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AP

Everyone's entitled to a shocker

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Lets face it - not many of us who have done a few IM races, at any level of competition have not had a shocker of a race.

The day is so long, and so many things have to go right for that perfect race, it's no surprise that sometimes something is not going to go right 

I think if you ever have the perfect race where you actually went faster than you expected and  everything went right all day, you should retire immediately (because it's an unlikely occurrence) B)

Edited by AP

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I should have retired 2 years ago then.  Faster than expected but maybe not faster than I'm capable of? I'll keep chasing the dream though.

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2 minutes ago, AP said:

 

I think if you ever have the perfect race where you actually went faster than you expected and  everything went right all day, you should retire immediately (because it's an unlikely occurrence) B)

That's everyone's first race isn't it?  Way to kill the sport AP!

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First race was that shocker. Had no idea what an IM entailed, tried to keep up with the big boys, then walked half the run. Second time everything went right, except maybe that I had too much left at the end, but beat my expected time by 20 minutes. Third time, repeat of the first, and retired. :)

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My last IM in 2016 I had PB’s on the swim and ride. Decided in T2 not to change socks and put on my run socks as I had done previously to save some time. Biggest mistake and regret. Feet blistered so badly I couldn’t run after 5kms.Took ages for the heel damage to repair. If only......

Edited by BigRig

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Don't let one failure beat you. Turn the page and get on with this great life. Going into your first Ironman can seem like it's a huge deal and that your finish times are really important. Mentally strong people don't view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

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1 hour ago, Peter said:

Is AP getting in early for Port Mac?

excuses?

Yeah just laying a bit of a base - might give it all away and take up lawn bowls :lol:

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17 minutes ago, AP said:

Yeah just laying a bit of a base - might give it all away and take up lawn bowls :lol:

You wouldn't last 3 ends playing lawn bowls. 

Those old guys would drink you under the table. 

Land there's more than 2 people in your age group. 

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1 hour ago, Bored@work said:

Don't let one failure beat you. Turn the page and get on with this great life. Going into your first Ironman can seem like it's a huge deal and that your finish times are really important. Mentally strong people don't view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

Looks like you got your hands on AP's book then....

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3 minutes ago, Peter said:

You wouldn't last 3 ends playing lawn bowls. 

Those old guys would drink you under the table. 

Land there's more than 2 people in your age group. 

But AP does love a good bias

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11 minutes ago, Fitness Buddy said:

You turned up gave it a go.  More then me who just trains and not on strava to justify anything:D

Did u see my effort in last nights zwift race 

26190F5D-E092-41EC-AAB2-C5EA31159483.png

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Got owned in the sprint. I've seen so many people give up on their dreams at the second or third obstacle they come up against. Very often the month they walk away from their dreams is only weeks away from a real breakthrough. I have honestly seen guys give up on something when from the outside it's obvious that they are  going to achieve that goal.

I will be back racing next weeks event again.

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16 minutes ago, Fitness Buddy said:

You turned up gave it a go.  More then me who just trains and not on strava to justify anything:D

You also have no race results. 

So in theory, you just post online and watch tv. 

Last 70.3 ironman or marathon? 

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I've had only 3 races in 20 years that exceeded my wildest dreams - everything else has a been a disappointment. Chasing the race of your life is good motivation to keep going.

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A race that goes well is a beautiful thing, rare as a Pommie's bath towel though. :whistling:

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3 hours ago, The Customer said:

I've had only 3 races in 20 years that exceeded my wildest dreams - everything else has a been a disappointment. Chasing the race of your life is good motivation to keep going.

Assume all wstc races?

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7 hours ago, AP said:

Lets face it - not many of us who have done a few IM races, at any level of competition have not had a shocker of a race.

The day is so long, and so many things have to go right for that perfect race, it's no surprise that sometimes something is not going to go right 

I think if you ever have the perfect race where you actually went faster than you expected and  everything went right all day, you should retire immediately (because it's an unlikely occurrence) B)

Context?

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4 hours ago, Fitness Buddy said:

You turned up gave it a go.  More then me who just trains and not on strava to justify anything:D

"Training" implies and end goal, race, test.

As opposed to exercising. 

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29 minutes ago, Turts said:

"Training" implies and end goal, race, test.

As opposed to exercising. 

But there is nothing to say that that goal or test needs to be measured against others, or in a race. I'm not racing at the moment, but I consider what I do training. I have a number of time goals that I am aiming for, and a possible Channel swim one day, but at this point I have no real interest in racing. Would you say 4km swim squad sessions aren't "training"? The stuff FB is doing would certainly tick the boxes of "training" in my books.

 

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9 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

But there is nothing to say that that goal or test needs to be measured against others, or in a race. I'm not racing at the moment, but I consider what I do training. I have a number of time goals that I am aiming for, and a possible Channel swim one day, but at this point I have no real interest in racing. Would you say 4km swim squad sessions aren't "training"? The stuff FB is doing would certainly tick the boxes of "training" in my books.

 

Indeed.  A goal or test doesnt have to be  race. Can be a PB or such. Thats why there were commas in my post, not /

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Poor Ironpo, he had one bad race & now AP is sinking the boot. I know he disrespected the holy grail of triathlon and walked the marathon. 

I could be wrong, AP might be talking about IP's wife Rosie, but once a gain gee she was sick  and had to walk the marathon in Kona. 

I guess when you judge people on their finishing times & if they have raced Kona there isn't much room for error. 

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What I am saying is - it's pretty hard to get everything right for a race that goes all day - preparation - nutrition - execution - psychological preparation

If you do have a day when "something" goes wrong and your expected times blow out - you accept it - honestly analyse the performance - then reset your goals and training to suit - you leave it behind and move on - turn the page B)

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7 minutes ago, AP said:

If you do have a day when "something" goes wrong and your expected times blow out - you accept it - honestly analyse the performance - then reset your goals and training to suit - you leave it behind and move on - turn the page

That's what Bored@ said. Only he says it much more eloquently these days. :)

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21 hours ago, AP said:

Lets face it - not many of us who have done a few IM races, at any level of competition have not had a shocker of a race.

The day is so long, and so many things have to go right for that perfect race, it's no surprise that sometimes something is not going to go right 

I think if you ever have the perfect race where you actually went faster than you expected and  everything went right all day, you should retire immediately (because it's an unlikely occurrence) B)

25 Ironman's so far and am still looking for that perfect race. So AP, I think you have nailed it!

Ist Ironman (MMM - Sydney). 2 flat tyres...crank came off at 11Km and support vehicle had to keep putting it on  every 20-30KM (Bloody bikeshop should have replaced it), and IT went in the marathon..... pretty much hobbled all the way to Manly..................

24 races later...still going.

Edited by IronmanFoz

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27 minutes ago, AP said:

What I am saying is - it's pretty hard to get everything right for a race that goes all day - preparation - nutrition - execution - psychological preparation

If you do have a day when "something" goes wrong and your expected times blow out - you accept it - honestly analyse the performance - then reset your goals and training to suit - you leave it behind and move on - turn the page B)

Once again....nailed it. I have seen too many people over the years pull the pin because things haven't gone right....

That's life deal with it and re-evaluate.

Ironman is a constant learning curve. Its a long day and anything can happen. That's the beauty of Ironman.

Edited by IronmanFoz

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19 hours ago, Bored@work said:

Don't let one failure beat you. Turn the page and get on with this great life. Going into your first Ironman can seem like it's a huge deal and that your finish times are really important. Mentally strong people don't view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

There is no such thing as failure.....it's called feedback!

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