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Best AG IM coaches - QLD or Online

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22 hours ago, pieman said:

Yeah up at 3 to leave the GC to swim with the crazies...

 

The second part sounds exactly like AP to!! 

There is one crazy that does exactly that. Common....you know you want to. Just go to bed 1 hr earlier.

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He can bleed you dry!

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10 hours ago, trilobite said:

I want to know what Ben Greenfield can do for me at these prices (USD):

 

9BE306BE-EFBC-432A-8174-FC6D07617897.png

Give you a  powerband and align your chakras... 

His latest thing was  penile injections there was quite a good thread on ST calling him out/ridiculing him.. 😁

Edited by pieman

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57 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

How many people who get up at 3am to train are still in the sport two years later? 

Sounds like Ben Greenfield can get you “up” round the clock - although whether you use that to ride up Mt Coot-tha in the rain or do something else is a different call

 

1 hour ago, pieman said:

Give you a  powerband and align your chakras... 

His latest thing was  penile injections there was quite a good thread on ST calling him out/ridiculing him.. 😁

 

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14 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

I'm usually up at 3am.  Don't normally get a ride though.  Sometimes I get lucky.

Probs not doing it right

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16 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

I'm usually up at 3am.  Don't normally get a ride though.  Sometimes I get lucky.

I must be getting old. I used to still be up at 3 a lot when I was in my 20's. Would often still be on a ride.

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3 hours ago, Bored@work said:

How many people who get up at 3am to train are still in the sport two years later? 

Actually I know of 4 still at it 10yrs later - not getting up as early now but still in the game 

I find it no problem getting up at 4-4.15 every day when I have strong goals and also commitments to meet someone - over 32yrs I've had times when I have struggled to get out but that passes as I reset goals - I think it takes a special kind of motivation to get up at that time on your own - the people most likely to be able to do it are those who have qualified for their first Hawaii Ironman - they have "The Kona Curse" they'll do anything they have to be held back

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24 minutes ago, AP said:

Actually I know of 4 still at it 10yrs later - not getting up as early now but still in the game 

I find it no problem getting up at 4-4.15 every day when I have strong goals and also commitments to meet someone - over 32yrs I've had times when I have struggled to get out but that passes as I reset goals - I think it takes a special kind of motivation to get up at that time on your own - the people most likely to be able to do it are those who have qualified for their first Hawaii Ironman - they have "The Kona Curse" they'll do anything they have to be held back

So not many still in the game then.

 

 

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1 hour ago, AP said:

I find it no problem getting up at 4-4.15 every day

I once trained with a girl that moved from Noosa to Melbourne.  She said she had to get up at 4am as it was just too hot to train after 9am other than swimming.

So I see why you do.  

Most in Melb and Sydney can also run at lunch and in the early evening.  Not something I'd want to do in the middle of summer in Brisbane.  Or Perth for that matter when it's hitting 42c each day.  (Unless the freo dr is in)

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21 minutes ago, Peter said:

Most in Melb and Sydney can also run at lunch and in the early evening.  Not something I'd want to do in the middle of summer in Brisbane.  Or Perth for that matter when it's hitting 42c each day.  (Unless the freo dr is in)

It does help to prepare you for Kona however, the same as the people I'm swimming with will be OWS right through winter to prepare themselves for the Channel.

And it's not that bad running here in Summer once you are used to it, and you are sensible about where you do it.

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41 minutes ago, Peter said:

I once trained with a girl that moved from Noosa to Melbourne.  She said she had to get up at 4am as it was just too hot to train after 9am other than swimming.

So I see why you do.  

Most in Melb and Sydney can also run at lunch and in the early evening.  Not something I'd want to do in the middle of summer in Brisbane.  Or Perth for that matter when it's hitting 42c each day.  (Unless the freo dr is in)

Early evening is family time and i can get 2 x 30min lunch runs a week if I am lucky  (any longer and i need to arrive earlier or stay later which eats at that family time..). 

Hence why i am doing no training at the moment except bike commuting 

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Just now, pieman said:

Early evening is family time and i can get 2 x 30min lunch runs a week if I am lucky  (any longer and i need to arrive earlier or stay later which eats at that family time..). 

Hence why i am doing no training at the moment except bike commuting 

It's interesting how much a selfish sport Ironman really is.

Since having a family I have struggled with training.  Be that kids sport on a weekend and weekdays from 3:30-7:30 is a write off and then after kid is asleep its a bit rude to go out swimming or doing a turbo and the wife is like WTF?

So before is the only time to train or at lunch (which is a struggle when work is really busy)

Before work and home by 7:20am is the only time to train weekdays.

I really don't get how people with 2 kids and a partner have balance when training for an Ironman.  Something has to give.

Be that doing a fast time or family time.  I don't believe you can long term have a family and train 15+ hours a week plus a job.  Something has to suffer.  And at the end of the day, for me Family comes first.  Then the job, then triathlons.

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Is that 4 people out of your 74 Kona qualifiers or 4 people out of all the people you have coached? If so the % is still very low.

To get up at 3am or 4am I would need to be going to bed about 8pm.  

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15 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

Is that 4 people out of your 74 Kona qualifiers or 4 people out of all the people you have coached? If so the % is still very low.

To get up at 3am or 4am I would need to be going to bed about 8pm.  

Don’t worry. Your daughter can lock the doors and pack the dishwasher before she goes at 10pm 

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

It's interesting how much a selfish sport Ironman really is.

Since having a family I have struggled with training.  Be that kids sport on a weekend and weekdays from 3:30-7:30 is a write off and then after kid is asleep its a bit rude to go out swimming or doing a turbo and the wife is like WTF?

So before is the only time to train or at lunch (which is a struggle when work is really busy)

Before work and home by 7:20am is the only time to train weekdays.

I really don't get how people with 2 kids and a partner have balance when training for an Ironman.  Something has to give.

Be that doing a fast time or family time.  I don't believe you can long term have a family and train 15+ hours a week plus a job.  Something has to suffer.  And at the end of the day, for me Family comes first.  Then the job, then triathlons.

This is reality for the 40 plus brigade. While you can still fit in a good number of hours and go okay, the limits are the job, the family time, which are really not limits, they are more important. You can be up early and train, that is until your kid is sick or is scared and needs to be looked after. Spouses have jobs as well and need to be prioritised.

Can still get in a solid 12 hours a week though. Challenge is when life starts wearing you down, training breaks you down, sickness fatigue all make for bad dad and not best at work

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

It's interesting how much a selfish sport Ironman really is.

Since having a family I have struggled with training.  Be that kids sport on a weekend and weekdays from 3:30-7:30 is a write off and then after kid is asleep its a bit rude to go out swimming or doing a turbo and the wife is like WTF?

So before is the only time to train or at lunch (which is a struggle when work is really busy)

Before work and home by 7:20am is the only time to train weekdays.

I really don't get how people with 2 kids and a partner have balance when training for an Ironman.  Something has to give.

Be that doing a fast time or family time.  I don't believe you can long term have a family and train 15+ hours a week plus a job.  Something has to suffer.  And at the end of the day, for me Family comes first.  Then the job, then triathlons.

Change sport.  Unless you really have a genuine life-long boner for Triathlon, it does has a very poor ROI for just being fit and healthy.

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4 minutes ago, Mank said:

Change sport.  Unless you really have a genuine life-long boner for Triathlon, it does has a very poor ROI for just being fit and healthy.

Nah I just do shorter stuff now. 

Love the sport. Just can’t do 6 hr weekend bike rides and double day sessions. 

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54 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

This is reality for the 40 plus brigade. While you can still fit in a good number of hours and go okay, the limits are the job, the family time, which are really not limits, they are more important. You can be up early and train, that is until your kid is sick or is scared and needs to be looked after. Spouses have jobs as well and need to be prioritised.

Can still get in a solid 12 hours a week though. Challenge is when life starts wearing you down, training breaks you down, sickness fatigue all make for bad dad and not best at work 

totally agree, getting up early to train is easy to say for some. My daughter has sports, musical etc & then homework on top of that. By the time we get home, have dinner, do home work & chill on the couch for an hour it's time for her to go to bed. Then it's time to catch up with my wife and discuss adult stuff like work, planning the rest of the week and other commitments etc. My wife had a shit day at work yesterday so it was a late night as she vented. It's called support & spending time with your family.

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Ill revisit this after Busso in December.  I've signed up and this is my life outside of Triathlon

Im 36

Wife (stay at home mum studying)

8yr old daughter

5 yr old son

Leave home at 0515 start work at 0600

Leave work at 1700, home by 1730

Cannot train during work hours as I am on a gas plant and no feasible way to train in my 30 min lunch break (not allowed outside of gate), and I dont leave my desk for lunch

My son has numerous conditions that require a lot of help at home, so plan is be home for dinner at least 3 nights mon-fri ( i wont eat but ill be there), ill cook and do school lunches etc and let wife study, bed routine for the kids takes us normally an hour.  Ill then train after everything is done for the evening if its a double training day

Morning sessions ill be up and leaving home at 0330 at the latest to get training in and back home for brekkie and get ready for work

Doesn't really leave much time for anything really.  But will see how we go

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21 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

totally agree, getting up early to train is easy to say for some. My daughter has sports, musical etc & then homework on top of that. By the time we get home, have dinner, do home work & chill on the couch for an hour it's time for her to go to bed. Then it's time to catch up with my wife and discuss adult stuff like work, planning the rest of the week and other commitments etc. My wife had a shit day at work yesterday so it was a late night as she vented. It's called support & spending time with your family.

Sounds like you lead a well rounded life with more to it than triathlon/ sports..

I had someone telling me how hard there last IM build was as a working parent.. they work 1 8 hour shift a week which is 5 mins from home. So pretty much a pro triathlete hours between school drop off.. poor thing..

Same with people who work from home as They've saved 1 to  2 hours a day on travel that can be used elswhere..

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1 hour ago, Bored@work said:

Is that 4 people out of your 74 Kona qualifiers or 4 people out of all the people you have coached? If so the % is still very low.

To get up at 3am or 4am I would need to be going to bed about 8pm.  

First thing first - it's 76 qualifiers now

Secondly only a few I've known have ever got up at 3am and then it's not every morning 

But lots regularly get up between 4 and 4.30 - going to bed at 8.30 is not that bad, you sure don't miss any quality on TV - all this angst about getting up early ? What if you were a baker, a butcher? The guy who owns "my coffee shop" is open for business at 5am every day and you'd be amazed how many regular customers he has at that time, all of them have to have been up at least by 4.30am - but the difference is he has passion, for his business, his customers , he has staff come in at 7am and he goes off to do other things, he's just good at time management  

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