area and had to start the timing computer back up to mark me as a finisher. For long course, I have a 16h+ IM finish and a 7h37m half finish. At my speed it seems to be more a case of surviving and less about raw speed.

As others have said, a lot of this will come down to your initial starting point. How well can you SBR currently? If you can swift better than the average Australian, and ride your bike regularly, then a good brisk walk should just be able to get you in the finish chute under cutoff. Training with others can help, specifically when it comes to motivation, but it isn't required. From a time saving point of view, can you maybe look at commuting via running or riding (or a mix of car and one or the other?). I am somewhat lucky, it takes 25min to drive to work,  35mins on the road bike, 1h25m on a bus or 1h30m at a not horrifically fast pace running. there is also a pool between work and home, so fitting a swim doesn't take me too far out of my way.

Personally I think just going out and doing something often (6-8hours a week of your mix of training) is fine, for those that just need to survive through the race. Don't sweat the small stuff, get out and enjoy yourself, do what you can (and reality, if you can stick most of your training into your commutes, then you have not lost that much time - for instance tomorrow I am hoping to get up a little earlier, and ride the long way to work, 50k instead of 15k)

Oh, and as for how much base? Considering I am the guy that first ran a 5k after age 30, and had already completed an IM at that point in time. (maybe I should start a coaching group for slackers...)

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1 hour ago, Stikman said:

It sounds like you've got the first key to the puzzle sorted.  Make your goals fit the context of your existing life.  Don't set yourself up for failure (either with the sport or other areas of your life) by being too ambitious, especially when it's your first and you have no idea what might be involved to achieve them.

Keeping the relationship with wife and the kids in a good place should be #1 priority, always.  Make sure that not only are you around but that when you are you're present.

What this guy and others have said.  Sure, some people will say some you can have both but it's really not worth the risk.  

I would rather cross the line dead last & get hug from my wife and daughter than finish with a KQ spot and head to an empty hotel room. 

 

 

 

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Another plus for training solo is you cant get caught up with other peoples goals or sessions. You do your stuff at your pace & enjoy a social run or ride when you can. Its so easy to suddenly change your goals & focus on other stuff that wont help & possibly stress you - because others around you are doing it

Good luck & have fun 👌

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16 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I used to roll up 3 or 4 sets and commute on the train once a week with it, then hang them up at work. You can take all the bulky stuff in on that 1 day, then just the essentials when you are on the bike.

I do something very similar and quiet enjoy it.

On another note, getting your head around early starts can be quiet daunting. One coach gave me some great advice regarding this. He said if I really didn't feel like getting out of bed to train, just get up anyway, get dressed (I always had my gear set out ready to go) and take 6 steps out the door. If I still really didn't want to train to go back to bed as at that point I probably needed the mental rest rest more than training anyway. In a 3 month IM build I tested this many times but did not go back to bed once.

Good luck with it all.

Cheers

NSF

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Like others above I think the key is working out what works for you... my other tip would be to see if there are ways to use time as efficiently as you can... and work out little things that help make it more fun / interesting... background from me...

When I was single about 5-6 years ago, I trained with a squad, coach and followed a program to the letter - this meant 5:45am sessions 5-6 days a week, which, at the time was fine as I was able to wake and go to bed when I felt like it... On this basis I ticked off a few bucket list goals - of getting to and through a few full Ironman races... but it's hard on the social life and sleep-front and general fatigue (for me anyway)

Since then, life's changed (for the better!) and I'm less fussed about the longer stuff so I've just been ticking over doing bits and pieces for a few years. This year, I decided I wanted to snag a spot for the Nice 70.3 worlds but couldn't afford a 'full' squad/training/programme set-up (in terms of time or $ commitment)... so I opted for a 4 month plan (from Chris at PB3) which worked well for me. I jumped in with the squad sessions as and when I could (which wasn't very often!), but adapted and adjusted as much as I could to suit me:

- doing all the swim sessions solo during the middle of the day (I work about 2 mins from a great pool, and am not getting up at 5am to swim!)

- doing majority of the bike sessions indoors on Zwift in the evenings (I've found the workouts and some of the spin/sprint/group rides/races on Zwift make indoor training way more interesting and enjoyable)

- doing a lot of the runs to get to / from work - it's about a 45 minute commute on public transport anyway, or an 8-20km run (depending which way I go) so a better use of my time and way to get 'free' km's in

- looking for things like parkrun every now and again to use for a bit of 'race-pace', challenge or to keep tabs on how you're going

On this basis, I managed to get through the 4 month training block pretty well, with what felt like minimal interruption on life / work

Good luck!

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14 hours ago, Surfer said:

Another plus for training solo is you cant get caught up with other peoples goals or sessions.

There is also no risk of banging your training partner. 

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Do you have clashes with yours and your wife's schedules impacting on training?

I found that a smart trainer and Zwift as a game changer for our family. Both my wife and I like to train in the mornings and this became impossible once we had kids. That was until we got onto Zwift and now we just take turns with who gets to go out into the real world for swimming/running/whatever and whoever is left behind can do their cycle sessions.

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I generally organise my week with

  • swims at lunch
  • bike (zwift) finishing by 6:30-7:00am (pushing the start earlier depending on the length)
  • runs where they fit (try to add them on bike days)

Usually about 8 hours a week as a base and building into races.

Consistency and sustainability are key. Enjoy it @Stuie016

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2 hours ago, Gundy said:

Do you have clashes with yours and your wife's schedules impacting on training?

 

28 minutes ago, xblane said:

I generally organise my week with

My wife will email my coach etc with all family events etc, travel days etc.

I just do what I'm told.

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20 hours ago, Bored@work said:

What this guy and others have said.  Sure, some people will say some you can have both but it's really not worth the risk.  

I would rather cross the line dead last & get hug from my wife and daughter than finish with a KQ spot and head to an empty hotel room. 

I do think you can do it, but it requires give and take from both people.  Plenty of people out there hitting the pub with no care for the family at home, my time is in the dark hours of the morning and before lunch on a saturday generally.  I also finish a lot of my training to meet them on the weekend.  Whether its a sunday arvo run finishing at the fish and chip shop or a long run finishing at the skate park for a coffee and breaky.  Im not missing anything before the sun comes up and I always stop in the finish shute to give my gf a cuddle and kiss cause without her giving me her support I couldnt do it so maybe Im just lucky to have such a supportive partner.

 

On the flip side she has cost a min on 2 occassions in Ironman the most recent at busso, 9:09 sounds so much better than 9:10...

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15 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

I do think you can do it, but it requires give and take from both people.  Plenty of people out there hitting the pub with no care for the family at home, my time is in the dark hours of the morning and before lunch on a saturday generally.  I also finish a lot of my training to meet them on the weekend.  Whether its a sunday arvo run finishing at the fish and chip shop or a long run finishing at the skate park for a coffee and breaky.  Im not missing anything before the sun comes up and I always stop in the finish shute to give my gf a cuddle and kiss cause without her giving me her support I couldnt do it so maybe Im just lucky to have such a supportive partner.

 

On the flip side she has cost a min on 2 occassions in Ironman the most recent at busso, 9:09 sounds so much better than 9:10...

Yep this is exactly what I do. Except my wife likes watching late night movies together etc so the early starts are about 7am :) 

 

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4 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

BTW - good luck with early starts once jnr pops out

Ive got a 6month gap between jnr's expected arrival and my next race and that race is an Oly ;)

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Heaps of great logic here Stui 

 

Consistency is the best way to get fit. Bugger volume. Little bits filling the cup drip by drip are easier for everyone in your life to cope with. You'll be right mate. Good luck and most importantly... 

 

HAVE FUN AND SMILE 😎👍

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I like to train before work and at lunchtime. So most days, once I've finished work I can just go home and relax. So I spend most evenings with my wife (kids have now grown up). I get up at 5am every morning (even on rest days) and try to be in bed by 9pm (doesn't always work).

Swimming is more than half way to work, so the first part of the commute (at 5:15am) is done with no traffic. Lunchtimes I use for running (only twice a week at the moment) or strength/stretch sessions (I book out a meeting room and close the blinds). Saturday mornings are generally my long ride (3 to 4 hours) and Sunday morning is a long run. I'm generally finished my weekend sessions between 9 and 10am. Nearly all my runs are done solo. I also have the luxury of working from home one day a week. This allows me to get in a quality 2 hour ride between 5:30-7:30am and still manage to start work by 8am.

Before an 'A' race, I'll often take a day off work every 2nd week (may 3 times over 6 weeks) to do an extra long ride. Love these days. Ride 120 to 160km in the morning. Come home, have lunch, 30 min nap, then watch a movie on Netflix in the afternoon before the wife comes home. And obviously I cook dinner on those days.

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31 minutes ago, FFF1077 said:

Heaps of great logic here Stui 

 

Consistency is the best way to get fit. Bugger volume. Little bits filling the cup drip by drip are easier for everyone in your life to cope with. You'll be right mate. Good luck and most importantly... 

 

HAVE FUN AND SMILE 😎👍

This is closest to my approach. Consistency is key. I train solo 99% of the time and probably only 4-6hrs per week. 2 or 3 rides, 2 or 3 runs, 1 swim (maybe 2 for a few weeks before a 70.3) per week. Before a 70.3 I build one of the rides and one of the runs up to be long(ish) each week to make sure I can go the distance, but even that's probably only a 2 or 3 hour ride and maybe 15k run. That gets me round 70.3 in about 5.15, which suits my goals and my training/family balance. There's no question that extra training time brings results, but if you're just looking to finish there's no need to go overboard, especially if it puts family life at risk.

PS I don't do any early morning sessions.

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7 hours ago, bRace said:

This is closest to my approach. Consistency is key. I train solo 99% of the time and probably only 4-6hrs per week. 2 or 3 rides, 2 or 3 runs, 1 swim (maybe 2 for a few weeks before a 70.3) per week. Before a 70.3 I build one of the rides and one of the runs up to be long(ish) each week to make sure I can go the distance, but even that's probably only a 2 or 3 hour ride and maybe 15k run. That gets me round 70.3 in about 5.15, which suits my goals and my training/family balance. There's no question that extra training time brings results, but if you're just looking to finish there's no need to go overboard, especially if it puts family life at risk.

PS I don't do any early morning sessions.

This I think puts all of my concerns to bed reading this post.  This is basically precisely what I would be able to achieve in a normal week.  Also based on reading the posts of all of you extremely helpful souls I am comfortable in knowing that quantity will get me to the line and if time permits quality will give me a cherry on top.

Thank you to this awesome community.

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20 hours ago, Bored@work said:

BTW - good luck with early starts once jnr pops out

I’m glad that someone raised this - I’ve lost count of the number of times people have suggested an early start solution to fitting in swim/bike/run around family, but neglect to add the caveat that it requires your kids don’t also wake early (how many under 10s reliably sleep past 6am?) or a spouse/partner who is ok with regularly flying solo on the morning shift.

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1 minute ago, trilobite said:

I’m glad that someone raised this - I’ve lost count of the number of times people have suggested an early start solution to fitting in swim/bike/run around family, but neglect to add the caveat that it requires your kids don’t also wake early (how many under 10s reliably sleep past 6am?) or a spouse/partner who is ok with regularly flying solo on the morning shift.

Yeah with my first I was quite lucky as she slept till 6.30 so I could do a session before then and be back to get her ready for daycare while wife got ready for work. Tried the same with number 2 but she started waking at 5 which meant a 3.30 start for me and then she started waking at 4 so i just ended up doing long hilly walks with her in her pram instead.. 

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People are always looking to justify what they do as right.  Looking to others so they can justify doing less or not doing it at all.  Successful ones figure out how to get it done and do it.

 

Not having a go at anyone just calling it how I see it and I've been there myself.

 

Ill report back after Jnr arrives 😂

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1 minute ago, RunBrettRun said:

People are always looking to justify what they do as right.  Looking to others so they can justify doing less or not doing it at all.  Successful ones figure out how to get it done and do it.

 

Not having a go at anyone just calling it how I see it and I've been there myself.

 

Ill report back after Jnr arrives 😂

Good one AP

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7 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

People are always looking to justify what they do as right.  Looking to others so they can justify doing less or not doing it at all.  Successful ones figure out how to get it done and do it.

 

Not having a go at anyone just calling it how I see it and I've been there myself.

 

Ill report back after Jnr arrives 😂

When did you move to Brisbane?

What I do is right for me, I couldn't give a rats toss bag about what works for others. 

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3 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

When did you move to Brisbane?

What I do is right for me, I couldn't give a rats toss bag about what works for others. 

Triggered much?

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No not at all.  The rats toss bad comment is a reference to a Mitch Anderson post back in the day.

As I said I do what training is right for me. I enjoy sleeping in, spending time with my girls, working etc. Training is something I do when I want to and it fits in around the family.

I may have missed it but I can't see where anyone tried to justify what they do as right. One guy asked for advice everyone else mentioned what works for them.

Some people like to get on this site & self promote their way as being the only way. Then ridicule others for taking a different approach.

 

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I read a lot of the posts here differently to you then.   

I am the last person to tell someone what they should or shouldn't do.  Reading comments saying "I can't" or "its not possible" or "it's too risky", that's a cop out in my eyes.  I looked for the justification over the last 12 months and it sent me into a spiral with training and I had to dig myself out of it otherwise it would continue to hurt me not only with results but mentally.

Your attitude is perfect, " I won't cause other things are more important".  That's not a cop out that's being realistic and honest.  

 

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46 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

People are always looking to justify what they do as right.  Looking to others so they can justify doing less or not doing it at all.  Successful ones figure out how to get it done and do it.

 

Not having a go at anyone just calling it how I see it and I've been there myself.

 

Ill report back after Jnr arrives 😂

My initial post was not intended to see what little I could get away with but more about what is perceived to be required to achieve a goal by others who have experienced the journey already.  Sorry if it came across that way, but certainly in no way intended.

As a novice to the sport I am still finding my way and trying not to make mistakes which may result in me walking away broken.

If I am unable to put the required time in to achieve my goal due to family and life commitments then I will reassess my goals and try again when life allows.

I understand what works for one will not necessarily work for others but some guidance in the right direction goes a long way to be able to work out what actually works for each individual.

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Yep asking advice is a great way to start and my comment was not directed at you .  Coming into an open forum and asking it will get you advice from a whole range of people in different situations, with different goals and different levels of motivation.  Choosing which advice you take and leave is going to be very difficult without knowing the back ground behind that.  You might actually be able to achieve a whole lot more than some people for a number of reasons.

 

I see a lot of myself over the past 1-2 years in some of the comments above, that was the reason for my post.

 

Bored@ has a great attitude he is honest as to why he does what he is doing.  I will be in the same situation come late May 2019, there will be more important things in my life than training at that time.  It wont be because I can't do it but because I don't want to.  

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I don't know if you're in a position to do this, but something I've done in the past is to arrange a couple of weeks of rec leave from work during the training block. For me, it's helped relieve some of the time pressure of fitting training in around work etc and potentially prevents wearing myself out too much. It can also be a chance to add a bit of volume to your program, that might not otherwise fit in with day to day life.

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22 hours ago, bRace said:

I don't know if you're in a position to do this, but something I've done in the past is to arrange a couple of weeks of rec leave from work during the training block. For me, it's helped relieve some of the time pressure of fitting training in around work etc and potentially prevents wearing myself out too much. It can also be a chance to add a bit of volume to your program, that might not otherwise fit in with day to day life.

For me (I'm old and frail), my body cannot handle a week of training 'pro' style. So instead I just take the odd day off mid week. Getting one extra 'big' day of training mid week can make a big difference to my training and it is not affecting the family. Taking a full week or two means your amount of annual leave available will get out of sync with your partner.

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And if you have 15 - 30 mins to spare at home a couple of days a week, don't forget to get some strength work in. A swiss ball and mat is magic at home. You can try multiple core with the ball plus use the mat for things like push-ups, multiple planks etc. Just look through Youtube. If your missus if reasonable, you could even do it in the loungeroom while she is watching TV.

You never can do too much quality core work.

FM

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On 20/12/2018 at 10:44 AM, trilobite said:

I’m glad that someone raised this - I’ve lost count of the number of times people have suggested an early start solution to fitting in swim/bike/run around family, but neglect to add the caveat that it requires your kids don’t also wake early (how many under 10s reliably sleep past 6am?) or a spouse/partner who is ok with regularly flying solo on the morning shift.

I’ve got 2 kids 4 and under, and I do most of my training in the morning. Apart from swimming and velodrome (which I do on the way to work), I can do my track sets near home, and zwift in the garage, and still be at/back at home for when they wake up to sort the breakfasts etc. 

That means my wife only does 3 days solo while I train, and we do Saturdays together as that’s the pre agreed family day with no training.

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3 hours ago, The new guy said:

I’ve got 2 kids 4 and under, and I do most of my training in the morning. Apart from swimming and velodrome (which I do on the way to work), I can do my track sets near home, and zwift in the garage, and still be at/back at home for when they wake up to sort the breakfasts etc. 

That means my wife only does 3 days solo while I train, and we do Saturdays together as that’s the pre agreed family day with no training.

It gets easier as the kids get older. My daughter is 14 & loves running with her old man. 

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2 hours ago, Bored@work said:

It gets easier as the kids get older. My daughter is 14 & loves running with her old man. 

The old man won't love it when she starts kicking his butt and dragging him along :P:lol:

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