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Solar power, cost, installation etc etc

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7 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

What have you been running to spend $5K pa on electricity? 

Alex... don’t answer on the forum.......... 🚔👮‍♂️👮‍♀️

Edited by Steno
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On 27/10/2018 at 6:42 AM, ComfortablyNumb said:

Alex - your 11Kw system is producing 9Kw, is that right?

What have you been running to spend $5K pa on electricity?  We spend about $2K (2 people in a 4 bed house).

The 9kW was just what I happened to notice at one moment when I was standing next to the inverter.  How much it producing at any given moment depends on time of day and cloud cover.

Looking at yesterday's data, power output peaked at 9.35kW and total production for the day was 56.6kWh. I wasn't home so not sure about cloud - there must have been some about as the production trace was bouncing up and down a bit. 

QgPDBxX.png

I have 3/4 of the array facing NNE, with 1/4 facing WNW, so it's unlikely to reach a theoretical 11kW peak all that often. But it does mean the power generation curve over the day is slightly wider rather than higher. I've already adjusted the timing of pool pumps a couple of times, indeed that will be a seasonal adjustment to fire them up earlier in summer and later in winter.

We live and work from home.

I have 2 large buildings and 3 air con compressors, one a ducted system. Not usually all on at once, but when it's hot or cold two can be running. That and an older home which while it has roof insulation many elements of the design are 1970s standard when it comes to energy efficiency. Main living areas are cathedral ceilings and large single pane skylights with no way at present to shade them. Two pool pumps. 

It's also likely I'll have a new 3rd building on the property before long.

Edited by Alex Simmons

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16 hours ago, Steno said:

Alex... don’t answer on the forum.......... 🚔👮‍♂️👮‍♀️

Well, he does live in Bello .....

We always stop there for lunch on our way to our Coffs jaunts.  It has a lot more 'character' than Armidale 😉

23 minutes ago, Alex Simmons said:

The 9kW was just what I happened to notice at one moment when I was standing next to the inverter.  How much it producing at any given moment depends on time of day and cloud cover.

Looking at yesterday's data, power output peaked at 9.35kW and total production for the day was 56.6kWh. I wasn't home so not sure about cloud - there must have been some about as the production trace was bouncing up and down a bit. 

QgPDBxX.png

I have 3/4 of the array facing NNE, with 1/4 facing WNW, so it's unlikely to reach a theoretical 11kW peak all that often. But it does mean the power generation curve over the day is slightly wider rather than higher. I've already adjusted the timing of pool pumps a couple of times, indeed that will be a seasonal adjustment to fire them up earlier in summer and later in winter.

We live and work from home.

I have 2 large buildings and 3 air con compressors, one a ducted system. Not usually all on at once, but when it's hot or cold two can be running. That and an older home which while it has roof insulation many elements of the design are 1970s standard when it comes to energy efficiency. Main living areas are cathedral ceilings and large single pane skylights with no way at present to shade them. Two pool pumps. 

It's also likely I'll have a new 3rd building on the property before long.

Makes sense for you to have solar with all that electricity use during the day.  It's a bit borderline for us because we don't use much, and most use is in evenings when we are home.  Insulation/house design is a big issue.  I was amazed at how much warmer/cooler our 2012 built house with modern insulation standards is compared to our old 80's house.  Both brick veneer, but a huge difference in thermal efficiency.

 

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I did my financial projections with an assumption of an average of 60% of our power being supplied by our solar array, which given we are at home during the day I think is reasonably attainable but I won't really know until I have collected data over a longer period.

The higher that number is, the shorter the payback period and the greater the internal rate of return. At 60% it is an excellent investment, certainly way way better than any regular financial instrument can return.

Time (and future bills) will tell.

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3 hours ago, Alex Simmons said:

I did my financial projections with an assumption of an average of 60% of our power being supplied by our solar array, which given we are at home during the day I think is reasonably attainable but I won't really know until I have collected data over a longer period.

The higher that number is, the shorter the payback period and the greater the internal rate of return. At 60% it is an excellent investment, certainly way way better than any regular financial instrument can return.

Time (and future bills) will tell.

Agree.  I analysed the payback for a host of commercial businesses in our region and the payback ranged from 2-7yrs, but even at 7yrs it was a good investment.  Some of these also incurred peak load charges which really hurt (up to 40% of their bill), because they put such a load on the grid.  A few installed in banks of capacitors which smooth the load & saved heaps.

 

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Having a system that tracks all the data makes it pretty cool.

I've worked out all the factors (daily connection fee, grid power charges, off peak hot water circuit, feed in tariff, GST, applicable discounts) to do a like for like comparison.

Bottom line: so far my power bill for the opening 4 days would have been $44.96, but will now be $4.80.
That's one sunny day, two overcast days and one rainy day.

We have a few warm to hot sunny days coming up so will report back after a full week.

 

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6 hours ago, Alex Simmons said:

 

Bottom line: so far my power bill for the opening 4 days would have been $44.96, but will now be $4.80.
That's one sunny day, two overcast days and one rainy day.

 

 

So after 2 years you should be able to buy a new bike

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12 hours ago, Cottoneyes said:

So after 2 years you should be able to buy a new bike

Ha! 

Seriously though, keep in mind the upfront capital investment has to be recovered and financial benefits need to exceed that for alternatives uses of the money*. Which is why my assessment used an IRR approach which factored in the lost opportunity of an investment return for an alternative use of the funds (or in the case for some people, the cost of borrowing money to pay for it).

Obviously I need a full year to have a much more solid assessment of the returns.

For long term projections I also considered long term factors, such as the very gradual decline in performance of the system, the prospects for grid energy prices and so on. Some are relatively easy to predict, others less so.

If anyone is considering a system, I'd be happy to work through some numbers. Of the 3 companies that I had quote for our system, only one provided an assessment of financial benefits. But I considered their model to use some rather optimistic assumptions. So I built my own.

 

* of course some may wish to spend the money because of the less tangible environmental benefits, mostly the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. I'm assessing from a purely $ perspective since when push comes to shove, this is what will drive most households.

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Thought I'd post an update.

My first post solar PV installation quarterly bill came last week, although it was a month behind the billing period for some reason (11 Oct 2018 to 8 Jan 2019).

It covers two periods:
- before (40 days) and
- after (50 days) 
the installation of the electricity distributor's smart meter (previously I had old spinning disk meters).

For this quarter I had solar PV system in place for 74 of the 90 days.

It reduced my electricity bill by ~$890 or nearly $12/day.

Before:

The 40 days prior to smart meter installation had 16 days with no solar PV and 24 days with solar PV installed. During those 24 days I was playing a game of turning the solar PV system on and off so as not to run the old disk meters below their last meter reading. This was a bit of a challenge as it's 3-phase, so while I managed to only record a net of just 13kWh on one meter for those 40 days, the other two meters I wasn't able to keep quite so low as it was that one meter I had to keep my eye on.

I can't precisely calculate the saving during this period but if I base it on my average daily usage for the same quarter last year, then in that 24 days alone I saved about $330 ($13.75/day) since I was effectively getting full import price for my feed in tariff.

After:
The saving for the next 50 days once the smart metering was installed was $556.67, or $11.13/day

In the time since the smart meter was officially commissioned, these are my average daily savings by month:

Nov: $10.14/day
Dec: $11.03/day
Jan: $12.29/day
Feb: $11.26/day

Overall so far I'm saving: $11.41/day.

That suggests a rapid 3.3 year payback but I expect those daily savings numbers to drop over winter time.

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One of things I did with the solar set up was to install my own smart meter so I could have access to detailed data about my energy flows: total consumption, total production, total grid imports and exports. It also keeps a whole range of other performance data about the system.

I have this data in 5-minute intervals.

My intent was to use the detail on our actual energy flows to be able to assess after the first full year what other savings opportunities existed on the supply side of the equation (since one can always looks for ways to lower energy demand as well).

e.g. am I better off moving to a Time Of Use plan? What would be the impact of having a battery?

So I built a model to analyse flat rate plans and TOU options, and also to simulate how a battery works. It uses all the battery specifications and energy flow logic a battery uses wrt charging and discharging. 

Given I only have less than 3 months of data, I'm not drawing any strong conclusions yet on TOU plans.

But it suggests to me that being on a TOU plan would be very beneficial over summer (an extra $1.84/day saving over my flat rate plan). As to how such a TOU plan might perform over the rest of the year, I'll have to wait to find out.

And the battery simulator works really well. It also tells me it'd be a lousy investment, at least for summertime.

Over this summer period a Powerwall 2 would only lower my power bill by another $0.68/day. An annualised saving of ~$250. Hardly see the point for something that costs $13.5k to install!

Will review as the seasons progress.

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2 hours ago, nealo said:

Hey Alex how much was the smart meter? 

It wasn't separately itemised price on the quote/invoice. In some cases the meters are part of the bundle.

It's the 3-phase version of the Fronius meter so they are usually around $650 or so installed I think, but that's when done as separate install - whereas mine was done at same time as everything else so presumably that reduces the cost a bit (sparky already here, board wiring already being modified to suit, inverter settings adjusted etc). The single phase one is cheaper, about $350 I think.

When I look at the data and modelling I'm doing, the decisions it enables means it will pay for itself in under 2 years.

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Wow :o 

The retailer you go with in regards to your supply (in therefore who pays you for your feed in) makes a massive difference.

For me Supply varies from $0.22869 to $0.4213 per kWh

and FIT varies from $0.061 to $0.200

And obviously the company charging $0.22869 aren't paying you $0.200

This can make a massive difference to your bill.

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Bugger solar now, of be happy to just have done different supplier options.  I know my wife looked at it a while ago, but I did one of those online site things the other day.  Could save over 25% switching to a different company.  But while the site showed me options based on my location, every time I went to the providers own site they couldn't supply to my location.  What a load of bubkiss, getting my hopes up like that.

A whole stack of other houses or my way have recently gotten solar.  It's almost like Oprah went down a street and said "you get solar, they get solar, every one gets solar!"

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If you have a reasonable amount of north-ish facing mostly unshaded roof space in Australia, and you expect to be in your home for many years to come, then the excellent financial benefit of installing solar PV is almost a lay down misère. Obviously every individual case on its merits but as an investment its ROI is very hard to beat.

Of course doing the shopping around for a good deal on energy costs is also a worthwhile exercise. Use the comparison sites, find the options then talk with your current supplier. As a rule of thumb they will seek to keep you with a better offer. It may not match an offer you find, but you are still going to be paying less.

Edited by Alex Simmons

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7 hours ago, nealo said:

This can make a massive difference to your bill.

It's why having the data on your energy flow patterns really helps.

If you have a distributor's smart meter installed (common in some states, less so in others) then the data is available upon request from your retailer or from your network service distributor. They must provide it under law.

If you don't have such a meter (it's pretty much a requirement if you have grid connected solar), then at least have the aggregate energy use data from your electricity bills over a year or two. That's at least sufficient to work out what the likely benefits are.

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7 hours ago, goughy said:

A whole stack of other houses or my way have recently gotten solar.  It's almost like Oprah went down a street and said "you get solar, they get solar, every one gets solar!"

This may indeed end up being a problem for those late to the party.

As more solar is installed in a local area, the network service provider will likely begin to limit the size of new systems they will permit and reduce the export limit for new systems. In order to cater for the expansion of generation capacity in a local area, they may be required to invest in upgrades to transmission lines and especially to transformers. Something they may not want to spend money on. Easier to just cap the problem.

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1 hour ago, Alex Simmons said:

Use the comparison sites, find the options then talk with your current supplier. As a rule of thumb they will seek to keep you with a better offer. It may not match an offer you find, but you are still going to be paying less.

I did that last year. My supplier couldn't match it, so I swapped. The new retailer does all the paperwork & sends it to your old one. The old one then contacted me to make an even better offer (that they couldn't up front) to keep me, so I stayed. I'm in the middle of that process at the moment, waiting for the counter-offer.

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I noticed that if I spray my garden hose on the panels in the peak of a sunny and (very) hot day i see a about a 20% increase in PV current - not sure for how long etc but I was wondering if anyone else has tried this?  I know that (obviously) if the panels have dirt or dust on them this maybe the reason, but I also understand that the panel's performance decreases with temperature so maybe it is the cooling effect?

Is it worth putting a little sprinkler system up there?

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How old are your panels?  I've been told by an installer the more modern ones are self cleaning and we should not need to do anything.  Personally My BS meter is a bit on alert over that one, no idea how a panel could remove dust without water or ash as we've had falling on ours from the recent fires around us

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8 hours ago, Pete said:

I noticed that if I spray my garden hose on the panels in the peak of a sunny and (very) hot day i see a about a 20% increase in PV current - not sure for how long etc but I was wondering if anyone else has tried this?  I know that (obviously) if the panels have dirt or dust on them this maybe the reason, but I also understand that the panel's performance decreases with temperature so maybe it is the cooling effect?

Is it worth putting a little sprinkler system up there?

Panels definitely have a decline in performance in the heat. They are designed to operate at an optimum temperature (usually around 25ᵒC - panel temp that is, not air temp), and then as the panel itself gets hotter the output declines. This temperature coefficient is typically in the order of 0.5% per ᵒC. It will be part of the specification of the panel. Panels on the roof in full sun can easily be 65ᵒC.

Cooling the panel will see an increase in output and as you note it can be significant.

This is why sunny cool days can result in higher peak outputs that hot summer days.

I would be careful though in applying water to cause a sudden temperature changes to panels, there is the potential to cause micro cracking damage with rapid contraction of materials. This typically isn't an issue with rain because cloud cover already takes the heat out before rain does.

That said, there are a few who have set up watering systems for their solar PV systems - usually via a misting application and a closed water system (tank water return via gutter) and pump. They figure that for some hours the increase in PV output far outweighs the cost of running the pump. It'd take a while though to recover the expense of set up and you'd want it to have some intelligence built in to assess when it's worthwhile running.

If you have the roof space, it's far easier and cheaper just to put a few more panels on. That's the thing with solar PV, making up for inefficiencies with extra panels is typically the best way.

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3 hours ago, Cottoneyes said:

How old are your panels?  I've been told by an installer the more modern ones are self cleaning and we should not need to do anything.  Personally My BS meter is a bit on alert over that one, no idea how a panel could remove dust without water or ash as we've had falling on ours from the recent fires around us

They will self clean with rain, provided they are not flat. Sure there may be some stuff that sticks a bit more (e.g. bird shit) and might need a clean.

If you really have had a bad dust storm or smoke, and it hasn't rained for a long time then perhaps a spray with the hose is worthwhile but that's about it.

If you have tree sap or debris (or bird shit from a perch spot), get the tree lopped.

Be careful about heading up onto a roof, especially if you intend to use water up there. It can get very slippery and dangerous. Also I would suggest turning both the inverter and the DC isolator switches off just in case (if you operate a DC string inverter).

A check each year to make sure everything is safe 'n' sound is worth doing.

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Not sure about Oz but plenty of stories over about homeowners that couldn't afford the initial outlay for solar and took up a lease option.   A lot of these owners are now trapped when it comes to selling their house, as new buyers won't take over he lease and the sellers can't afford to pay it out and the lease T&Cs  (which few actually read) bar you from selling the home until it's settled.

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4 hours ago, FatPom said:

Not sure about Oz but plenty of stories over about homeowners that couldn't afford the initial outlay for solar and took up a lease option.   A lot of these owners are now trapped when it comes to selling their house, as new buyers won't take over he lease and the sellers can't afford to pay it out and the lease T&Cs  (which few actually read) bar you from selling the home until it's settled.

People sell cars all the time with leases or loans still hanging over them, surely common sense would allow the settlement to be made from the purchase price as part of the final conveyancing just like outstanding rates or mortgages

Or maybe Aussies are just more forward thinking than the Poms (runs away and hides...)

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On 06/03/2019 at 6:58 PM, Cottoneyes said:

People sell cars all the time with leases or loans still hanging over them, surely common sense would allow the settlement to be made from the purchase price as part of the final conveyancing just like outstanding rates or mortgages

Or maybe Aussies are just more forward thinking than the Poms (runs away and hides...)

Not sure the ins and outs, I'll look it up but it sounds like a paperwork nightmare. You're right about the Poms, that's why I always race for Oz :lol:

 

here it is:

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/nov/25/homeowners-trapped-solar-panels

 

 

Edited by FatPom

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In regards to the cleaning of the panels, Our panel were already on the house when we moved in about 5 years ago so I think they are 7-8 years old, I've never cleaned them but check them every 12 months or so, just run a finger over them to see if they are covered in dust, and they are always clean. Very unscientific but gives me a peace of mind that i don't have to worry about trying to clean them, 2 story house I'm not a big fan of being on the roof

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Solar leasing is not all that popular in Australia. It really only emerged as an option in last couple of years but uptake is uncommon.

Probably because installation costs here are typically far far lower than in the UK or USA and so people opt to purchase outright.

Solar installation costs in the UK are about triple per kW than in Australia and in the USA they are about double that of Australia. It's one of the very few technologies where we don't pay the living in Australia tax.

People here either pay up front from their own savings or they arrange their own finance. Some take up finance offers offered by installers but these are essentially straight out loans, not leases and are not tied to the property title.

Interestingly, the rate of solar PV installation in Australia is highest in the poorer areas.

If anyone is considering a lease, please be aware that come time to sell a home it is likely the lease will be considered a liability on the home. In Australia the payback times on Solar PV installations are so good that a lease is unnecessary. Leasing is more likely an option for a commercial operation to preserve working capital.

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There are scientific tests done to assess the impact of cleaning v not cleaning - it's something solar farms do. When you have hundreds of thousands of solar panels, working out the cost-benefit of cleaning matters to the bottom line.

Correctly installed, the benefits of cleaning domestic solar PV typically doesn't make up for the cost/risk. Obviously there can be one-off circumstances where that's not the case or if you happen to live somewhere grime accumulates more quickly (near major roads or other sources of pollution, have trees overhanging, bats or birds crapping, live in a dusty area) and rain is infrequent. Sometimes those with salt spray also might need to do the off extra clean but again rain usually does the job.

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Just do the numbers. With general dust or grime (most of which rain deals with), panel output may be 1% lower. That's the typical impact reported in the scientific literature.

So for a decent sized 6.6kW system you might lose 70-100kWh of production over a year. That's ~ $20-$30 worth of power. Or $10 worth of exports.

So are you going to pay someone a couple of hundred bucks to clean them or risk your neck for a $20 gain?

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2 minutes ago, Alex Simmons said:

Just do the numbers. With general dust or grime (most of which rain deals with), panel output may be 1% lower. That's the typical impact reported in the scientific literature.

So for a decent sized 6.6kW system you might lose 70-100kWh of production over a year. That's ~ $20-$30 worth of power. Or $10 worth of exports.

So are you going to pay someone a couple of hundred bucks to clean them or risk your neck for a $20 gain?

I get up twice a year to clean mine. I just use the hose & one of those wide flat microfibre mops. One of the main reasons is the mould/lichen I get on the aluminium border that is visible from the ground, so looks bad. We also get a lot of dust out here, so figure it doesn't hurt.

I used to work with riggers climbing TV/Radio towers, so heights don't phase me, and I know how to get around a roof safely. It takes about 30 minutes to do, so I just do it early before it gets hot, then forget about it till next time I see them looking dirty.

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The nature of my roof means I'm also able to get up there on occasions. Usually it's to blow out any leaf litter in the gutters. Cleaning panels I'm not so sure as once there is water about it gets a whole lot more dangerous. It may be OK as I can just stay on the flatter part of the roof over our eaves but with a prosthetic leg I have less chance to catch myself if I lose balance the wrong way or slip with the wrong foot.

Where we live we get a reasonable frequency of rain.

Something I'll keep an eye on.

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On 05/03/2019 at 9:46 PM, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I did that last year. My supplier couldn't match it, so I swapped. The new retailer does all the paperwork & sends it to your old one. The old one then contacted me to make an even better offer (that they couldn't up front) to keep me, so I stayed. I'm in the middle of that process at the moment, waiting for the counter-offer.

Well, I did the swap to save about $300 on what Origin were going to revert me back to after me contract ended. Before I did it I rang them to ask if they could improve their offer, and the guy was honest with me. He said "sorry we can't, but if you go ahead and churn, our retention group will probably contact you and offer you a better deal". Well, that's exactly what happened, and the deal they offered saved about $100 on the Energy Australia deal. 

So while cancelling with them, they came back with yet another offer, but couldn't quite match Origin. Really though, what a ridiculous system, where they show no reward for loyalty, but simply go the extra mile for winback. It just creates extra work for them, for the other retailer, and for me.

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As is my way, I've got this all charted:

qHHbu7S.png

Chart shows the cumulative costs for electricity since the retailer's smart meter was installed.

The top dark section is what we would have paid without the solar PV system.

The next lighter section is what we pay now.

Beneath that are two more lines. The dashed line is what we would pay if we were on a Time Of Use plan rather than out current flat rate plan.

The bottom dotted line is what we would have paid if we also had a battery installed, with a Powerwall 2 specification.

What this shows is the very big impact solar PV is having, the additional benefit of having the data to assess the best plan option (i.e. swapping over to TOU plan) and the lousy return provided by a battery.

At that rate and current costs (NSW) a battery has a payback period of more than 50 years.

The solar PV on the other hand is on track to be paid back in under 4 years.

Gotta love power meters!

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I don't get this whole solar power caper. So let me get this right-you spend a heap of money installing infrastructure so that the power company can by electricity for a fraction of the cost that they then sell it back to you for? 

Seems like a con job to me...

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21 minutes ago, more said:

I don't get this whole solar power caper. So let me get this right-you spend a heap of money installing infrastructure so that the power company can by electricity for a fraction of the cost that they then sell it back to you for? 

Seems like a con job to me...

Actually, I pay them 19c per kWh, and they buy it off me for 16c per kWh. That's not too bad.

The real winners were those in Qld who got in before the state Gov dropped the extra tariff. They get over 50c per kWh, so they would be stupid to install a battery, unless of course they set it up to charge at night & feed it back into the grid during the day.

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39 minutes ago, more said:

I don't get this whole solar power caper. So let me get this right-you spend a heap of money installing infrastructure so that the power company can by electricity for a fraction of the cost that they then sell it back to you for? 

Seems like a con job to me...

At the moment you are paying them to “store” it for you if you don’t have your own batteries.

solar electricity is generated during the day but we want to mostly use it at night, so the difference is you paying for their storage infrastructure. 

 

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1 hour ago, more said:

I don't get this whole solar power caper. So let me get this right-you spend a heap of money installing infrastructure so that the power company can by electricity for a fraction of the cost that they then sell it back to you for?

No, you generate and use your own power which means you use much less of the electricity the retailer would have sold you, and any excess production you sell to the retailer.

Over the lifetime of a solar PV system the cost of the energy you generate is around 3 to 4 cents per kWh.

So for each kWh you produce, you do two things:

i. use some of it to power your home, instead of paying the retailer 20-35c/kWh, and/or

ii. export the balance and get paid between 8 to 20c/kWh.

Either way you are making a superb return. There are very few investments out there that can compete with the returns a domestic solar PV system can provide, especially if you are fortunate to have suitable roof space and orientation.

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4 minutes ago, Alex Simmons said:

Either way you are making a superb return. There are very few investments out there that can compete with the returns a domestic solar PV system can provide, especially if you are fortunate to have suitable roof space and orientation.

We use a shitload of power. There is someone home most of the time & the aircon is on through most of Summer. We feed back less than half of what we generate, and we got paid around $800 for what we did feed back. That means the system gives us a benefit of around $2,000 per year. For a $7,500 investment, that's a good return.

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4 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Well, I did the swap to save about $300 on what Origin were going to revert me back to after me contract ended. Before I did it I rang them to ask if they could improve their offer, and the guy was honest with me. He said "sorry we can't, but if you go ahead and churn, our retention group will probably contact you and offer you a better deal". Well, that's exactly what happened, and the deal they offered saved about $100 on the Energy Australia deal. 

So while cancelling with them, they came back with yet another offer, but couldn't quite match Origin. Really though, what a ridiculous system, where they show no reward for loyalty, but simply go the extra mile for winback. It just creates extra work for them, for the other retailer, and for me.

At least you could ship around!  There has been a stand in my local shopping centre by the govt to help explain all this electricity stuff.  They confirmed for me that Toowoomba and it's surrounds only have one option for their power; either Energex or Ergon depending on where you live!  He was just there because so many people are getting confused.

I wonder why they get confused?  A month ago I went to one of those online sites and found umpteen options for power which would reduce my bill by up to $300/quarter.  And I had to enter my address etc for them to find options available to me!  Then when I went to each companies own site I was eventually told it wasn't available to me.  Way to piss people off!  They had my address, and just wasted my time!

I pointed this out to the guy at the stand, and he agreed that that sorry of thing is confusing it all for people.  He said while I have no other option for power, I should still trying Ergon and ask them for a better deal?  With zero competition, why exactly would they offer a better deal?

The only good thing to come out of it was finding out that Google's spam call screening works a treat, because I've supposedly been getting called ad nauseum since going to that power site but all the calls are getting filtered out.  So, can I call that a win???

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14 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

We use a shitload of power. There is someone home most of the time & the aircon is on through most of Summer. We feed back less than half of what we generate, and we got paid around $800 for what we did feed back. That means the system gives us a benefit of around $2,000 per year. For a $7,500 investment, that's a good return.

2000/7500 = 27% ROI

Ain't many investments out there that are nearly as good. And consider this is saving you after tax expenditure, which makes it even more valuable.

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Ok so my solar went in last Tuesday, the Fronius Smart Meter on Saturday.

Still waiting for my grid meter to be updated or replaced.

I've had the system on and can confirm it's not making the Grid Meter go backwards like the old meters as mine is digital but it also doesn't charge me for using the Solar's production as reported by some people.

So it is wort having turned on, it's saving me 8-10kw a day.

Now I may not be around to turn it off when they turn up to replace the meter, will it be an issue do you think if they find it turned on?

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6 hours ago, nealo said:

Now I may not be around to turn it off when they turn up to replace the meter, will it be an issue do you think if they find it turned on?

Turn it off night before they arrive.

It's not meant to be on, so best to ensure it's off.

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6 hours ago, nealo said:

Ok so my solar went in last Tuesday, the Fronius Smart Meter on Saturday.

What system spec did you end up with?

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15 hours ago, Alex Simmons said:

What system spec did you end up with?

17 300W Jinko panels

5kw Fronius Symo inverter + smart meter

The rear of my house faces North and 17 panels is all they can fit on. I've got heaps more roof space East and West but they have massive shading issues.

 

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2 hours ago, nealo said:

17 300W Jinko panels

5kw Fronius Symo inverter + smart meter

The rear of my house faces North and 17 panels is all they can fit on. I've got heaps more roof space East and West but they have massive shading issues.

 

Cool. Yeah having a lot of shading is an issue, and to get value from such areas requires adding optimisers or micro inverters. Or tree lopping!

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1 hour ago, Alex Simmons said:

Cool. Yeah having a lot of shading is an issue, and to get value from such areas requires adding optimisers or micro inverters. Or tree lopping!

But shading on the roof does lower your A/C costs. We noticed that at our last house. Once the trees grew back to shade the roof, the house didn't get as hot. And that was with sarking under the sheets and pumped in insulation on the ceiling.

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I just had 22 300w panels (6.6kw) installed and a 5k inverter. The Vic gov have a big rebate going so it will only cost me $2000 after the 50% rebate. Hard to say no to that!  

Edited by dazaau

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