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beginnergirl

Japan - expat life

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.. has anyone spend anytime working in Japan? I am headed there for work and will be based in down town Tokyo. Am quite excited but don’t really know what to expect. 

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6 weeks for work in Nagoya in 1998.

I was there last year for my 6th visit. I had a few days in Tokyo this time, but other than being taken to Ueno and Tama Zoos in 1998, I've always avoided Tokyo on previous trips.

How long will you be there and at what time of year?

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I've lived in Tokyo for a bit over ten years. One of the best cities in the world, am sure you'll love it. Check out the Tokyo Expat Facebook page. Lots of good resources there. Feel free to hit me up with any questions and if you need a physio, massage or pilates go to www.tokyophysio.com 😜.

 

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I will be there for a week in November and then most of December and Jan.

I travel a lot for work .... am on a flight most weeks... but for some reason I’m nervous about Japan.

I am not sure if it’s because of the language.. the food. I am sure I will be fine after the first few days.

I will be based onsite at a well known makeup company... every girls dream... so I’m sure and negatives will soon be outweighed by moisturiser and eyeliner! 😂

 

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14 hours ago, beginnergirl said:

I will be there for a week in November and then most of December and Jan.

I travel a lot for work .... am on a flight most weeks... but for some reason I’m nervous about Japan.

I am not sure if it’s because of the language.. the food. I am sure I will be fine after the first few days.

I will be based onsite at a well known makeup company... every girls dream... so I’m sure and negatives will soon be outweighed by moisturiser and eyeliner! 😂

 

No need to be nervous. Relax and enjoy the experience.

Don't worry about the language. Learn the basics of thank you, please, good morning/afternoon/evening, how to introduce yourself and apologising for being unable to speak Japanese. Even a small effort will be viewed favourably.

Many people you meet will have some level of English, especially in the Tokyo and other cities, and many will be forthcoming with offering assistance.

The Japanese are helpful, gracious and solicitous hosts, even toward strangers and often even if they themselves don't speak English. I've never experienced so many spontaneous and unexpected gestures of assistance and kindness as when traveling in Japan.

The food is brilliant. In a country where so many eat out, there are always inexpensive and tasty options. Unless you're vego...... or vegan. Then life will be much harder. If you do tire of the local fare, anything is available in Tokyo.

Some general tips:

  • Carry your business card everywhere. Accept meishi with both hands and take a moment to look at it, don't just stuff it in your pocket. Reciprocate in kind.
  • Carry small gifts to use as expressions of thanks. Small Aussie souvenirs such as koala or kangaroo lapel pins, fridge magnets, clip-on koalas for kids are all ideal.
  • Photos of family, home, Australia, your hobbies, etc are a great social catalyst.
  • Travel when you can. Japan has an extensive and efficient public transport system with rail systems displaying signage in English, even at the smallest stations in rural areas.
  • Tap water is drinkable all over Japan. So is the sake. And biru.....which is available from vending machines.
  • Japan is among the safest countries in the world to travel.
  • The country is culturally rich, steeped in history and tradition. Kyoto is sublime.
  • 60% of Japan is forested with numerous National Parks, Quasi-national Parks and other protected areas. Despite the densely populated major cities, it is still possible to get away from it all.
  • Onsen! Relax and meet some locals. Acquaint yourself with the basic etiquette. Never walk through a door naked unless you have seen someone else do so before you.
  • Smile and bow.
  • Don't blow your nose in public.
  • You will inevitably make cultural gaffes, but as a gaijin you are expected to do so and you will be forgiven, so don't stress about it.
  • Running is a popular sport in Japan. Many of the major races will book out early, but there are plenty of smaller local events. Finding events can be difficult without the help of someone who can read Japanese, but it will be an experience in itself.
  • And regardless of your body shape, for a few months you will feel statuesque and buxom.
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10 hours ago, zed said:

Are you racing Busso beginnergirl?

No but will come down and watch if I’m around..... 😊

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What Paul Every said. We just visited for the first time and can’t wait to go back. 

On the cosmetics front I have one word. Makanai. 

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On ‎3‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 3:41 PM, Paul Every said:

basic etiquette. Never walk through a door naked unless you have seen someone else do so before you.

This is one etiquette rule I live my life by. :)

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