Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
FatPom

More internet diagnosis

Recommended Posts

All the usual caveats. I'm booked in to see a specialist privately next week, which will be £320 plus imaging (plus any treatment) but I'm wondering if there is a better (cheaper) way forward.

About 4 weeks ago I ran a 10km on gravel (in the rain),  nothing crazy fast, 46 mins.  Since then, I've had this pain in my left big toe that's seems to be getting worse but not exactly sure. The pain is directly under the largest part of the big toe and feels very localised, almost like a splinter.  It seems to only happen when i run, walking and cycling completely unaffected. 

I have completed some easy runs since but any faster stuff sees it return. Sometimes there is a 'tingling sensation' as well.  I was warming up for park run last Saturday and bailed as even in warm up it came back.  It's very frustrating.

I looked up some stuff on t'web and came across things like turf foot and other crap i didn't understand.  I saw our work Dr yesterday and she referred me to specialist (the appt next week).  If it's a time thing, I rather get on the longer wait for NHS but don't want to that if it needs specialist attention.

I'm just pissed off that something as small as a big toe is so expensive. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a brain op FP. That's why it's expensive, lol.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you've got a painful sesamoid. Probably. 
Treatment depends on exactly what's going on and how irritable it is.

Edited by Aidan
.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Aidan said:

you've got a painful sesamoid. Probably. 
Treatment depends on exactly what's going on and how irritable it is.

Yeah I read about those but it seems to affect the side of the toe, rather than bottom.  It's bad enough that I have to favour my other foot, so not something I can tolerate whilst running.

Is it a surgery type thing?  (bloody hope not).

It's very frustrating because for the first time in years, I have some run consistency :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Parkside said:

Directly under the toe where weight goes: sesamoid.

Side of toe; ? joint angry: turf toe/synovitis

Cheers Parky. Definitely under the toe, like a knitting needle in it :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Fat Pom (from your fellow Winchester person!)...

I was going to say Sesamoid too - like the other folks on here... have had them a couple of times, mine felt like a small pea in size / shape and yes, they bloody hurt and irritate! I saw a physio for mine and managed to get through Ironman training with one... I just dug out the e-mail from the physio with their advice in case it's of use to you: 

"Try cutting out a bit of padding that goes under / around the toe with the sesamoid and placing the joint into flexion (don't stretch it !!!) It can can be ice massaged with an ice cube right on the pain, you can take ibuprofen (if safe for you) for a week, wear trainers rather than formal shoes as much as possible. Check out this product too... we sell them in the clinic (www.osmopatch.com) They suck out any inflammation that is close to the surface. The only downside is they can "stink" a bit because they suck out fluid and by the morning they are pretty manky. This could be your secret weapon :) Finally, massage would work nicely around the sesamoid, medial arch and a few of the ankle tendons. Don't massage directly into the painful site."

Cheers, Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alex. (Park Run was canned last week due to bonfire night!)

That's some great info, many thanks matey :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×