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willie

Why do you/don't you wear Hoka's?

  

62 members have voted

  1. 1. The models of Hoka I wear are

    • Stinson
      6
    • Arahi
      4
    • Clayton
      3
    • Speed Instict
      1
    • Bondi
      9
    • Tracer
      3
    • Clifton
      9
    • Vanquish
      0
    • Speedgoat
      2
    • Challenger
      3
    • Other
      11
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      26
  2. 2. I buy my Hokas......

    • Online - Overseas
      4
    • Online - Australian Stores
      18
    • Bricks and Mortar Store
      15
    • Other
      3
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      26
  3. 3. When I need to replace my Hokas I will replace them wiith...

    • The Same Model Hoka (i.e Clifton 3 with Clifton 3)
      10
    • Newer version of same model Hoka (I.e Clifton replaced with Clifton 4)
      21
    • Similar style shoe (Altra, Vasque, Brooks Transcend)
      2
    • A more "mainstream" shoe
      3
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      26


Recommended Posts

Kiwinoz    60

I have a pair of Hoka Infinite (9.7oz) in my line-up. My primary and still preferred shoe for the past 18 months has been the Saucony Fastwitch (5.9oz). When I tested the Hoka in June 2016 I found the transition from a shoe with lots of ground feel to one so built up very unnatural. I wanted to test a shoe with more cushioning for when the legs are tired and as EVA weighs a lot less now than 10 years ago I was attracted to the Hoka. I chose the infinite as it was a tempo shoe with a similar heel-top drop and it provided some stability for late stage over pronation, something I experience as my leg swings laterally due to various bio-mechanical issues. I recently began testing other shoes (Newton Motion, Asic DS Racer, Saucony Guide) along with the Hoka. I doubt I would race in the Inifinte due to the weight penalty, at this stage it is a toss up between the Infinite and the Guide as to my preferred choice of heavy duty trainer for tired legs.

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fitfastfat977    768

I have Stinson 3

Originally bought to try them out....felt like a dick wearing them after 8 years of Kayano wear. Went back to the kayanos until they were trashed, got the Hokas out from under the bed.

 

And the same results....meaning my troublesome right hip and left knee were happy doing double the volume of running I had been doing.

Yeah they may look funny to some but if I can run 30km split into a double run day, and pull up with no leg soreness at all the next day just general fatigue....well I am sold.

 

Great shoes because they keep you running longer with less injuries in my experience.

 

Edit to add: Best of luck with the shop mate [emoji106][emoji106]

Edited by fitfastfat977

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SMB    1

Also use the Fasttwitch, and have done for many iterations. Guide is my daily trainer. Would like to try the Tracer as potentially a marathon/IM shoe instead of Fastwitch in the hope of providing slightly more relief towards the end of the run. Might need to check out the Infinite too as an option for daily miles.

 

I have a pair of Hoka Infinite (9.7oz) in my line-up. My primary and still preferred shoe for the past 18 months has been the Saucony Fastwitch (5.9oz). When I tested the Hoka in June 2016 I found the transition from a shoe with lots of ground feel to one so built up very unnatural. I wanted to test a shoe with more cushioning for when the legs are tired and as EVA weighs a lot less now than 10 years ago I was attracted to the Hoka. I chose the infinite as it was a tempo shoe with a similar heel-top drop and it provided some stability for late stage over pronation, something I experience as my leg swings laterally due to various bio-mechanical issues. I recently began testing other shoes (Newton Motion, Asic DS Racer, Saucony Guide) along with the Hoka. I doubt I would race in the Inifinte due to the weight penalty, at this stage it is a toss up between the Infinite and the Guide as to my preferred choice of heavy duty trainer for tired legs.

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Lostkiwi    151

I'm too tight to spend $250 to experiment on something I might hate. If you ever have a demo day Willie I'd be happy to have a trot around in them.

What size are you? I've got some 9k old Claytons I'd sell pretty cheap. 10.5 US. I've had about twenty pairs of hokas. The Claytons are the only ones ever to give me blisters.

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Ironnerd    330

I have issues with my left foot going numb when running no matter what shoe I wear so hoping the extra cushioning may help that.

If you are having numbness in the foot Google "Morton's Neuroma". If your symptoms match this go to your GP ASAP before you make it any worse.

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Ironnerd    330

If the PF came back you never addressed the issue. My thoughts would be Rehab while you are running in the Hokas.

Isotonic single calf raises on edge off step weighted 3 secs up 3 secs down with your feet on towel trying to grab towel. 3 sets of 8 each daily for a few weeks would help greatly

I have been doing calf raises, similar to how you suggest, for a few years now, a couple of times a week. They do help. So do the Hoka's.

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Rog    1,551

What size are you? I've got some 9k old Claytons I'd sell pretty cheap. 10.5 US. I've had about twenty pairs of hokas. The Claytons are the only ones ever to give me blisters.

I'll send you a pm in case trinube is not interested.

Edited by Rog

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Lostkiwi    151

Replied. I'll give trinube a couple of days. I'm gutted the Claytons didn't work for me. They felt awesome for the first two km before the blisters started!

Onto the tracers now which feel bloody speedy as well. Just think I might be pushing the boundaries running a marathon in them.

The notion of hokas being a slow shoe are rubbish when you start wearing these models. Maybe the Bondi feels slow, but certainly not the more racey models.

Maybe the new Claytons will move the arch back a bees dick and I'll be able to wear them.

Edited by Lostkiwi

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trinube    1,048

Replied. I'll give trinube a couple of days. I'm gutted the Claytons didn't work for me. They felt awesome for the first two km before the blisters started!

 

All good mate, send 'em to Rog. They'd be too big for me. Thanks for the offer though.

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RunBrettRun    1,362

ÃÂ

All good mate, send 'em to Rog. They'd be too big for me. Thanks for the offer though.

Ive got some US9 if they might be more suitable? Have got maybe 500ks in them but I don't use these anymore I'm running in tracers now.

 

If they fit just pm me your address and I can post to you.

Edited by RunBrettRun

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trinube    1,048

Ive got some US9 if they might be more suitable? Have got maybe 500ks in them but I don't use these anymore I'm running in tracers now.

 

If they fit just pm me your address and I can post to you.

 

Thanks, that would be cool. I'm normally about an 8.5/9 so if they fit true to size they'd be worth a shot. Will drop you a PM.

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Slunnie    86

In response to why I don't wear Hoka's.

 

It has nothing to do with Hokas, a lot of those who I train with use and love them.

 

For me, I have been using Nike ever since I can remember, I run well in them and I don't get foot problems in the right ones for me.

 

Being confident that Nike work with my body, or my body works with Nike, I'm inclined not to change from a known to an unknown when I don't have a need to.

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Kiwinoz    60

Also use the Fasttwitch, and have done for many iterations. Guide is my daily trainer. Would like to try the Tracer as potentially a marathon/IM shoe instead of Fastwitch in the hope of providing slightly more relief towards the end of the run. Might need to check out the Infinite too as an option for daily miles.

 

New Balance 150 v3 might be worth a trial; 230g (8.1oz), 6m heel to toe drop, 3mm more stack height than the Fastwitch 7 so possibly a touch more cushioning. The new Fastwitch 8 has shaved off 20g, down from 204g to 184g. I think I will just do a few extra toe curls and calf raises and use Fastwitch 8 at Cairns. I do not think the Hoka tracer has stability which would probably rule me out, I have tried the KInvaras on a few occasions and without a touch of stability I was a broken man.

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willie    608

the 1500s are a favourite of mine at the moment. The only thing I will say, is don't believe a word they say about drops etc...

 

thanks for the input folks.

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Andrew #1    822

I've had 9 pairs of Hokas in the past 6 or so years - including last weeks purchase of two pairs of Constants - which is a very good wide fitting fairly light and fast training shoe. I think the Constant has been discontinued so after these two pairs I'll be shopping for another model - and it looks like the Ahari is the replacement model ...

 

Previously I've owned several paid s of the off road Mafete- a very solid trainer and Bondi's which were a bit narrow for me but still good enough for HIM and IM. As a speed show I've used the Valor - which is light and fast but since that he worn out I've gone back to the Asics Noosa for sprint tris - which I think I prefer.

 

Before Hoka I wore Asics Foundations (4E) for years and before that the Asics MC plus as trainers and DS trainers/Forsters/Noosas for racing.

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stone    55

I have a pair of Clifton 1's, I hate them. They are way too soft and mushy for me. I enjoy cushion in a shoe but also like for it to feel responsive. I've switched to Adidas shoes with boost foam. My long runs are in the Ultra Boost ST, tempo runs and my IM marathon run in the Supernova Glide. Excellent shoes, with a perfect combination of cushion and responsiveness, my only gripe is that Adidas shoes are a touch heavy. If I could find a similar shoe to the Supernova Glide that came in around 8 ounces I'd be in heaven.

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Lostkiwi    151

I have a pair of Clifton 1's, I hate them. They are way too soft and mushy for me. I enjoy cushion in a shoe but also like for it to feel responsive. I've switched to Adidas shoes with boost foam. My long runs are in the Ultra Boost ST, tempo runs and my IM marathon run in the Supernova Glide. Excellent shoes, with a perfect combination of cushion and responsiveness, my only gripe is that Adidas shoes are a touch heavy. If I could find a similar shoe to the Supernova Glide that came in around 8 ounces I'd be in heaven.

That's like comparing apples with oranges. There is nothing mushy about the Clifton 3.

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stone    55

That's like comparing apples with oranges. There is nothing mushy about the Clifton 3.

I thought the sole unit in the 3 was essentially the same as the 1, just that the last/shape is different, also the upper slightly different. If the sole unit is essentially the same I guess I could expect a similar ride?

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Rog    1,551

So I took the Claytons I bought from @Lostkiwi for a spin this morning.

1hr run with a 35min tempo effort in the middle.

I really wanted to like these shoes (and still do!) but as with most reviews I read online, arch blisters were a problem for me as well (and I think for @Lostkiwi too).

On my Nikes I never ever get blisters on my foot no matter how long I run, even if they are brand new so it is not an issue of breaking them in.

Anyone had similar experiences and managed to solve the problem? I saw some suggestions of replacing the inner sole but it seems a bit hit and miss?

Cheers,

Rog

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FFF1077    142
1 hour ago, Rog said:

So I took the Claytons I bought from @Lostkiwi for a spin this morning.

1hr run with a 35min tempo effort in the middle.

I really wanted to like these shoes (and still do!) but as with most reviews I read online, arch blisters were a problem for me as well (and I think for @Lostkiwi too).

On my Nikes I never ever get blisters on my foot no matter how long I run, even if they are brand new so it is not an issue of breaking them in.

Anyone had similar experiences and managed to solve the problem? I saw some suggestions of replacing the inner sole but it seems a bit hit and miss?

Cheers,

Rog

I had that issue with my Stinsons. 

I don't do the laces all the way up(don't use all the holes) and lace them loosely, no more problems ?

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Lostkiwi    151

That's why I sold them to you rog. I've had so many different models of hokas and they are the only pair that have done it. Hence moving on to the tracers. No problems with them, just a bit more minimal than the Claytons I think. Super comfy though!

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stone    55
On 10/03/2017 at 10:00 PM, Lostkiwi said:
On 10/03/2017 at 4:55 PM, stone said:

I have a pair of Clifton 1's, I hate them. They are way too soft and mushy for me. I enjoy cushion in a shoe but also like for it to feel responsive. I've switched to Adidas shoes with boost foam. My long runs are in the Ultra Boost ST, tempo runs and my IM marathon run in the Supernova Glide. Excellent shoes, with a perfect combination of cushion and responsiveness, my only gripe is that Adidas shoes are a touch heavy. If I could find a similar shoe to the Supernova Glide that came in around 8 ounces I'd be in heaven.

That's like comparing apples with oranges. There is nothing mushy about the Clifton 3.

Not sure what that is relevant to. The OP asked if we'd tried Hoka's and gone to something else, why? I think my post is pretty succinct. I didn't like how the 1 felt, way too mushy, the shoes I've switched too are still cushioned but far more responsive even with the higher weight.

Re. the Clifton 3, I wouldn't know because I've never worn them. But I'd suspect that it's still going to be less responsive than something with boost foam. If I wanted to compare a race shoe with boost foam to the race shoe in the Hoka line up (Clifton), then I'd reference the adios zero. Completely different shoes, and I'd much prefer the adios. It's a personal preference thing. Maximal cushion is not my thing, just like it's not the thing for lots of other people as well.

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Slowman    234
On 01/03/2017 at 0:38 PM, roxii said:

 

A few years ago I woudl have said no, as I found the older Hokas to be very cushioning but inherently unstable which I think would only exacerbate any form issues, but now from what I have found they seem to be a slightly more stable platform and not just cushion for cushions sake.

I had the same experience with a pair of Saucony shoes (can't remember the model) when they first introduced the grid. They were shocking to run on trails like Lady Carrington back in the days of the National Park Tri. I've been reading up on Hokas and from the reviews it seems they are quite stable today, I'm thinking of getting some as all my running shoes are 10+ years old and are pretty dead to run in, even though they have been not used. (Who keeps stuff for that long?? :lol:)

On 01/03/2017 at 1:46 PM, goughy said:

Local tri shop up here sells them too. What I've found interesting is what people are willing to try out. I know of people up here that have been wearing Altra's, or the On Clouds (the racing models, less supportive) that are now trying Hoka's. I don't know if it's the 'triathlete willing to try the new stuff' bandwagon or not, but you are talking about dramatically different tech in the shoes?...

I reckon triathletes as a group of consumers are more willing to try innovations because a lot of them are far less established. By that I mean they are new to the sport and on a journey of discovering their capabilities.  So they are more willing to try new things because it is all new anyway. Sports like running and cycling I think tend to be more stayed because there are many people that are rusted on and there is a group think and a belief they know what works best already (sometimes rightly so). However plenty of runners have converted to Hokas to it seems from reading reviews by them.

How do Hokas fit in relation to other brands? For example in Asics I wear a US11.5/Eur46 but in Saucony it's US11/Eur45.

 

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Slowman    234
On 15/04/2017 at 6:43 AM, Slowman said:

How do Hokas fit in relation to other brands? For example in Asics I wear a US11.5/Eur46 but in Saucony it's US11/Eur45.

I'm thinking from what I've read I'll go with the larger of the 2 EUR46, sound about right?

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