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ComfortablyNumb

Double Crash Day

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A few weeks ago I misjudged a bunnyhop over a log and copped the dmr vault claws of death in my shin! On Saturday my bars clipped a tree (not going very quick) and off I came. I banged the exact same spot on a rock or log or something and fark me it hurt like a bastard! Took half an hour to stop hurting every time I hit a bump!

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27 minutes ago, Chookman said:

A few weeks ago I misjudged a bunnyhop over a log and copped the dmr vault claws of death in my shin! On Saturday my bars clipped a tree (not going very quick) and off I came. I banged the exact same spot on a rock or log or something and fark me it hurt like a bastard! Took half an hour to stop hurting every time I hit a bump!

Yeah, I landed on exactly the same spot on my left forearm both times. It kept waking me up that night.  But shins are far worse!

When I was a kid, I'd have jumped straight up without any pain.  Now I have to lie there for a bit to get my bearings back, before I can stand.

Will go back to putting the GoPro on my helmet - too much shake on the bars = get motion sick watching the vid.  I also need to find a better way to stabilise shaky footage.  The Youtube stabilisation seems to reduce the quality a fair bit, and the GoPro Studio editing software has no stabilising facility as far as I can tell?

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51 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

 

Will go back to putting the GoPro on my helmet - too much shake on the bars = get motion sick watching the vid.  I also need to find a better way to stabilise shaky footage.  The Youtube stabilisation seems to reduce the quality a fair bit, and the GoPro Studio editing software has no stabilising facility as far as I can tell?

go pro on a chest harness seams the best, that is what my son has found.

on Helmet made helmet unsteady on head, on bars to much vibration

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1 hour ago, rory-dognz said:

go pro on a chest harness seams the best, that is what my son has found.

on Helmet made helmet unsteady on head, on bars to much vibration

OK, I've got one of those so will use that.

For fly-fishing I have a head strap, but I must try the chest strap again there too.

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2 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

My wife noticed this today. Quite artistic use of colour I thought.

MTB_Bruise.JPG

I'm guessing you don't wear elbow guards? After having broken both elbows (15 years apart) and having them wired back together I always wear them.

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28 minutes ago, Chookman said:

I'm guessing you don't wear elbow guards? After having broken both elbows (15 years apart) and having them wired back together I always wear them.

No, but I had been looking into them, and knee guards also.  You are right, I need to invest ASAP!

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I came off twice in 25 minutes today. Over the bars both times. First one took an A line and stalled, laughed it off.

Second one mis judged a fairly small rock drop and planted the front. Broke my fall with my chest and hands. 

How the dirt went through my shirt, I will never figure out. Currently trying to find a comfortable lying down position. 

09DEB4AE-900A-4097-A8FD-89FDB26FB620.jpeg

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Tyno, are you running a dropper post, best invention for mtbing since front suspension in my view.

If not drop your seat min of 10% of that you would normally ride, going over the bars generally means you are not going back far/fast enough and weight is to far forward.

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No dropper post.

I went over the stack in my mind afterwards.

I don't think I shifted position at all.

Just wasn't paying proper attention to what I was doing and paid the price.

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On ‎11‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 12:04 PM, Tyno said:

No dropper post.

I went over the stack in my mind afterwards.

I don't think I shifted position at all.

Just wasn't paying proper attention to what I was doing and paid the price.

Until you get  dropper (if you go that way) drop your seat as far down as it will go and session some roll downs. moving back is only part of it... a dropped post will let you get lower and not have to adopt such and extreme backwards position. So basically. approach the rolldown; look at where you want to go; avoid any sudden braking; drop your heels and arse down and straighten your arms. With a bit of time and practice using this technique you'll be able to roll just about anything that is actually rollable (some simply aren't and you need to drop off them).

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My road-bike riding fly-fishing mate said to me y'day (after I was complaining about my seriously stuffed wrist from nearly going over the bars), "MTB is a young man's sport".  I hope he's wrong, given I just invested in a new bike :o

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23 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

My road-bike riding fly-fishing mate said to me y'day (after I was complaining about my seriously stuffed wrist from nearly going over the bars), "MTB is a young man's sport".  I hope he's wrong, given I just invested in a new bike :o

I see lots of 60+ Men and women out on the trails doing all the same lines as the younger ones. Any exercise is great as we age but I believe MTB keeps you younger. Road riding does virtually nothing for your bone health, balance or reflex's. Think of how much your mind has to process riding the average technical trail! There is always something to work on and improve and that's what keeps it interesting!

Edited by Chookman

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15 hours ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

My road-bike riding fly-fishing mate said to me y'day (after I was complaining about my seriously stuffed wrist from nearly going over the bars), "MTB is a young man's sport".  I hope he's wrong, given I just invested in a new bike :o

It's funny this perception that it is a young persons sport. It is probably the one form of cycling that you will see all ages from about 8 years up doing the same trails.

Go to Thredbo and be surprised when the downhill guys take of there full face helmets, alot of middle aged / older men and women enjoying themselves. I road on Sunday on easy fireroads and would have seen a even split over the ages. Certainly allot more even than road cycling or Tri's.

It is the one sport that i do with my kids (16 and 18 years old), yes they are faster but we ride the same trails, and i have the endurance to out last them. I don't ride as aggressively as them, but never have.

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Second local MTB 'race' y'day on the new Norco Fluid 3 as part of their winter series.  Had a cold the last few days so feeling pretty doughy but still 2.5mins faster than the first race on my wife's Giant Talon over 15kms.  The rear suspension saves your arse.  I think it will be great training for local sprint tris if I can ever work out a regime that allows me to run a bit again. In the red zone a lot, but because you are so busy concentrating on staying upright and figuring out how to get through the next obstacle, you don't notice the aerobic hurt so much.

One tricky thing is the alternate light & shade in the forest sections. On the last lap (knackered) I completely lost sight of the track, missed a 90 deg right hander & corner and speared off into the pine trees.

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