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The Customer

The Expat weather thread

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More training related but I seem more at home in the Sandbox these days - For those who travel around a bit, what's easier - training in extreme heat or bitter cold?

I've just done 4 years in the Middle East and must say, the Summers are oppressive. There's really only 3 months where I find the temperature great for training, the rest of the year, every day is a challenge to beat the heat. We get several months of mid to high 40's day-after-day. It regularly gets to 50. Even Autumn and Spring are mid to high 30s. One challenge is finding a pool cool and big enough to swim in and forget the sea in the summer - you start to cook after 15mins. Running is the most difficult though - the treadmill becomes your only option as running outdoors is slow with health risks.

I have not had to train through a proper white Winter but like the idea of working in Europe and having 4 proper seasons. Rugging up and going for a run seems to be appealing right now.

Has anyone done both? ie. worked and trained in a blistering environment plus done the same in sub zero. What is easier to manage, extreme hot or cold?

Edited by The Customer

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As the Norwegians say, there's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing choices.  Much easier to train/race in the cold and wet than it is in the heat.  Whilst Brisbane isn't the middle east I've got to say I'm totally over the summers here - regularly trained twice a day when we were in Melbourne but coming up here that second training session just becomes a survival one to the point I've stopped doing them.  We ski a fair bit and have regularly been out there when it's -20c or a bit colder without too many problems. 

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3 hours ago, The Customer said:

More training related but I seem more at home in the Sandbox these days - For those who travel around a bit, what's easier - training in extreme heat or bitter cold?

Has anyone done both? ie. worked and trained in a blistering environment plus done the same in sub zero. What is easier to manage, extreme hot or cold?

Well for me, Oz qualifies as blistering, so I'm going to say I'm qualified to comment.

On a temp basis, the cold (or colder) is easier to handle for sure. Having said that, those crisp clear 5C days are few and far between. The reality (at least in UK and Benelux area) is wet, low light, constantly muddy and potholes roads and A LOT of bike cleaning.  A 2 hr wet winter ride is a 4hr commitment if you include cleaning.

I'm amazed at some of the commitment of the UK iron athletes, it can be really tricky.

Now, if you're comparing a clean dry environment to a clean wet/cold environment (like Oz), that's a different story.  I'd say I've bailed more sessions in Oz due to heat than I have here due to cold.

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FP, bike cleaning in the ME is at a new level for me. It's the sand. One ride and it's like your drive train is running through sandpaper. Here I clean my chain every weekend. In Australia bike cleaning was done after several months.

The heat in Aus is nothing compared to this. Really hard to describe but to give you an idea, wouldn't dare leaving anything in the car, from bikes to runners. Everything dries out and crumbles.

There are some pretty tough and fast Scottish athletes - surely they find a way to get out in the Winter.

Edited by The Customer
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I lived in Qatar for 5 years and yeah the summers were unbelievable, 46, 47 everyday for months. Our local outdoor pool was specially cooled, otherwise it would have been like a spa. No way you could run in that heat.

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It's Christmas Day, well into Winter and my long run was done in 25 degrees at 10am. No wind, no shade so it felt more like 30. Only 2 months left of this cold snap and the temperature climbs back up very rapidly.

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2 hours ago, The Customer said:

FP, bike cleaning in the ME is at a new level for me. It's the sand. One ride and it's like your drive train is running through sandpaper. Here I clean my chain every weekend. In Australia bike cleaning was done after several months.

The heat in Aus is nothing compared to this. Really hard to describe but to give you an idea, wouldn't dare leaving anything in the car, from bikes to runners. Everything dries out and crumbles.

There are some pretty tough and fast Scottish athletes - surely they find a way to get out in the Winter.

I'm not talking just drive chain, that's the easy bit. The repeated cleanining of clogged up frozen mud on all moving parts,  brake calipers etc plus your riding kit, that's proper cleaning and it's usually done when you are still cold Like I say, the heat in Oz is relative to me, it fcukin hot,  it's no different to when Aussies think that it's cold.

You need to read the post again, I'm not saying training doesn't happen in winter here, as clearly it does but there is a lot more to training effectively in a wet/cold winter than ' rugging up'. The mud and corrosive salt gets into everything.

 

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just stop training and get fat. worked for me. 

 

On topic, above 35 degrees things get difficult. Above 40 hard. Above 45 it's survival. 

 

I ski most years and in minus+++ I still sweat with the right clothing. There are no clothes that can cool you in Middle East conditions. 

 

I would much prefer to train in hills, in rain, near freezing than what the desert throws up. 

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Haven't had to deal with the extremes that you guys are talking about, but I'm a fair weather athlete and don't tend to train in the cold & rain etc, so would always take the warmer climate.  Plus I'm only a small bloke so naturally take the heat better than the bigger guys.  My race results would suggest the same with my quickest IM being a really warm one in Cairns, and my fastest Marathon being part of the IM in Kona.

I also tend to think that the heat doesn't effect you as much when you are fitter, yet the same warm conditions can knock the bejeezes out of you if you are unfit.  Maybe it's time that I headed to the South Pole to train for a bit!

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13 hours ago, truck said:

As the Norwegians say, there's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing choices.  Much easier to train/race in the cold and wet than it is in the heat.  Whilst Brisbane isn't the middle east I've got to say I'm totally over the summers here - regularly trained twice a day when we were in Melbourne but coming up here that second training session just becomes a survival one to the point I've stopped doing them.  We ski a fair bit and have regularly been out there when it's -20c or a bit colder without too many problems. 

The human body isn't designed to operate at extremes either way. I've skied -32 in Tremblant and it was ****ing ridiculous. You could keep adding layers and still be good for one run and then come in unless you had heated boots. We were the only ones out as locals have the luxury of staying in until its warm at -10

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The northern winter with black ice, snow then sludge, sleet, fog & cold cold rain can make riding dangerous & no fun at all. Running is ok, you can  stay warmer. Dense fog can make the drive to the pool very unpleasant & the short amount of daylight can also add to the juggle  but I find  high temperatures &  humidity smash me & I never race well 

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19 hours ago, The Customer said:

It's Christmas Day, well into Winter and my long run was done in 25 degrees at 10am. No wind, no shade so it felt more like 30. Only 2 months left of this cold snap and the temperature climbs back up very rapidly.

What country are you in? Bahrain?

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I trained for IM Canada (Whistler) an at altitude, cold, hilly race, while working in Doha, Qatar, dead flat, insanely hot and as close to sea level as you can get without getting wet.

Result: personal worst. but I had great fun. It was Angus’ first outing in an Ironman.

I prefer the heat, but the Middle East is just ridiculous. Running outside with a bladder pack during Ramadan was an exciting risk 😳Brisbane is ideal. 

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All you 'just rug up' types,  nip on over here today and test your theory out :wink3:

 

I much prefer cold, but there is a world of difference between a Wham Xmas video and 'reality'. :lol:

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On 25/12/2017 at 9:33 PM, Parkside said:

The human body isn't designed to operate at extremes either way. I've skied -32 in Tremblant and it was ****ing ridiculous. You could keep adding layers and still be good for one run and then come in unless you had heated boots. We were the only ones out as locals have the luxury of staying in until its warm at -10

I’ve done -35C for a XC ski race and there’s no messing around. It’s dangerous right from the off! Once you’re moving, you keep moving and keep feeding. Once you’re finished, you have to immediately get into dry clothing as wet clothing will freeze up and can send you into thermic shock - remembering to do that when you’re spent takes some doing...

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3 hours ago, Rimmer said:

I’ve done -35C for a XC ski race and there’s no messing around. It’s dangerous right from the off! Once you’re moving, you keep moving and keep feeding. Once you’re finished, you have to immediately get into dry clothing as wet clothing will freeze up and can send you into thermic shock - remembering to do that when you’re spent takes some doing...

Just what I want to hear as I move closer to confirming a channel swim. The dam is OK at the moment, but a couple months ago I swam for 2 hours, got out, dried, hopped into a heated car with seat heaters turned on, then when I got out at the local shop 20 minutes later I started shivering and didn't stop for over an hour.

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31 minutes ago, Tyno said:

Yeah, but you hadn't smeared yourself in pig fat either.

That will make all the difference :)

Couldn't I just eat a lot of pork & crackling, & get the pig fat on the inside?

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-6C this morning, -4 one hour later at work.  Blue sky day but you'll need spiked tyres on the quieter roads.

Edited by FatPom

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10 minutes ago, The Customer said:

Tell me about black ice. What happens if you ride over a patch of black ice?

If you get away with it lightly,  your view of the world becomes sideways and you don't feel the road rash until you get in the shower later! :crybaby:

 

if you don't get away with it lightly, you wake up in hospital, surrounded by loved ones and try to supress that first question out of your mouth being about your bike.:lol:

 

Seriously, black ice is no joke, you just cannot see it. It's like a highside on a moto,  it's happened before your brain can register it.

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I suppose it's a lot like diesel on a damp road (only worse). You don't really see it, your wheels have ABSOLUTELY no grip, and the first you realise it is when the front wheel just falls out from under you.

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19 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I suppose it's a lot like diesel on a damp road (only worse). You don't really see it, your wheels have ABSOLUTELY no grip, and the first you realise it is when the front wheel just falls out from under you.

Pretty much, except you can sometimes see diesel in the wet as it has a rainbow effect. Black ice is near invisible (it's not black, it's crystal clear)

Edited by FatPom

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