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podster1

Going back to a Road Bike for long course.

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After getting back on my TriBike after a 6 month break. Last race being Husky long course. I dont think after a number of fits, saddles etc, i have ever been really comfortable on it. More put up with it.  After doing a trainer set last night. Where i was more worried about being in the aero poistion than actually the hard set, i thought maybe i should sell. Its a Shiv 2015 with stock wheels.
Whats people thoughts on selling this and just going Aero bike route.
What would be the difference really between a Shiv with stock wheels, vs say a Venge/S3 with carbon wheels over a 70.3 or even an Ironman. Am i really going to be that much fresher off the bike.? At husky it was pretty much 5 mins in aero, 2 x mins recover and attempt again. I'm not a gun on a bike. I do long course mainly to give me a goal so that i actually get off my arse during the year and train.

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I've done my last two long course races on an aero road bike with clip ons having previously raced on a TT bike.  Looking at my power I probably gave up 10-15 mins by using the road bike but it didn't really matter for what I was targeting.  Achieving a decent TT position on a road bike is very difficult though and it's full of compromises - my P5 was a great fit and I could have stayed in the TT position all day but I then went and sold it for some reason....

You could get an independent bike fit done which would then spit out recommended frames (and ones to avoid for your body shape/flexibility) - may find the Shiv just is a bad fit.

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I did this several years ago, went to a Felt AR

I don't know anything quantifiable but enjoy riding the Felt

Just watch the ride comfort on some of the aero rd bikes as they are rumoured to be quite harsh, 

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2 hours ago, podster1 said:
After getting back on my TriBike after a 6 month break. Last race being Husky long course. I dont think after a number of fits, saddles etc, i have ever been really comfortable on it. More put up with it.  After doing a trainer set last night. Where i was more worried about being in the aero poistion than actually the hard set, i thought maybe i should sell. Its a Shiv 2015 with stock wheels.
Whats people thoughts on selling this and just going Aero bike route.
What would be the difference really between a Shiv with stock wheels, vs say a Venge/S3 with carbon wheels over a 70.3 or even an Ironman. Am i really going to be that much fresher off the bike.? At husky it was pretty much 5 mins in aero, 2 x mins recover and attempt again. I'm not a gun on a bike. I do long course mainly to give me a goal so that i actually get off my arse during the year and train.

I couldn't ever imagine doing 180kms down on the drops...

 

Why were you worried about being in the aero position when on the trainer? What saddle are you using and what have you used? I had problems with a number of saddles, ISM Adamo and Fizik saddles, jumped on a Sitero and it was a revelation. Saddles are a very individual thing, so you may need to play around with different models. Bike shops often let you try them out. And what are the main issues with being aero? TT bikes are so adjustable, if you don't have any injuries or disabilities I can't see why you can't get comfortable.

Edited by zed

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55 minutes ago, zed said:

I couldn't ever imagine doing 180kms down on the drops...

 

Why were you worried about being in the aero position when on the trainer? What saddle are you using and what have you used? I had problems with a number of saddles, ISM Adamo and Fizik saddles, jumped on a Sitero and it was a revelation. Saddles are a very individual thing, so you may need to play around with different models. Bike shops often let you try them out. And what are the main issues with being aero? TT bikes are so adjustable, if you don't have any injuries or disabilities I can't see why you can't get comfortable.

Thanks for the reply. Worried about being in the aero position as it was just not fun. Saddles - Started with the Sitero, felt like being on a plank of wood, tried the ISM Adamo/PN1.1, Cobb Saddles, just didnt work. Im now on a Specilized Power saddle, which is great on my road bike and so far is the only saddle not to give me numbness. Had many fits, from the Specilized apprroved one, retul, and finally with someone that was old skool and could tell as soon as i got on it wasnt right. I think i will just keep it going and see if its just from not being in the positon and not riding for so long. Its just frustrating hearing about people who say they can stay aero all day long. I'm not sure what i would pay to get a perfect bike / fit and just worry about hitting the power. Could be the bike is just not right i guess.

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So even on your windtrainer you feel uncomfortable? Maybe it's the bike? What do you mean not fun in the aero position? Sore/stiff?

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4 minutes ago, zed said:

So even on your windtrainer you feel uncomfortable? Maybe it's the bike? What do you mean not fun in the aero position? Sore/stiff?

 
Just feels ackward, not natural, like my body is struggling to hold it. Like if i was holding a stretch. So i guess stiff. Pedalling doesnt feel like a natural movement. I can still do it, but its just not fun. it feels false. Im going to be on again tomorrow and another one at the weekend. Will follow a programme for 6 weeks so 18 sessions. By then i think i will know where i am at. Hopefully, Thanks for your reply.

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Not everyone fits/ likes/ is comfortable in the aero position on a TT rig

In the end the best aero position is the one you can hold the longest.  Some people just dont relax on a TT bike either, this makes them ride very gingerly and therefore slower. 

If you feel more comfortable on a roadie and most importantly if you enjoy it more, then go for it and try and get the best you can out of it.

After all, there was a time when all of us were racing tri's on bastardised road bikes. (Even Macca on his Kestrels) 

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I've been slowly in comeback past two months. All on road bike. 

Put the tri bike on trainer last weekend. Comfy as hell an hour straight up. 

Ryan @ 3D bike fit and the right saddle. Never been more comfy. Nor more aero. 

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Plenty of people in the U.K.  do LD tri on road bikes, quite a few of them sans clip ons. I've done quite a few TTs on road bikes. If I were looking at a road bike set up for tri ( assuming no clip ons) I would set my bars either lower, so I could maintain a flat forearm coming the the hoods, or set them slightly higher maintain a flat forearm from the hooks.

i see a lot of folks at races with roadies that have their bars very low but when they grab the hooks, their arms are dead straight and catching a lot of air.

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8 hours ago, podster1 said:

At husky it was pretty much 5 mins in aero, 2 x mins recover and attempt again.

I think this is the key.

If you can't sit aero for 30+ minutes, I doubt you're going to lose much going to a roadie.

Especially if your 5 & 2 becomes more like 2 & 5 towards the end.

If I start, I'll be on my propel at Sunny Coast.

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I have been racing for 15 years on a Road Bike, with Tri bike set-up. Works fine for me as I didn't have the flexibility for the TT bike until now.

We'll see how next weekend goes on the Blade, though.

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I've been off my TT for 12 months - it's been road or MTB. Then on Sunday I got back on it, rode 150km hard and then climbed 1000m over 20km. 

The first few hours were ok, and I stayed mostly on the bars, but after that I was up and stretching often. Power was good, I think I just wasn't used to the position after so long off it. Added to that, I'm not one to praise the aero position, have always endured rather than enjoyed, and haven't had a proper bike fit.  

By the end of the day I was badly chafed on my inner groin and taint. really bad. I remebered that the fizik saddle never really felt good, and if I wasn't in tri shorts with a thin pad I always got sore before. 

Still love the bike, but without a proper bike fit and buckets of cash to get fitted and fixed immediately, I see it as a journey of trial and error until I can say I've got that all day comfort. 

I'm going to raise the height of the pads and try a Cobb saddle next. 

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I've just given up the full TT bike after last season. Age and old injuries from my military career have finally caught up with me. I just can't maintain a decent comfortable position on the TT. So time to move on. I've got a nice aero roadie with clip on bars and a setup that works for me on my other bikes. 

Happy as with the result and actually look forward to riding the new bike. I guess this coming summers races will confirm whether I've done the right thing. 

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Thanks for the replies. Will have a think about this. My friend is doing Ironman Wales this weekend on a Roadie, a Tarmac Its his second Ironman.. Lets see how he goes. He doesnt have a TT bike so i guess the decision was easier for him. Its a Hilly Course, so i think the decision for this one is alot easier.

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Always wondered how much difference there is between the new aero road bikes like say between Cervelo's S5 and P5 and Specialized's Venge and Shiv.

I had a Venge for a while and it was fast (with 38mm carbon clinchers), so fast I didn't have to train :lol::lol: in fact, I just wasn't riding on the road often enough to justify keeping it, though I still have a tri/TT bike which I transferred over the DA9000 11spd kit and still haven't ridden it :huh: I have my excuses but economically I need to make a decision to sell it now before the grouppo passes into vintage status. I have a Malvern Star Oppy C7 which is also pretty aero but allows me to use my Specialized Pave seat post to add some comfort (and hang a decent tail light off it too!). I think the C7 feels nearly as fast as the Venge, they were both faster than my old Tarmac.

So I think it is possible with an aero road bike to get pretty close to the aero advantage of a run of the mill tri/TT bike and maybe add some clip-on aero bars like the Deda Blast. I think shorter bars are better on a road bike otherwise you get too stretched over the front and close the hip angle too much. Are there any studies showing comparisons between aero road bikes and TT bikes?

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3 hours ago, podster1 said:

Thanks for the replies. Will have a think about this. My friend is doing Ironman Wales this weekend on a Roadie, a Tarmac Its his second Ironman.. Lets see how he goes. He doesnt have a TT bike so i guess the decision was easier for him. Its a Hilly Course, so i think the decision for this one is alot easier.

When I'm on a hilly training ride, I'd always opt for my roadie and am generally quicker than peeps who are on TTs. 

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I'm doing Busso on my Canyon Aeroad, no clipons. couldn't find any to fit the flat bars.

Decided on the roadie instead of the tt as I thought I would get more enjoyment overall out of it. ie. group rides and hills.

I feel safer on the roadie when out on the open roads. I also find it easier to get the training in the position done, so hopefully the body holds up.(also just out there to complete)

So far i'm happy with my decision but maybe ask me again after Busso.

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My fastest bike times in Ironman races were set on a road bike with clip ons - comfort is the main thing - I have a TT bike now but do wonder if my times would be the same on the road bike  ?

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42 minutes ago, AP said:

My fastest bike times in Ironman races were set on a road bike with clip ons - comfort is the main thing - I have a TT bike now but do wonder if my times would be the same on the road bike  ?

How much younger were you then? 

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8 hours ago, podster1 said:

Thanks for the replies. Will have a think about this. My friend is doing Ironman Wales this weekend on a Roadie, a Tarmac Its his second Ironman.. Lets see how he goes. He doesnt have a TT bike so i guess the decision was easier for him. Its a Hilly Course, so i think the decision for this one is alot easier.

What's his bib number mate? I will look out for him.  Roadies are a good call for this weekend, it's bloody nasty out there and the handling and braking advantage on a roadie will good for those not familiar with the course.

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21 minutes ago, FatPom said:

What's his bib number mate? I will look out for him.  Roadies are a good call for this weekend, it's bloody nasty out there and the handling and braking advantage on a roadie will good for those not familiar with the course.

1716 - Russell - 45+ . You will likely lap him. He will likely be walking the Marathon.

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2 hours ago, podster1 said:

1716 - Russell - 45+ . You will likely lap him. He will likely be walking the Marathon.

Don't know about the lapping bit but I will look for him. :)

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