Jump to content
goughy

First car for daughter

Recommended Posts

So, I know pretty much nothing about cars. But we're starting to browse around for our daughters first car. She's been saving, plus grandparents and us, I reckon there'll be around 7k to spend. Now, she really only wants a Honda Jazz (Jas in a Jazz), which I don't really have an issue with, but what else is really worth a gander at?  My main consideration with the Jazz is that to get something not too old we are looking at the 1.3ltr models. Is that really a problem, that small an engine, or should we go older to get a 1.5ltr?  Obviously has to be manual since she doesn't want to learn to drive in my HiAce Commuter, even though I told her if she can drive that she can drive anything!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to take the Mother in Law car shopping earlier this year, the Honda Jazz was my favourite out of the cars we looked at (note we were looking at new cars).  The new cars the engine was fine, she won't get into trouble, and has enough pick up to keep her happy.  We also test drove the Toyota Echo, Mazda 2, Holden Berlina. 

Originally we got the Toyota Echo against my advice ( I've seen the Echo in an accident and wondered how anyone survived, was sandwiched rear and front in a 3 car accident, it seriously looked like something out of a Road Runner cartoon).  3 weeks later a truck in front of her lost it's tow bar which she ran over and the car was a write off due to damage underneath.  So back to shopping, but this time she said she didn't really like the Echo and wanted to get something else.

The Mazda 2 ended up being brought second time around, goes okay but I find the new models have a massive blind spot from the rear pillars and not a fan of the small rear window either. Berlina was a surprise, much better than the old cars I did a driving test in 25 years ago and spent the whole hour swearing about the lack of guts in the car, would be my second choice in that size car.  Suzuki ignis is another option, bit small for us so we didn't test drive but they are very basic so less to go wrong with them.  Zero boot space though which may be a factor against them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After our youngest daughter wrote off her first car (2002 Camry) by doing aqua-ballet along the Kings Highway (big lesson learned there), I got her a 2012 Yaris (1.5L) with 102,000kms on it from the Tamworth Pickles Auctions at a fixed price of $8,700.  Frankly, I find it a little harsh in the suspension (the old Camry was a dream to drive) but she loves it, and it has been a great car doing many long trips (6hrs+), is perfect for zipping around Sydney and uses v little fuel.  I suspect a Mazda 2 might ride a bit better, and would seriously look at one of those should our eldest daughter ever need a car...or have the $'s to put petrol in it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Safety is my biggest priority, reliability, then way down the list is performance, cool factor etc. As long as it has the highest ANCAP rating and will get her to and from school, Uni, work etc.

I handed down my 2012 VW Golf hatch, absolute base model petrol manual to my eldest in January when she got her P's. Stings her at the bowser using 98 which was good incentive to get a job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We came down to the Jazz vs the Hyundai i30. I wanted the Honda and she wanted the Hyundai so we ended up with the i30. It's a decent car, goes well, cheap to run, 5 star safety and cheap to insure etc. Has most of the mod-cons like Apple Car Play etc. She loves it and my wife quite likes it too - to the extent she's happy to look at a Hyundai when the time comes for a new car for her.

Could be the only time I get to Kona :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife has a 2007 Honda Jazz VTI-S 1.5 Manual, Good little car.  Done just over 100k, only problem has been the coil packs needed to be replaced. Keep them serviced & they seem to go for ever.

We are going to sell it in the next few weeks. She wants a CX-5, she's a bit bored with the Jazz. 

We did think about selling my Subaru Forester to get the CX-5 & I would drive the Jazz, but I'm waiting for the trinube trade up deal to kick in,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, goughy said:

Obviously has to be manual since she doesn't want to learn to drive in my HiAce Commuter, even though I told her if she can drive that she can drive anything!

Go for a 3 on the tree WB ute, then she'll be ready for the B&S balls as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a big van, like a 15 seater bus! Actually had to be limited to 12 seats to drive it on a standard licence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is learning to drive in my Narvara. Has cred in a bogan way.

If she can drive that she will be fine in anything smaller or smoother.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

My daughter is learning to drive in my Narvara. Has cred in a bogan way.

If she can drive that she will be fine in anything smaller or smoother.

I'm probably the last person to ask about first cars .... I learned to drive on the farm in a Bedford 12T truck and then on the road in Dad's F350 double-cab (5.8L V8, 4 speed top loader, no power steering or brakes and the thing weighed 3T). 

But, Dad's quite coherent rationale was that "Son, if you can drive that well, you can drive anything!" .... and he was right. Those lessons and that practical experience taught me about acceleration, speed, deceleration, braking, handling, spatial awareness, positioning, predictability, car control, mechanical sympathy etc etc. 

And, for my thinking, that is the most important thing. It shouldn't be about the vehicle, but the learning.

After that, my first car was a 1967 BRG Mini Panel-van (1310cc race motor, cross-flow polished head, close ratio gearbox, long final drive, disc brake front end, roll cage to stiffen the whole thing up....) that I rebuilt on weekends and at nights. Thing was an absolute rocketship and handled like a go kart!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

My daughter is learning to drive in my Narvara. Has cred in a bogan way.

If she can drive that she will be fine in anything smaller or smoother.

Our youngest learned and did her test in my 93 Hilux. I reckon the RMS tester gave her her P's out of sympathy for having to go for her licence in that rough old rig.

8 hours ago, Tryline said:

A Diesel Holden Cruze would be good to.

Wouldn't touch one with a barge pole.  Worked with a woman who bought a new one and it was a complete POS.  Kept going into limp mode, Holden would not help her out at all.

5 hours ago, Rimmer said:

And, for my thinking, that is the most important thing. It shouldn't be about the vehicle, but the learning.

No, I'm with Parky on this one.  Get something safe.  Our daughter wrote off her first car and used up her get out of jail free card because the driving learning/test teaches you nothing about car handling and how to react in a panic situation.  Hence she jammed her foot hard on the brake and held it there coming into a wet LH corner and sent the car spinning across the oncoming lane (even though it had ABS).  Only be sheer luck there was nothing coming the other way and she hit the crash barriers and walked away without a scratch.  There is a very high chance they will prang their first car so get one with at least ABS & front airbags.  Her Yaris has everything - 7 airbags, ABS, traction control, braking smarts......  This has already saved her from a collision when another car failed to give way at a Sydney roundabout.  And maybe get her an advanced driving lesson on the skidpan - though I suspect for their first few emergencies they will still get it wrong.  Only time in the driver seat makes you better at reacting in a more sensible way when things go wrong.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Rimmer said:

 

But, Dad's quite coherent rationale was that "Son, if you can drive that well, you can drive anything!" .... and he was right. Those lessons and that practical experience taught me about acceleration, speed, deceleration, braking, handling, spatial awareness, positioning, predictability, car control, mechanical sympathy etc etc. 

 

I was similar, had a family friend with access to Semis and Buses.  I had to spend time behind the wheel of both on private land just to appreciate the stopping distance and turning circle required.  Big part of the education was learning to respect other road users, really wish this was taught to all road users.  For control in the manual I had to practice my hill starts on a steep hill with loose gravel, when I could do that without any wheel spin I was deemed ready for the test.  Will be doing as much as possible for my kids when they are ready

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lesson 2 for my daughter was on gravel, planting foot, slamming on brakes etc. Decided that handbrake may be bit much.

She was a bit disconcerted when the Narvara flicked on planting foot. This is a kid who is growing up in Sydney suburbia, not the country as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/11/2017 at 5:56 AM, goughy said:

So, I know pretty much nothing about cars. But we're starting to browse around for our daughters first car. She's been saving, plus grandparents and us, I reckon there'll be around 7k to spend. Now, she really only wants a Honda Jazz (Jas in a Jazz), which I don't really have an issue with, but what else is really worth a gander at?  My main consideration with the Jazz is that to get something not too old we are looking at the 1.3ltr models. Is that really a problem, that small an engine, or should we go older to get a 1.5ltr?  Obviously has to be manual since she doesn't want to learn to drive in my HiAce Commuter, even though I told her if she can drive that she can drive anything!

Hyundai is a good option, cheap servicing. Just pull out the back seat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

No, I'm with Parky on this one.  Get something safe.  Our daughter wrote off her first car and used up her get out of jail free card because the driving learning/test teaches you nothing about car handling and how to react in a panic situation.  Hence she jammed her foot hard on the brake and held it there coming into a wet LH corner and sent the car spinning across the oncoming lane (even though it had ABS).  Only be sheer luck there was nothing coming the other way and she hit the crash barriers and walked away without a scratch.  There is a very high chance they will prang their first car so get one with at least ABS & front airbags.  Her Yaris has everything - 7 airbags, ABS, traction control, braking smarts......  This has already saved her from a collision when another car failed to give way at a Sydney roundabout.  And maybe get her an advanced driving lesson on the skidpan - though I suspect for their first few emergencies they will still get it wrong.  Only time in the driver seat makes you better at reacting in a more sensible way when things go wrong.

Completely accept what you say on this, and wasn't suggesting that you not get her the safest car available.

The point I was trying to make is that by simplifying everything away from the technological aids, you get a much better appreciation of the physics of driving, what happens and how the car reacts and what to do when it does react. I remember doing a Jim Murcott driver training course at Sandown in 1995 when ABS was just starting to become a standard on cars. One of the instructors removed the fuse which activated the ABS and the driver had absolutely no control in braking or steering under braking she was so dependent on the ABS. 

Driver training and being - in a controlled way - challenged on driving is the key. All conditions, all weathers, day, night, dusk, with proper attention and supervision.

Would also highly recommend Advanced Driver Training and rate it the same way I rate bike racing as a great learning curve to triathlon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Cottoneyes said:

I was similar, had a family friend with access to Semis and Buses.  I had to spend time behind the wheel of both on private land just to appreciate the stopping distance and turning circle required.  Big part of the education was learning to respect other road users, really wish this was taught to all road users.  For control in the manual I had to practice my hill starts on a steep hill with loose gravel, when I could do that without any wheel spin I was deemed ready for the test.  Will be doing as much as possible for my kids when they are ready

Respect is the key in driving as much as it is in riding bikes - and not acting like a tool in both. If there was a lot more understanding and respect (and education, attention, care, skill etc), theoretically, we would have zero road accidents.

When I eventually did my test in Ballarat, I did it in the F350, with my Dad in the middle of the bench seat (as supervisor) and the tester in the passengers seat. I lost 10 points for turning the radio back on when the tester turned it off, another 10 points for having the arm resting on the window sill and 10 points for performing a hill start without using the handbrake. Pass was 70 points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wifey has found this one, that seems a bit cheaper than other comparable or older ones, or smaller engined ones.  Buying cars is not something I do much so anyone got any ideas what I should be looking out for?  Don't wanna bother them through carsales till I'm serious as I know they get charged for enquiries.

https://www.carsales.com.au/dealer/details/Honda-Jazz-2009/OAG-AD-15337237 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a read of this: https://www.carsguide.com.au/car-reviews/honda-jazz-used-review-2002-2014-31146 and do alot of other reviews online, forums are a good spot for finding good and bad things about models.  You'll get common things to be looking for on the test drive from these.

Take a magnet with you, check it sticks along the bottom edges - if it don't stick good chance it's been bogged due to accident or rust (I always use this when looking at 4wds more, but a simple check that still works on all cars)

Start the engine and have someone stand behind the exhaust with white piece of paper, the whiter it is after the better.  Lift boot lining and check that all bolts are same colour as the internal panels, same in the engine bonnet.  If you see the bolts have been turned or removed at all, good chance that it's been repaired following an accident.  Similarly look down the side panels checking they all match, check the doors and boot close properly.  Test everything - horn, radio (cd player as well), parking brake, internal lights, blinkers, wipers, wiper sprayers - make a list before you go and check it off, you'll get caught up otherwise and forget something.  Sit in your own car and go over everything to go on the list, go through your manual index for other ideas.  Road worthies don't mean things are correct - I've seen a car sold with a road worthy missing 3 out of 5 wheel nuts on one wheel.  Check all engines and fluids in the engine bay, check for colour, consistency and levels

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taught my daughter in a manual Mazda 2, in inner city Sydney this year.  I was surprised  when the examiner said to me after she got  her licence that only about 1 in 30 kids does there test in a manual.   Even allowing for a bit of exaggeration that seems to me an amazing number.

Before her test she did a couple of lessons with a driving school to make sure she didn't pick up any of my bad habits,  she found it tough to get an instructor in a manual.

Edited by lawman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, lawman said:

Taught my daughter in a manual Mazda 2, in inner city Sydney.  I was surprised  when the examiner said to me after she got  her licence that only about 1 in 30 kids does there test in a manual.   Even allowing for a bit of exaggeration that seems to me an amazing number.

Unlike some other states, NSW allows you to drive a manual after you've had your P's for a year. Why would they bother with the effort of sitting the test in a manual?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

Unlike some other states, NSW allows you to drive a manual after you've had your P's for a year. Why would they bother with the effort of sitting the test in a manual?

If they are going to sit their test in manual, I would think that they are more likely to spend more time learning in one.  As a parent, I'm hoping it makes them a better driver, that was certainly the feedback from the examiner.

She's now at school in Europe for 12 months, but for what its worth she much preferred driving (or to be seen by her friends) in our auto BT50.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's just it. You don't have to sit the test in a manual down there. In Qld, if you want to drive a manual you have to sit a test in a manual. In NSW, you can do all your learning in an auto, sit the test in an auto (which is heaps easier), and then a year later, drive a manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

That's just it. You don't have to sit the test in a manual down there. In Qld, if you want to drive a manual you have to sit a test in a manual. In NSW, you can do all your learning in an auto, sit the test in an auto (which is heaps easier), and then a year later, drive a manual.

yes but why would you ever want to drive a manual.

The reason my daughter wont learn in a manual is I'm not driving one daily in traffic, also not buying another car just for her to learn in, there is no guarantee of a car when she gets her P plates unless she saves for one (that ain't happening).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jas is getting a car regardless - she's paying for half of it, hence why she has two jobs atm.  Can't wait till she's working 7 days a week during the school holidays.  She'll be begging for school to start.  While I like auto's, I don't mind having a manual in a car that doesn't have a lot of oomph, which are in things like my work van and a small car with a small engine.  Just feel they drive better as a manual.  Bigger cars, who cares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, lawman said:

If they are going to sit their test in manual, I would think that they are more likely to spend more time learning in one.  As a parent, I'm hoping it makes them a better driver, that was certainly the feedback from the examiner.

She's now at school in Europe for 12 months, but for what its worth she much preferred driving (or to be seen by her friends) in our auto BT50.

I learned in and have always driven a manual. (I admit I wouldn't if stuck in Sydney traffic for 2 hours a day) I too think they teach better control and make her a better driver. And the car she was going to be driving after getting her p's was a manual so she had no choice in my decision!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

That's just it. You don't have to sit the test in a manual down there. In Qld, if you want to drive a manual you have to sit a test in a manual. In NSW, you can do all your learning in an auto, sit the test in an auto (which is heaps easier), and then a year later, drive a manual.

So how long do you have to wait to drive a manual (40km below the speed limit in the right lane of a 4 lane motorway) in Qld?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Parkside said:

...... 40km below the speed limit in the right lane of a 4 lane motorway in Qld....and in NSW and everywhere else.

And how Qld plates disable the indicators, and turn you into a complete random driver.

Our youngest got her Ps in a manual, but drives an auto (much more relaxing in ridiculous Sydney traffic).  Our eldest got her Ps in an auto and basically has not driven since (does not like driving - probably a good thing for other road users :wink1:).  Both have full licences now, which in the case of our eldest shows what a joke the testing system is.

Edited by ComfortablyNumb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Parkside said:

I learned in and have always driven a manual.

I learned to drive with a manual, but passed my test in one of these. Walking from start to end requires a cut lunch.  What a hoot, I think the tester just gave it to me when I nailed the 3-point turn.

1200px-1968_Pontiac_Parisienne_(16322836

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, XCOM! said:

I learned to drive with a manual, but passed my test in one of these. Walking from start to end requires a cut lunch.  What a hoot, I think the tester just gave it to me when I nailed the 3-point turn.

1200px-1968_Pontiac_Parisienne_(16322836

A Greek guy I went to school with in the late 1980s inherited his dad's bright yellow 1973 Rambler Matador, with a 6.6L V8 in it, which he subsequently nitroed! This was just before the power : weight restrictions came in in Victoria. He used to do a regular burnout out the front of the school gates every night and it must have cost him a bomb in fuel, nitro and tyres. 

Would definitely NOT recommend the Matador as a first car! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My eldest got a manual 2004 Suzuki Grand Vitara as a first car.  The sticker he put on the back sums ups its performance "0-60...eventually".   Top speed is about 110km/h (downhill with a tail wind). No electronic driving aids but considering that some of his learner driver time was spent on muddy and Sandy tracks he learnt how to drive in conditions that he's not going to get on the blacktop too often.  

He's upgraded now so we bought the Vitara back and now my youngest will learn to drive in it.  But in the meantime I'm using it as my daily commuter and having a lot of fun in it.

 

TwoCars.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

I learned to drive with a manual, but passed my test in one of these. Walking from start to end requires a cut lunch.  What a hoot, I think the tester just gave it to me when I nailed the 3-point turn.

When I moved to Oz, the option of 'swapping' my UK licence for an Oz wasn't there like it is now. I had to take a test for car and moto.  Took my test in my FIL's massive old Charger, this thing was longer than 3 postcodes and turned slower than the Nimitz.

Took my test in the country town where FIL and family lived. The streets were all very wide, except for the street he picked to get me to turn the car around. I'd never seen that street before and bugger me it was narrow.  No way a 3 point turn is happening without touching the curb but I didn't panic. 

I completed the turn in 5 points and he said 'nice to see someone that actually reads the rules'. He went on to say he picks that street for folks in big cars to see if they attempt a 3 pt turn, then promptly fails them when they touch the curb.

What a bastard :lol:

Edited by FatPom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×