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Flanman

Rim Brakes to Disc Brakes

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I don't think there is any frame that will allow you to do that. 

You need mounting holes in the frame/ fork to mount the disc brake calipers to. 

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6 minutes ago, roxii said:

I don't think there is any frame that will allow you to do that. 

You need mounting holes in the frame/ fork to mount the disc brake calipers to. 

This 

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Don’t listen to the haters flanman. You can do anything you like....

no holes in your frame or fork? Just drill em yourself. If you want to route the cable internal just drill a few more holes so it looks clean. 

Easy job if you ask me. 

 

Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for this post whatsoever. If you’re dumb enough to take this advice (not aimed at you FM) then natural selection will run its course. 

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Guys, we've put a man on the moon (or so they would have us believe) so of course you can.

 

Seriously though, yes, but be careful clamping the adaptors on to carbon. :)

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4 hours ago, Flanman said:

Has anyone changed their rim brakes to disc brakes on their roadie ?

FM

All together now Trannies " you need a new bike"   

*said very loud in our best "look behind you" pantomime voice 🤡

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14 minutes ago, Surfer said:

All together now Trannies " you need a new bike"   

*said very loud in our best "look behind you" pantomime voice 🤡

New bike! 

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After having my current steed for 10 years + now, the frame is showing wear and tear. I guess it's time for a new bike. So I need to decide.

I would like to hear your thoughts/experience on rim brakes vs disc. Are there any big differences in types of discs (i.e.whats better, what to look for) ?. I usually ride ally and am not interested in di2. Whilst I currently run Ultegra, I expect 105 will be fine for the Ks I do.

As background, I will ride the roadie approx. 4K a year, 70% by myself, 30% in peloton. No races, only fundraising rides. I expect this bike should be used for another 6-10 years.

Thanks

FM

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Everything will be disc soon-people want to buy them to have the 'latest and greatest' regardless of whether they are actually any better, and companies need to move to disc so that they aren't seen to be being left behind and it creates a drive to sell more bikes.

And then in 5 years or so when everyone realises they have been stooged one of the big brands will bring out a 'revolutionary' rim brake to start the flow back in the opposite direction...

FWIW I have never had any problems stopping with rim brakes and for 3 years I rode 70ks a day in all sorts of horrendous Melbourne weather. I have ridden motorbikes all my life so fully understand the advantages disk brakes can offer but when you are trying to stop 180kgs compared to 8kgs its not exactly apples for apples..

 

 

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Go and test ride a Giant Defy. 

It will tick all your boxes and give you the best ride for what you are going to be asking of it for a good price. 

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2 hours ago, Flanman said:

I would like to hear your thoughts/experience on rim brakes vs disc. Are there any big differences in types of discs (i.e.whats better, what to look for) ?. I usually ride ally and am not interested in di2. Whilst I currently run Ultegra, I expect 105 will be fine for the Ks I do.

Disc brakes will be heavier overall but give you better braking performance in the wet.

Personally, I love them for offroad stuff where I need to brake consistently all the time. 

Don't need em for road riding/tri in my opinion. In fact, disc brakes on triathlon bikes seems like such overkill. 

Also, disc brakes seem to need far more upkeep that good ol' rims. Hence why I have no issue going rim brakes on my road bike. Save the cash on the disc upgrade and get nice wheels.

Edited by dazmuzza
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1 hour ago, more said:

Everything will be disc soon-people want to buy them to have the 'latest and greatest' regardless of whether they are actually any better, and companies need to move to disc so that they aren't seen to be being left behind and it creates a drive to sell more bikes.

And then in 5 years or so when everyone realises they have been stooged one of the big brands will bring out a 'revolutionary' rim brake to start the flow back in the opposite direction...

FWIW I have never had any problems stopping with rim brakes and for 3 years I rode 70ks a day in all sorts of horrendous Melbourne weather. I have ridden motorbikes all my life so fully understand the advantages disk brakes can offer but when you are trying to stop 180kgs compared to 8kgs its not exactly apples for apples..

 

 

I totally agree that in many cases disk brakes can be overkill. But You must be a very light rider indeed to only need to stop 8kg... is this an attempt to justify some amazing zwift rides or something? 😉 😂

Edited by dazaau
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Stopping/slowing in the wet is much better/safer with disc than rim in my experience.

I have the Giant Defy which Roxii referred too. So far I am very happy with the disc brakes.

ST recently had a primer on disk brakes - worth a read.

https://www.slowtwitch.com/Tech/Disc_Brake_Primer_-_Part_1_6977.html

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8 hours ago, dazaau said:

I totally agree that in many cases disk brakes can be overkill. But You must be a very light rider indeed to only need to stop 8kg... is this an attempt to justify some amazing zwift rides or something? 😉 😂

Lol no I was comparing bike weights 😜 An average road bike is around 180kgs compared to around 8-9kgs for a good pushy.

i dunno, I’ve just never been in a situation where I’ve thought ‘dam is wish I had more stopping power’

I can understand their attraction though from a carbon perspective and not having to have the carbon track wear out from braking

 

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2 hours ago, more said:

Lol no I was comparing bike weights 😜 An average road bike is around 180kgs compared to around 8-9kgs for a good pushy.

i dunno, I’ve just never been in a situation where I’ve thought ‘dam is wish I had more stopping power’

I can understand their attraction though from a carbon perspective and not having to have the carbon track wear out from braking

 

Yes, locking up the road bike tyres is certainly not hard to achieve if that's what you want! Not sure why you need even more grip. I'm too scared to brake hard on the road anyway! 

Doing 80-90kg of bike and rider on 20mm of smooth tyre is never going to be very quick.

Edited by dazaau

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42 minutes ago, dazaau said:

Yes, locking up the road bike tyres is certainly not hard to achieve if that's what you want! Not sure why you need even more grip. I'm too scared to brake hard on the road anyway! 

Doing 80-90kg of bike and rider on 20mm of smooth tyre is never going to be very quick.

A lot of people say that you have greater ability to not lock, as you can better modulate the braking with discs.

Me, I'm old school and don't find an issue with rim brakes. Now that we use dual pivot. The old single pivot, or worse, the Campag Delta brakes were absolutely horrendous.

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I use both - discs on the Commuter and the MTB and Rim brakes on everything else. The cross bike uses cantilevers on rim and this is still the mainstay for most Euro Cross competitors .... where I take my tips from. 

I don't think there is much of a difference TBH. You get a feel for squeegying the rim in the wet and discs can also lock pretty easily.

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20 hours ago, Flanman said:

I usually ride ally and am not interested in di2. Whilst I currently run Ultegra, I expect 105 will be fine for the Ks I do.

As background, I will ride the roadie approx. 4K a year, 70% by myself, 30% in peloton. No races, only fundraising rides. I expect this bike should be used for another 6-10 years.

Thanks

FM

CAAD 12 Disc.

Sorted!

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3 hours ago, trickle said:

CAAD 12 Disc. 

Sorted!

I used to ride a Cameldale years ago and really enjoyed it - did a fair few TRIs on it with clip-ons. Actually they have a few specials with these and they also look quite good. Thanks, I'll keep them in mind. 

FM

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I have had disk's on road bike about 18 months, really like them. But also ride another bike without and yes different feel but not alot of difference. The main difference is feel, slowing in wet with carbon rims (disk no difference, rim very different to dry alloy rims).

I think the big difference is going to be around wheels going forward, if you like upgrading then carbon wheels, based on disk brakes will be more varied and has better scope.

I am waiting for tri bikes to have disks before upgrading there so i only need one wheel protocol

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1 hour ago, rory-dognz said:

The main difference is feel, slowing in wet with carbon rims (disk no difference, rim very different to dry alloy rims).

What do you mean by - rim very different to dry alloy rims ?

FM

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6 minutes ago, Flanman said:

What do you mean by - rim very different to dry alloy rims ?

FM

Slowing in the wet on carbon rims is very different to dry alloy rims.

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I've got discs on my roadie. I will never go back to rim brakes.  They work well in the wet and i find myself generally braking later when it's dry. They've never locked up either.  I've replaced the rear pads twice in about 15000km.  No need to worry about deterioration of the braking surface either.  It won't be an option soon anyway.

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7 hours ago, Flanman said:

What do you mean by - rim very different to dry alloy rims ?

FM

As ex said above. Rim brakes on my HED stingers in the rain was a unnerving experience. Where with disk brakes the rim material does not affect braking. 

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7 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Slowing in the wet on carbon rims is very different to dry alloy rims.

Uh huh........

But apples with apples? 

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