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Best AG IM coaches - QLD or Online

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6 minutes ago, AP said:

First thing first - it's 76 qualifiers now

Secondly only a few I've known have ever got up at 3am and then it's not every morning 

But lots regularly get up between 4 and 4.30 - going to bed at 8.30 is not that bad, you sure don't miss any quality on TV - all this angst about getting up early ? What if you were a baker, a butcher? The guy who owns "my coffee shop" is open for business at 5am every day and you'd be amazed how many regular customers he has at that time, all of them have to have been up at least by 4.30am - but the difference is he has passion, for his business, his customers , he has staff come in at 7am and he goes off to do other things, he's just good at time management  

When i was a customer at 'your coffee shop ' (black milk right? ) it was because one of my kids was awake from 4am and would only sleep while in pram.. wish there was a kona for early morning pram walkers..

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30 minutes ago, AP said:

First thing first - it's 76 qualifiers now

Secondly only a few I've known have ever got up at 3am and then it's not every morning 

But lots regularly get up between 4 and 4.30 - going to bed at 8.30 is not that bad, you sure don't miss any quality on TV - all this angst about getting up early ? What if you were a baker, a butcher? The guy who owns "my coffee shop" is open for business at 5am every day and you'd be amazed how many regular customers he has at that time, all of them have to have been up at least by 4.30am - but the difference is he has passion, for his business, his customers , he has staff come in at 7am and he goes off to do other things, he's just good at time management  

You're missing the point. I'm not asking about bakers, butchers and people who run their own business. I'm talking about people who have a 9 to 5 job & families with other commitments outside of triathlon. I think a lot of people would burn out with the 4 to 4:30 starts also. I'm lucky I have a 15min commute to work & flexible hours. I think that is one of the reasons why I have been able to keep racing Ironman for so long. It amazes me when I hear people who have an hour commute to work everyday.

I wish I could go to bed at 8:30. The 1hr of TV is not about the quality of the TV show. It's about spending time with my daughter and relaxing before she goes to bed. We have found with high school, netball, run training, friends and the school musical she is getting stressed and overwhelmed. The chill out time helps her unwind and get ready for bed.

Look at KieranR post above. I wish him all the best & hope he has a great race in Busselton. I loved following his trip to Vietnam for the 70.3. He's seems like a great guy and is focused on finishing Busselton. Do I think he will be able to maintain this drive and determination for another Ironman post Busselton. Nope, I doubt it.

.

 

 

 

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47 minutes ago, pieman said:

Sounds like you lead a well rounded life with more to it than triathlon/ sports..

I had someone telling me how hard there last IM build was as a working parent.. they work 1 8 hour shift a week which is 5 mins from home. So pretty much a pro triathlete hours between school drop off.. poor thing..

Same with people who work from home as They've saved 1 to  2 hours a day on travel that can be used elswhere..

Thanks, it wasn't easy to get to this spot in our lives. My wife & I have been together since high school. racing Ironman in the early days definitely put a strain on our marriage. It took me a while to work out there is more to life than trying to get to Kona or beat such & such in a race.

My wife is super supportive. She helps decide what IM races I'm going to do, talks with my coach re-family time & events we need to attend etc. She books all our flights, hotels and will look for pools etc close by so I can get my training done when we are on the road. I did 3 week trip before Ironman Lousiville (Hong Kong, Macau, New York, Orlando) she booked hotels with a pool close by for everyone.

If I'm training before work she will ask how long the session is so when I get home my coffee, omelette are ready to go.

We are a team & work together. I think the funniest thing she ever did was to tell my coach it was her birthday. That night my program had "cross training" on it.

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10 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

.

Look at KieranR post above. I wish him all the best & hope he has a great race in Busselton. I loved following his trip to Vietnam for the 70.3. He's seems like a great guy and is focused on finishing Busselton. Do I think he will be able to maintain this drive and determination for another Ironman post Busselton. Nope, I doubt it.

.

 

 

 

Rest after busso! Planning a family trip somewhere! Perhaps Canada for a white xmas if funds allow.  I’ll keep training as that’s my new life post being fat and unhealthy but won’t look to race / participate again until 2020 I think.  Maybe do the Broome marathon and the local tri up there next September but that’s it

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1 minute ago, KieranR said:

Rest after busso! Planning a family trip somewhere! Perhaps Canada for a white xmas if funds allow.  I’ll keep training as that’s my new life post being fat and unhealthy but won’t look to race / participate again until 2020 I think.  Maybe do the Broome marathon and the local tri up there next September but that’s it

Good Lucky Buddy. I would love to be there in Busso to see you cross the line.

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2 hours ago, AP said:

First thing first - it's 76 qualifiers now

Secondly only a few I've known have ever got up at 3am and then it's not every morning 

But lots regularly get up between 4 and 4.30 - going to bed at 8.30 is not that bad, you sure don't miss any quality on TV - all this angst about getting up early ? What if you were a baker, a butcher? The guy who owns "my coffee shop" is open for business at 5am every day and you'd be amazed how many regular customers he has at that time, all of them have to have been up at least by 4.30am - but the difference is he has passion, for his business, his customers , he has staff come in at 7am and he goes off to do other things, he's just good at time management  

Getting up early is a must. Can manage most days with families, challenge is when things are not going well, some times you have to drop that work out as wife needs you to spend time with her, sometimes you get bone tired and need to chill.

It's important to recognise when you need to do that and when you use that as an excuse. Business ownership is great as people can leave at 7 and also a challenge as it demands in other ways.

The 8 till 6 white collar mob, we make our choices, don't have luxury of doing much more than a short run at lunch. Found that most of the time:

morning work out 5 days a week, short lunch time. Run longer Saturday, ride longer Sunday, all done early. That gets about 13 hours, then for  6 weeks before an IM lift volume. 

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One of my self imposed conditions when committing to Imoz this year was that I had to limit the time away from my young family for training. A standard day training would be up at 4.30 for swim/run training before work, 45 min commute. We have 1 hour for lunch, so a short run a few days a week, finish about 4pm. 5-7.30 was family time, dinner, baths, books etc. after that was a combo of zwift, or long run on Wednesday nights. Prep all clothing and food requirements for the next day, so all you need to do is wake up and turn on the kettle!

weekends I did bricks on Saturday morning, so I could do swimming lessons with my son at 11.30, then family time. Sunday was  long ride until lunch, then family time and a nap with my daughter.

i tried to manage the bulk of my sessions while the family was asleep - was this optimal? Probably not. But it was the best balance I could manage, and 4.30 starts were the only way to do it.

Ive already had a debrief with my wife, and her comments were that she would be happy for me to do more Ironman races, as she appreciates that the journey has improved me as a person, the only change to make is to the weekend sessions, committing an entire day to family, not just afternoons. And that is not only possible, it may actually be better from a training point of view.

I will try to maintain a high fitness level by doing marathons and 70.3s which dont take the 20-25 hours I was using for IM, and when I commit to another Ironman I know now that I can take that fitness step with a good 3 month lead in.

 

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I'm extremely lucky with Mrs FP.  I have carte blanche to train pretty much e=whenever I like but my body can't handle much these days.

Weekends I try and get things done relatively early and I might get one swim in.   Generally afternoons are family time.

Weekdays, I have a 45min commute each way. No chance of anything early AM.  I can train at lunchtime at the gym. (short runs and strength) but not everyday as calendars get blown out.  Evenings I will typically be home at 5.30. (I finish at 4.45 but start at 7.45), I will jump on the turbo whilst Flipper is having dinner. Finish at 6.30-7.00. Mrs FP will shower Flipper, I will then shower and read her a story in bed.

Wed evenings in summer is a club ride at 7.00, or a TT. Club rides I have a chance to read a story but TTs have to be done straight from work.  One or two weekday nights I will swim, but I have to be out the door by 6.00 and can be back in time for a story.

It's all 'do-able' and I'm averaging 9-10 hrs per week inc strength stuff but it's getting tiring.  People underestimate how physically draining a mentally challenging and politically charged and stressful corporate job can be. Quite often I have to log in and do work after training.

My bike power is up, running is going ok and holding last year's (slow) times swimming but the logistical merry go round leaves little time for enjoying other things in life like surfing, visiting places and just 'stuff'.

I got to bed as early as possible, sometimes 7.40-8.00pm as soon as I have read a story. Sometimes later after and evening ride. I don't go to sleep but just get off my feet. Otherwise I simply can't recover and be on my game at work.

Mrs FP is really encouraging me to do an IM this year as we can both see the writing on the wall as I get older and Flipper starts school and will have her own activities.  

Next year will see me revert to cycle racing/endurance and a bit of running.  I'll still put in decent hours but need to simplify life.

Edited by FatPom
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Jealous.  I haven't ridden or swum in a month, and only easy walks with the dog and my wife still thinks I need to slow down and ease up.

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I'm up drinking coffee & it's before 7am. Might leave soon & drive to the coffee shop for another brew before I meet my mates & go for a beach ride. 

Then home for a quick change before I catch the 1pm crossfire class.

 

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2 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

I'm up drinking coffee & it's before 7am. Might leave soon & drive to the coffee shop for another brew before I meet my mates & go for a beach ride. 

Then home for a quick change before I catch the 1pm crossfire class.

 

Be sure not to do too much or you might end up with vagal nerve dysfunction..

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2 hours ago, The new guy said:

Ive already had a debrief with my wife, and her comments were that she would be happy for me to do more Ironman races, as she appreciates that the journey has improved me as a person

 

You could make some good $$$ sharing the magic words in that discussion 

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1 hour ago, trilobite said:

You could make some good $$$ sharing the magic words in that discussion 

And I'm more than happy to charge $$$ to anyone who wants some  tips!!

I have a very addictive personality, which I recognise. It's very  easy to go overboard once I have a goal, so I use my wife as my voice of reason. I asked her straight away what all the negative parts were of the last 12 months, highlighted the relashionship, family and financial challenges, and then worked out if I could make changes to the approach to overcome those challenges. And the answer is yes, now we have both experinced what it takes to combine IM with children and jobs, we can change the approach to get the balance better. It really shifts the sacrifices back to me, I would need to increase mid week training loads to free up weekend family time, and the decision really comes back to wether I want to make that sacrifice.

And the answer to that is - hell yes.

Edited by The new guy
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Ive already had a debrief with my wife, and her comments were that she would be happy for me to do more Ironman races, as she appreciates that the journey has improved me as a person, the only change to make is to the weekend sessions, committing an entire day to family, not just afternoons. And that is not only possible, it may actually be better from a training point of view.

I will try to maintain a high fitness level by doing marathons and 70.3s which dont take the 20-25 hours I was using for IM, and when I commit to another Ironman I know now that I can take that fitness step with a good 3 month lead in.

You can do well in Ironman on 15hrs a week training - having your rest day as a weekend day is no problem - this is often the balancing move necessary to make the journey sustainable - 15hrs well can be more productive than 20-25hrs if it's structured well and doesn't contain "filling" 😎

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2 hours ago, AP said:

You can do well in Ironman on 15hrs a week training - having your rest day as a weekend day is no problem - this is often the balancing move necessary to make the journey sustainable - 15hrs well can be more productive than 20-25hrs if it's structured well and doesn't contain "filling" 😎

Do you think there’s much truth to the idea that the benefit from volume is quite athlete specific (eg some respond better to lots of low intensity, while others do well on significantly less higher intensity work)?

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4 hours ago, AP said:

You can do well in Ironman on 15hrs a week training - having your rest day as a weekend day is no problem - this is often the balancing move necessary to make the journey sustainable - 15hrs well can be more productive than 20-25hrs if it's structured well and doesn't contain "filling" 😎

Yep, agree totally now I've done one. Half the battle this time was buidling up the base, now it's much easier to just maintain.

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4 minutes ago, moderator2 said:

Posts hidden. Out or respect for the original question. 

There's a couple u missed

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20 minutes ago, moderator2 said:

Posts hidden. Out or respect for the original question. 

All good.  Any chance you can post them back up in a separate thread so I can address the accusations/misinterpretations made?

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6 minutes ago, BogFrog said:

All good.  Any chance you can post them back up in a separate thread so I can address the accusations/misinterpretations made?

On mobile. Will do when I have access to a PC

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I'm up at 3am every day. On weekends and all. I work 6-2:30 Mon - Fri and I have the flexibility to finish early if required. 

Prior to my injury I was training at 3am, working, school pick up, daughter commitments and then train again once I have "been a Dad". 

 

I got fit. I got fatigued. I got isolated. And ended up injured. 

 

Lying on the floor trying to get better over the past few months has been great for me to get a good sensible view of what I actually really want in my life. I won't be regularly racing. I do want to go have a red hot crack at an Ironman one day. But not at the expense of the love of a partner or girlfriend and at the expense of the quality of time I have with my daughter. And IvP did say that he thought there's nothing wrong with "being a hero in my training", the context being that I can't race often. 

I get goosebumps thinking about Ironman. 

I get bigger goosebumps when I get a hug at school pick up time every day. For free. 

 

The choice is easy. 

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On 26/05/2018 at 1:18 PM, trilobite said:

Do you think there’s much truth to the idea that the benefit from volume is quite athlete specific (eg some respond better to lots of low intensity, while others do well on significantly less higher intensity work)?

Low intensity has a place and high intensity has a place - the art of using 15hrs most effectively is by getting that balance right - another thing often over looked is the attention to developing the best technique in each sport so that the 15hrs is all "practice" - when the body/mind only knows good technique - that's what you produce when you get really tired - and every Ironman race I have done, I got really tired somewhere along the way - so if you go into it expecting to get "really tired" but expect to hold good technique, you'll go faster with the same amount of fitness and strength 😁

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1 hour ago, AP said:

Low intensity has a place and high intensity has a place - the art of using 15hrs most effectively is by getting that balance right - another thing often over looked is the attention to developing the best technique in each sport so that the 15hrs is all "practice" - when the body/mind only knows good technique - that's what you produce when you get really tired - and every Ironman race I have done, I got really tired somewhere along the way - so if you go into it expecting to get "really tired" but expect to hold good technique, you'll go faster with the same amount of fitness and strength 😁

Do you reckon many people racing “popular” AGS (eg males between 35 and 45) are getting to Kona on 15 hours a week?

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14 minutes ago, trilobite said:

Do you reckon many people racing “popular” AGS (eg males between 35 and 45) are getting to Kona on 15 hours a week?

I think it depends how long you average that 15 hours a week.  If it's for 2 years then yeah there would be a few.  If its 12 to 16 weeks then prob not.

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Mental strength counts for 2/10ths of£%#*-all if you toe the start line underdone - unless you’re in a “special” AG, you aren’t getting a Kona ticket

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Mental strength can be acknowledging you're under done and adjusting appropriately to get the best you can out of the day.  It might mean your goal is adjusted back 20min.  Being able to not get carried away and hold it together when it does hurt can be the difference between losing 20min or losing 2 hours.

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And mental strength might also manifest as getting up at 3am to ride Mt Coot-tha in the rain (ie getting the training done, which counts for plenty).

But if you haven’t done the training, relative to your genetics, mental strength on race day isn’t going to turn your day into a podium performance.

Going into an IM underdone, but with some will-strength got me a spot in the med-tent, not the top 10 😉

 

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4 hours ago, RunBrettRun said:

I think it depends how long you average that 15 hours a week.  If it's for 2 years then yeah there would be a few.  If its 12 to 16 weeks then prob not.

Jesus! I’m bloody knackered averaging 10hrs a week since March:lol:

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7 minutes ago, trilobite said:

And mental strength might also manifest as getting up at 3am to ride Mt Coot-tha in the rain (ie getting the training done, which counts for plenty).

But if you haven’t done the training, relative to your genetics, mental strength on race day isn’t going to turn your day into a podium performance.

Going into an IM underdone, but with some will-strength got me a spot in the med-tent, not the top 10 😉

 

Loving your contribution to the forum lately. Please keep posting.

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And mental strength might also manifest as getting up at 3am to ride Mt Coot-tha in the rain (ie getting the training done, which counts for plenty).

But if you haven’t done the training, relative to your genetics, mental strength on race day isn’t going to turn your day into a podium performance.

There's no doubt that the work must be done - mental strength is a way of living not something you turn on somewhere during your race - it's the way you are in every part of life

Fifteen hours a week consistently will produce podium positions in any age group as long as nutrition, recovery, body maintenance and discipline (all of these things involve mental strength and commitment to a goal) are done well.

Fifteen hours of quality training can be fitted into a life while still having one weekend day off every week as a family day, most people waste far more than fifteen hours a week doing worthless shit, but they can't see it 🙄

When you talk about "special age groups" there are no easy age groups - you'll find that the people on top of any age group do things that the others are either not prepared to do, or are not able to do - I have been in this game for 32yrs and for the first five years I was not on the podium in any race, but I was watching what the guys on the podium where doing - they were doing things better than me 😪 I thought they were LUCKY it's amazing how much talent and luck you come across when you become committed  

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On 23/05/2018 at 4:00 AM, Cranky said:

Come to Trent Grimsey swim sessions at Centenary at 4:15am. Spend another 30 mins after getting in some more volume, shower and off to work. 

Trent also does a Monday/Wednesday night session at Somerville House starting at 5:30pm if that makes it easier.

His sessions are definitely awesome!

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24 minutes ago, AP said:

There's no doubt that the work must be done - mental strength is a way of living not something you turn on somewhere during your race - it's the way you are in every part of life

Fifteen hours a week consistently will produce podium positions in any age group as long as nutrition, recovery, body maintenance and discipline (all of these things involve mental strength and commitment to a goal) are done well.

Fifteen hours of quality training can be fitted into a life while still having one weekend day off every week as a family day, most people waste far more than fifteen hours a week doing worthless shit, but they can't see it 🙄

When you talk about "special age groups" there are no easy age groups - you'll find that the people on top of any age group do things that the others are either not prepared to do, or are not able to do - I have been in this game for 32yrs and for the first five years I was not on the podium in any race, but I was watching what the guys on the podium where doing - they were doing things better than me 😪 I thought they were LUCKY it's amazing how much talent and luck you come across when you become committed  

Outline such a schedule for us

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29 minutes ago, AP said:

When you talk about "special age groups" there are no easy age groups - you'll find that the people on top of any age group do things that the others are either not prepared to do, or are not able to do - I have been in this game for 32yrs and for the first five years I was not on the podium in any race, but I was watching what the guys on the podium where doing - they were doing things better than me 😪 I thought they were LUCKY it's amazing how much talent and luck you come across when you become committed  

So looking at the results for IM Cairns last year, if I were a 50-54 year old male, podium times were 9:30, 9:43 and 9:44.

By comparison, if I were a 18-24 year old female (ie half the age of the finishers set out above) podium times were 11:46, 12:42 and 13:27.

Are you honestly saying the mature gentlemen would have retained their podium spots doing the same training the young ladies did?

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Are you honestly saying the mature gentlemen would have retained their podium spots doing the same training the young ladies did?

If you're working with mature gentlemen, you're working with athletes with more of a sporting background, a far greater endurance base and the training would be more specific to their needs taking into consideration their stage of development and the fact that they're racing for podium spots

The girls in the 18-24 category mentally far less developed as endurance athletes, and their endurance base is far less developed so their training would be geared towards "getting them through an Ironman"

On the other hand if you made a fairer comparison and compared the top 3 50-54 men's attitudes and their life habits to the men in the same category who are one hour slower and you'll find this is where the real difference is - it's more about attitude and life habits than it is talent or training hours 😢

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I would add that I've noted that many of the older men who I've trained with in the past simply have way more time to train that others. A lot of them may be semi-retired etc etc. Some of my older mates are able to sleep in and go do track sessions mid morning during the weekdays while I have to fit everything around work. 

 

Edited by dazmuzza

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18 minutes ago, AP said:

The girls in the 18-24 category mentally far less developed as endurance athletes, and their endurance base is far less developed so their training would be geared towards "getting them through an Ironman"

So some AGs are “special” in the sense that training to get through the IM can land you a podium spot 😉

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5 hours ago, AP said:

On the other hand if you made a fairer comparison and compared the top 3 50-54 men's attitudes and their life habits to the men in the same category who are one hour slower and you'll find this is where the real difference is - it's more about attitude and life habits than it is talent or training hours 😢

See this is where I have always had a major philosphical disagreement with you AP.

I remember getting into a massive argument back-in-the-day with Jimmy C ( a disciple of yours I believe). He would always bang on about  how anybody under 50yo could break 10hrs if "they wanted it enough". The implication being , if they didn't break 10hrs they either didn't want it enough, or they were "weak" ( physically or mentally, you take your pick).

Of course when I reminded him of the time in 2005 when he went 10:08 at IMNZ he was none too pleased. Called me a "flea", and has now taken his toys and gone to play elsewhere.

What I was trying to get across to him was that not everyone is #blessed with the same genetics . If you work at it , you can get exponentially closer TO YOUR OWN GENETIC POTENTIAL. That may be 10hrs, but it may also be 11,12,13 or heaven forbid, 14hrs.

People that can qualify for Kona anytime they so choose think that anybody can do it. They don't accept that maybe they might have a slight genetic advantage over the "everyman".

I know it's good for business to say, "Trust my teachings, and I'll get you there. Just believe" ( Very christian approach. LOL).

I think what a lot of people ( me in particular) find offensive, is the implication that if you don't podium / Kona qualify / break xhrs, it's because you're mentally weak, or if you change a few "life habits" everything will just miraculously turn you into a gun.

I call BS !

I will be doing my 20th IM next year, having started in 1999. I will be ageing up to the 60-64 AG. I averaged 15hrs per week training since Xmas 2017 , and none of it was "fluff". If I sign up to the Cycos program, do you reckon I'll be able to steal John Hill's Kona spot?

 

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Dave I think we all know AP is full of shit. 

Btw. Great post. 

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15 hours per week is easy enough to write down. The great man (AP) is correct that it is mental, ow that hurts to say. 

5 week day mornings, three bunch rides or trainer/zwift (weather) 5 hours cycling. Two runs easy on the off days, say 10 k each.

Tuesday and Thursday swim squads always hard 3000-3500 each

Lunch runs on the days not running the 10 K, 5 k each.

Weekend

Run longer 15 k

Sunday ride up to 4 hours, extend to 5 for IM prep 6 weeks out, maybe short run of the bike

Friday afternoon, longer swim 4 to 5 k

Saturday optional easy ride

 

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7 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

15 hours per week is easy enough to write down. The great man (AP) is correct that it is mental, ow that hurts to say. 

5 week day mornings, three bunch rides or trainer/zwift (weather) 5 hours cycling. Two runs easy on the off days, say 10 k each.

Tuesday and Thursday swim squads always hard 3000-3500 each

Lunch runs on the days not running the 10 K, 5 k each.

Weekend

Run longer 15 k

Sunday ride up to 4 hours, extend to 5 for IM prep 6 weeks out, maybe short run of the bike

Friday afternoon, longer swim 4 to 5 k

Saturday optional easy ride

 

So every weekday morning, 3 lunchtimes and 3 evenings. And each weekend day. 

And running 6 of 7 days, assuming no run off the bike otherwise its 7/7

No rest day? 

Edited by Turts

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6 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

15 hours per week is easy enough to write down. The great man (AP) is correct that it is mental, ow that hurts to say. 

5 week day mornings, three bunch rides or trainer/zwift (weather) 5 hours cycling. Two runs easy on the off days, say 10 k each.

Tuesday and Thursday swim squads always hard 3000-3500 each

Lunch runs on the days not running the 10 K, 5 k each.

Weekend

Run longer 15 k

Sunday ride up to 4 hours, extend to 5 for IM prep 6 weeks out, maybe short run of the bike

Friday afternoon, longer swim 4 to 5 k

Saturday optional easy ride

 

That's great if you have squad (I don't) and live close to work (I don't) and don't have to work at night (I do). I know you work PublicSector but in Private I don't have the luxury of planning lunch activity. I do get much opportunities, just can't plan them week to week (or even day to day).

I'm not saying it can't be done, as clearly it can. I'm saying it can't be done for everyone. Plus 'family time' and demands don't fit neatly into 'one day', that's not how real life works, especially coupled with a demanding corporate job. (which most of the 'tough guys'  on here would last about 10 seconds in :lol:)

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9 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

15 hours per week is easy enough to write down. The great man (AP) is correct that it is mental, ow that hurts to say. 

5 week day mornings, three bunch rides or trainer/zwift (weather) 5 hours cycling. Two runs easy on the off days, say 10 k each.

Tuesday and Thursday swim squads always hard 3000-3500 each

Lunch runs on the days not running the 10 K, 5 k each.

Weekend

Run longer 15 k

Sunday ride up to 4 hours, extend to 5 for IM prep 6 weeks out, maybe short run of the bike

Friday afternoon, longer swim 4 to 5 k

Saturday optional easy ride

 

writing down 15 hours where 1 weekend day is off, where each workout is scheduled to enable adequate recovery for the next one and thst can be done year round (wasn't that his criteria? )

I'm not a fast runner or swimmer but  your plan had me well over 15 and thats before the optional/upgrades

 

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those bunch rides can be 1 hour trainer or even zwifts, so 5 hours. And really if you are up at 5 or 430 why not do 30 minutes more aerobic exercise, filler gasp.

3 swims = 3 hours

8 hours

weekend ride 3 hours

11 hours

run 4 hours, drop some of the easier runs and don't do the options

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2 hours ago, Dave T said:

See this is where I have always had a major philosphical disagreement with you AP.

I remember getting into a massive argument back-in-the-day with Jimmy C ( a disciple of yours I believe). He would always bang on about  how anybody under 50yo could break 10hrs if "they wanted it enough". The implication being , if they didn't break 10hrs they either didn't want it enough, or they were "weak" ( physically or mentally, you take your pick).

Of course when I reminded him of the time in 2005 when he went 10:08 at IMNZ he was none too pleased. Called me a "flea", and has now taken his toys and gone to play elsewhere.

What I was trying to get across to him was that not everyone is #blessed with the same genetics . If you work at it , you can get exponentially closer TO YOUR OWN GENETIC POTENTIAL. That may be 10hrs, but it may also be 11,12,13 or heaven forbid, 14hrs.

People that can qualify for Kona anytime they so choose think that anybody can do it. They don't accept that maybe they might have a slight genetic advantage over the "everyman".

I know it's good for business to say, "Trust my teachings, and I'll get you there. Just believe" ( Very christian approach. LOL).

I think what a lot of people ( me in particular) find offensive, is the implication that if you don't podium / Kona qualify / break xhrs, it's because you're mentally weak, or if you change a few "life habits" everything will just miraculously turn you into a gun.

I call BS !

I will be doing my 20th IM next year, having started in 1999. I will be ageing up to the 60-64 AG. I averaged 15hrs per week training since Xmas 2017 , and none of it was "fluff". If I sign up to the Cycos program, do you reckon I'll be able to steal John Hill's Kona spot?

 

Can we please pin this post. Well said. 

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2 hours ago, Dave T said:

See this is where I have always had a major philosphical disagreement with you AP.

I remember getting into a massive argument back-in-the-day with Jimmy C ( a disciple of yours I believe). He would always bang on about  how anybody under 50yo could break 10hrs if "they wanted it enough". The implication being , if they didn't break 10hrs they either didn't want it enough, or they were "weak" ( physically or mentally, you take your pick).

Of course when I reminded him of the time in 2005 when he went 10:08 at IMNZ he was none too pleased. Called me a "flea", and has now taken his toys and gone to play elsewhere.

What I was trying to get across to him was that not everyone is #blessed with the same genetics . If you work at it , you can get exponentially closer TO YOUR OWN GENETIC POTENTIAL. That may be 10hrs, but it may also be 11,12,13 or heaven forbid, 14hrs.

People that can qualify for Kona anytime they so choose think that anybody can do it. They don't accept that maybe they might have a slight genetic advantage over the "everyman".

I know it's good for business to say, "Trust my teachings, and I'll get you there. Just believe" ( Very christian approach. LOL).

I think what a lot of people ( me in particular) find offensive, is the implication that if you don't podium / Kona qualify / break xhrs, it's because you're mentally weak, or if you change a few "life habits" everything will just miraculously turn you into a gun.

I call BS !

I will be doing my 20th IM next year, having started in 1999. I will be ageing up to the 60-64 AG. I averaged 15hrs per week training since Xmas 2017 , and none of it was "fluff". If I sign up to the Cycos program, do you reckon I'll be able to steal John Hill's Kona spot?

 

I think I clarified with AP that it helps if you’re in an AG where (to use his words) “training would be geared towards "getting them through an Ironman"?

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54 minutes ago, BarryBevan said:

15 hours per week is easy enough to write down. The great man (AP) is correct that it is mental, ow that hurts to say. 

5 week day mornings, three bunch rides or trainer/zwift (weather) 5 hours cycling. Two runs easy on the off days, say 10 k each.

Tuesday and Thursday swim squads always hard 3000-3500 each

Lunch runs on the days not running the 10 K, 5 k each.

Weekend

Run longer 15 k

Sunday ride up to 4 hours, extend to 5 for IM prep 6 weeks out, maybe short run of the bike

Friday afternoon, longer swim 4 to 5 k

Saturday optional easy ride

 

Train solo. Hate bunch riding. It's me and one other ...max.

Don't have the luxury of lunchtime training. But, do have the advantage of being in control of my staff's roster. 

9-5 / 8 -4 / 2 -10 / 11- 7 / variable with 1:4 weekend work and 72hr on-call.

Swimming is irrelevant ( sorry Ex-) I swim 1:01 to 1:02  regardless of whether I do 1 swim/wk or 4/wk.

Bike: my best times were 2004 - 2005 when I averaged 300km from qualifying races in August right through to race time in April/May.

Run: my best times ( 10:45....30mins off Kona Q ) was when I was doing 60k/wk in August and was periodising my training to maintain that for the next 6mths till IM Race Day.

Here's a screen cap of one of my 30k hill runs in 2008 at aerobic pace.

 

 

Capture.JPG

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