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Mike Honcho

Cx opinions sought.

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Greetings

 

I'm looking at a cheap bike for some gravel trail riding. Ive got a holiday home in the states which I currently have a super cheap Wal-Mart 29er at and spend 6-8 weeks a year there over summer so am not interested in dropping coin for a full time bike. Excess baggage fees for a bike will add up pretty quick. While the Wal-Mart thing is fine, I'm not overly confident with the braking performance. The trails I ride on are about 5km from my joint and I thought that cx bike would be the go as i could also do a little road riding to get there as well instead of putting it in the car. 

 

This is what I'm thinking. 

 

https://www.diamondback.com/road-bikes/haanjo-tero

 

Anything for that kind of price is going to be low spec of course but are there any glaring 'dont buy' things that stand out to the educated? 40mm tyres and disc brakes sound pretty perfect for what I will use it for. 

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They are good fun.  I built a Planet X cx bike about 5 yrs ago and it is all I ride these days on the road, which isnt often.   Mine has cantilever brakes so is a bit sketchy in terms of stopping power.  They are the worlds best commuter bikes.   My roadie has been on the trainer for about 3yrs.

If there is a even a hint of single track "fun" use though, I personally would get a hardtail 29er.  They still fly on the road if you have plenty of pressure in the tyres (which you can drop psi at trailhead).  1k in the 2nd hand market can get you some decent bike (forks being king).  

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What Diamonds said...  5km on the road is nothing on a hardtail 29er and will be a nice little warmup before you hit the trails.

You'll save a few dollars on fuel and will probably tend to ride more on a half decent bike because it's more enjoyable.

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What both diamonds and go easy said although I've got a dualie but lock out the front and rear suspension while riding on the road before hitting the trail. 

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On 30/04/2017 at 1:10 AM, Mike Honcho said:

Ive got a holiday home in the states which I currently have a super chea

No input re the CX bike. 

The fact you have a holiday home in the States is AWESOME.  Very Jealous. 

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15 hours ago, Mike Honcho said:

Thanks guys. Not quite the question I was asking though. Looking more at the specifics of that bike for any glaring dodgy bits. 

I had a Boardman CX which was "similar". I replaced the SRAM with ultegra just because I preferred it and had plenty of pares on hand. Was a great fun bike and got plenty of use. In winter if I had time for a quick arvo ride Id put some lights on and hit the fire trails in Kurnell park for half an hour rather than get on the trainer or road. 

The only thing that is a bit "meh" on them is the cable discs. They work "well enough" mine had Avid Juicy's I think, but they dont tend to self centre like hydro. and take a bit of fenagling to get them spot on, but once they are set and rolling they are still better than a rim brake option if you are going off road or in mud/ wet etc. and they are easy enough to tinker with without getting all caught up in bleeding hydros etc. 

They are great fun, I used mine to commute to work a few times as they can be almost as fast as a roadie but you arent confined to roads, dirt, gravel, gutters, even a bit of sand, mud rocky stuff etc. 

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I use the tried and tested cable actuated Avid/SRAM BB7s - bloody good stopping power. Used them on my XC bike which I would take to the US just to save on the hassle of hydro air in the lines, maintenance and the like.

While they don't self centre and the spacing as per the SRAM instructions is meant to be 2/3 actuator side and 1/3 non-actuator side I found 50/50 (that is centred) worked just as well and was easy to set up - just do the old trick, loosen the bolts for the caliper and tighten the hand lever and hold, now re-tighten the caliper bolts. Now you have the non-actuator side brake pas rubbing on the rotor, just use the adjustment dial to back it off a bit until you hear no rotor rubbing when the wheel spins.You can also use the actuator side dial to bring the pad closer to the rotor until you are happy with the "feel" at the lever, use the same spin test to make sure the pad isn't rubbing.

As the pads wear you can adjust the pads inwards a bit until you get it feeling the same as before.

I hope I made that sound simple :D:D 

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