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willie

Why do you/don't you wear Hoka's?

  

70 members have voted

  1. 1. The models of Hoka I wear are

    • Stinson
      8
    • Arahi
      5
    • Clayton
      5
    • Speed Instict
      1
    • Bondi
      11
    • Tracer
      3
    • Clifton
      12
    • Vanquish
      2
    • Speedgoat
      2
    • Challenger
      3
    • Other
      11
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      27
  2. 2. I buy my Hokas......

    • Online - Overseas
      6
    • Online - Australian Stores
      21
    • Bricks and Mortar Store
      20
    • Other
      3
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      26
  3. 3. When I need to replace my Hokas I will replace them wiith...

    • The Same Model Hoka (i.e Clifton 3 with Clifton 3)
      13
    • Newer version of same model Hoka (I.e Clifton replaced with Clifton 4)
      24
    • Similar style shoe (Altra, Vasque, Brooks Transcend)
      3
    • A more "mainstream" shoe
      3
    • I don't wear Hoka's
      27


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Morning Trannies!

 

As you'll get to know (disclaimer?) I'm about to open my own running store very shortly (hopefully). I'm looking into product selection and thought it'd be a good idea to ask the masses about things I don't know a lot about (with Roxii's permission).

 

As you'll be well aware, I've only come around to Hoka's in the last 6 months or so (I've even got them to Shuffla and Bored@ recently). I was always a non believer and I've always worn very minimalist shoes. But after talking a a few people and one very very good coach about benefits he's seen for both himself and some of his athletes, I think there is a place for them, for some people.

 

So I'd like to know the answers to the above questions and any other thoughts you might have on Hoka's. Would even appreciate those who have worn Hoka's and didn't like them or changed to something different to come forward and tell me why.

 

As a reward, everyone who contributes to this thread in a positive way will go into a hat and Roxii will pick one lucky person that get a free pair of shoes and socks from www.runwith.com.au (website will be down until Friday Lunch time).

 

Thanks,

willie@runwith.com.au (aka Hiltz)

 

p.s hang in there for the official store launch in a couple of weeks, will be a nice discount to be had. In the meantime, if you need something running related, shoot me a message and I'll see if I can work it out for you.

Edited by willie

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I really struggle with shoes because I run wonky.

 

When I first got into running I went to a Nike shop in the UK (big mistake) and they stuck me in a pair that almost crippled me.

 

So then I went to a running shop and they put me in a pair of Brooks Ghost 7s. It was a revelation. I ran my first Half Marathon in them (love how that distance is now just a cheeky training run), and trained and ran my first Olympic in them and then needed to replace them for a marathon. I was very sad to find very few places selling them any more so I thought I had better upgrade to the Ghost 8. Injured myself for two weeks after just 5k in them! Horrible shoe. So I then went through the process of buying up any leftover stock of Ghost 7s I could find. I've still got a couple of new pairs which I'm saving for Sydney Marathon this year...

 

Long term that's not going to work. So I'm currently running in a pair of Asics. I'm not in love with them but they're a lot better than the Ghost 8s.

 

From the sounds of it I could do with trying Hoka's but need someone knowledgeable to talk to me about which model would suit...

 

What would be REALLY useful is an online tool of "If you liked that then you'll like this" so people who ran well in a Ghost 7 could go and get a good suggestion for the similar shoe from other providers.

 

C

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What would be REALLY useful is an online tool of "If you liked that then you'll like this" so people who ran well in a Ghost 7 could go and get a good suggestion for the similar shoe from other providers.

 

I'd love to be able to do something like that, but everyone is different. I do have a tool where I will recommend similar shoes (so a New Balance 1080 is similar to a Ghost for example). But they're slightly different shapes, have vastly different uppers and feel completely different. There is no gaurantee they'll feel better or the same as the Ghost 7.

 

If you need to ask a few questions happy for you to give me a call or email.

 

Thanks,

Willie

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I have Stinsons. I don't like to run in them, because of how the huge sole affects your running, It doesn't feel as natural and as fluid to run in as a standard running shoe or a racing flat and they're certainly not quick. But I can run long distance (20km+) in them without getting sore, so I'll continue to buy them or similar shoes. Although I would like to explore alternatives. I think stocking Hokas is a safe bet, they are hugely popular.

Edited by zed

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Why do ? I'm old. I've had a femur stress fracture.

Hokas. I don't like em. Esp the Bondi as I like race flats and they are a million miles away from them. . But I'll never run in them (flats) again. Think the Cliftons are a good shoe. Like the look of the Clayton's but I'm now injured and fat so comeback is in Bondis.

Edited by Mjainoz

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Good luck with the store. I'm pretty sure HoKa are mainstream in the tri world now.

 

Yep, if you've been around a long time and know triathlon well. A lot of newbies to both running and triathlon know nothing of them and are reluctant to try them because they're so different to those "mainstream" brands (aka Rebel Sport brands).

 

I'm also trying to find a way of gettting their head around why a Hoka might be good for them when they first start out (I kinda thing they'd be a good choice for those who may not have great technique when first starting out).

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I think stocking Hokas is a safe bet, they are hugely popular.

 

It's not wether I will or wont stock Hoka (given the chance I will), it's more along the lines of the fitting process, what types of people and why would I fit Hoka's (I'm looking at reasons why I should be fitting more of them). MJA's response was one of those reasons, your's too for long runs etc and less impact on the body is another. That's good feedback! Thanks!

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I have Stinsons. I don't like to run in them, because of how the huge sole affects your running, It doesn't feel as natural and as fluid to run in as a standard running shoe or a racing flat and they're certainly not quick. But I can run long distance (20km+) in them without getting sore, so I'll continue to buy them or similar shoes. Although I would like to explore alternatives. I think stocking Hokas is a safe bet, they are hugely popular.

I don't know much about shoes. What's the difference between a fast shoe and not? What difference would a fast shoe make in say a sprint tri?

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I'm also trying to find a way of gettting their head around why a Hoka might be good for them when they first start out (I kinda thing they'd be a good choice for those who may not have great technique when first starting out).

 

A few years ago I woudl have said no, as I found the older Hokas to be very cushioning but inherently unstable which I think would only exacerbate any form issues, but now from what I have found they seem to be a slightly more stable platform and not just cushion for cushions sake.

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I'm getting to the point now where they have been on the market long enough to consider giving them a go. I like to allow radical departures from the normal a chance to be experimented on by others and wait to see if any adverse affects occur before jumping in. I'm off to buy a new set of runners tomorrow, next set in around 6 months time is when I will be looking at feedback and give them a go if the response is positive

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I'd love to be able to do something like that, but everyone is different. I do have a tool where I will recommend similar shoes (so a New Balance 1080 is similar to a Ghost for example). But they're slightly different shapes, have vastly different uppers and feel completely different. There is no gaurantee they'll feel better or the same as the Ghost 7.

 

 

Thanks Willie. Once I've burnt through my last hoarded pairs of Ghost 7s then I will be in touch.

 

On the above the way to do it (with my work hat on) would be to try and to a really large consumer survey and people to choose all the shoes that they have liked running in... we could then run a simple machine learning algorithm on it and actually build quite a nice prediction model... I would be tempted to try and do this purely from an academic interest point of view!

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I don't know much about shoes. What's the difference between a fast shoe and not? What difference would a fast shoe make in say a sprint tri?

 

“effect of carrying extra weight on the foot during running has been measured at 1 percent [increased aerobic demand] per 100 g per foot.
Not sure how accurate that is, but I run quicker in my Asics Hyperspeeds (200g) than my Noosas and Pegasus (both around 280g). Perhaps 2/3s per km quicker? But they're only good for sprints and possibly OD (for me anyway).
Edited by zed

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I don't know the answer to this question, but is it a bad idea to recommend Hokas to someone who isn't injury prone and hasn't got any bio-mechanical issues? From my perspective, they serve as a tool to minimize injuries and DOMS, but other than that they're not particularly good running shoes and not great to run in.

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Â

âeffect of carrying extra weight on the foot during running has been measured at 1 percent [increased aerobic demand] per 100 g per foot.â

Â

Not sure how accurate that is, but I run quicker in my Asics Hyperspeeds (200g) than my Noosas and Pegasus (both around 280g). Perhaps 2/3s per km quicker? But they're only good for sprints and possibly OD (for me anyway).

Oh okay - free speed is always good.

 

I haven't done a short tri where that would make a difference though.

 

Maybe something to think about if I do a sort tri again

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On the above the way to do it (with my work hat on) would be to try and to a really large consumer survey and people to choose all the shoes that they have liked running in... we could then run a simple machine learning algorithm on it and actually build quite a nice prediction model... I would be tempted to try and do this purely from an academic interest point of view!

 

Mate if you want to jump on board and do something like this with data I'd be more than interested. Are you Sydney based?

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I think the Sunshine Coast is the new home of the Hoka. Lots of people up there wearing them. Stocked at the local tri shop, Allez Sport.

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I tried em.

Liked em.

But they didn't have the support I needed and they broke me eventually.

If there is a newer model with a support arch, I could try again, mainly because I've been forced back to Asics.

so, if there is now a Hoka with something like a GT2000 type support, let me know.

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Im not a fast runner and am on the heavier side at 92kg, so im a bit of a plodder and have a wide foot, normally i have worn NB 860 in a 4E width and have just kept getting the newer versions as they are released, but i didn't like the V7 they have bought out and now that im doing longer runs they were not offering me the comfort i am wanting / needing. so i got talking to the Hoka guys online after several of my friends recommended them to me and the Hoka guys recommended the Arahi Wide for me - I have done 4 runs in them and im not sure they are for me, they are not bad but there is a slight bit of discomfort on the outer left foot, seems to be easing each run i do but i will keep an eye on it. i like the extra cushioning, i really like it so hopefully over my next few long runs i feel the comfort in the left foot come back.

 

I intend on trying the Altra Paradigm's also, I've been recommended them by several people with more foot and shoe knowledge than ill ever have.

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I intend on trying the Altra Paradigm's also, I've been recommended them by several people with more foot and shoe knowledge than ill ever have.

 

The Paradigm is a very very different shoe to what you've been wearing and one problem I can forsee, is that the Altra is a zero drop max style shoe. Bigger guys like us actually turn it into a negative drop shoe if you land anywhere near your heel (I run reasonably "flat" footed and felt it wasn't right). However, I can't get Altra's to work for me because the shape as well and this would have played a small part also. Just doesn't suit my foot in any way (I've got shallow, narrow feet).

Edited by willie

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Ive got a trail / off road pair (cant remember the name). Feel great on the trails but not enough drop & now my brand new orthotics dont fit them properly. May have contributed to my achilles issue which Ive not had before. On podiatrist instructions I'll only use them for 1 of my 3 runs once Im back on solid ground (deep water running at the mo) & may not buy another pair.

Edit to say that many of my running buddies have them & love them, but disappointed Ive not had their luck with them

Edited by surfer101

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Local tri shop up here sells them too. What I've found interesting is what people are willing to try out. I know of people up here that have been wearing Altra's, or the On Clouds (the racing models, less supportive) that are now trying Hoka's. I don't know if it's the 'triathlete willing to try the new stuff' bandwagon or not, but you are talking about dramatically different tech in the shoes?

 

I'd love to see you do an interview with roxii on your store once you're up and going! We know it wouldn't be about promoting yourself for free etc, cause we all know you. But I'd love to find out more about why you've gone down this route, what you plan to stock etc and what sort of services.

 

I think it could be a tough industry to break in to because of the big generics out there, that will fit people based on a cookie cutter set of criteria and a thumbs with left at the front of your shoes ;)

 

An example of what I mean, is our local store stocks brands like Hoka, Altra, On and Mizuno (you don't see much of Mizuno in stores up here), so he's offering what others don't, but he doesn't have the regulars you see everywhere. Will you be going that way?

 

Sorry to thread jack, just a thought.

 

If I hadn't had the issue with my knee cap, I think I'd be all over these. For people like me who don't care about brand or image, and just want to be able to run regardless of time etc, the extra cushioning might have kept me going longer.

 

But the are so many opposing theories on all this out there, and every one of them send to have their merits while often contradicting each other. And the wrong advice to the wrong person could have a lasting affect on them. Would love to know more of your approach.

 

Oh, and get xtenex laces!

Edited by goughy
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I like them, just for the cushioning. I do find they are unstable though unless you are on flat roads (Bondi's).

I think I'll try the off road shoes they have next.

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I tried them on in the store (FootPro, Malvern, VIC). They felt OK and when I tested them on the in-store treadmill they felt OK. However I also tried Saucony Kinvaras and they felt great both standing and on the treadmill - so I bought the Kinvaras.

 

At some point I'm intending to go back to FootPro and test some of the newer Hoka models.

 

I usually have around 12 pairs of runners on rotation. Trail Runners, Racing flats, elastic laced ones for triathlon, 2 pairs at work, etc.

 

If I'm buying another pair of the same model I will simply look for the best price online, However if the model changes, or there is a new shoe I'm interested in I will go to an actual store, try and on and purchase them if they feel good.

 

I am picky about what running stores I go to. I want a specialist running store where the owner knows what he/she is talking about and stocks the more niche style of runners. Having an in-store treadmill and video analysis is a big plus

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I am picky about what running stores I go to. I want a specialist running store where the owner knows what he/she is talking about and stocks the more niche style of runners. Having an in-store treadmill and video analysis is a big plus

I've "fit" over 3,000 people I reckon. I had some very good training through the Uni of Roehampton in the U.K. Going back to the states to do a further 2 weeks on running biomechanics where they have a reasonable emphasis on shoes just to make sure I can know as much as possible. The rest I think is natural ability.

 

As for the video analysis stuff, as you say it's great if folks know how to use it and are good at looking at you as a whole, but a lot merely look at your feet. I've found that the 7 stores I been into with this, there's only 2 sales reps that were good at this process.

 

I had one very prominent store in NSW reccomend an adrenaline to me when I turned up wearing a Nike Terra Kiger 2 that I'd told the person I'd just run a 100km ultra in. Needless to say, I was dumbfounded.

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As mentioned I have just started running in the Hoka Bondi purchased from Willie.

 

I have previously been running in on clouds. At this stage I'm happy with them as training shoe but I won't be racing in them.

 

They are comfy & I seem to pull up better after long runs. They just feel big & slow on my feet, I'm keen to try a "smaller" shoe in their range.

 

Or try something else before my next race. TBH I'll prob try something based on Willie's recommendation.

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As mentioned I have just started running in the Hoka Bondi purchased from Willie.

 

I have previously been running in on clouds. At this stage I'm happy with them as training shoe but I won't be racing in them.

 

They are comfy & I seem to pull up better after long runs. They just feel big & slow on my feet, I'm keen to try a "smaller" shoe in their range.

 

Or try something else before my next race. TBH I'll prob try something based on Willie's recommendation.

 

 

Yeah I'm in the same boat. Keen to try a diet-Hoka. Lighter with not such a massive sole.

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I got a pair of Clifton 3 and really wanted to like them, but concluded that they just don't suit my foot and running biomechanics. Doesn't mean they aren't good shoes for some people. My lesson with those - and some other makes and models - is to stick with what is comfortable and works, not necessarily what is popular. For me that is Nike shoes...all of them and especially Pegasus.

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I have been keen to try them but honestly would have no idea what model to go for.

 

I have issues with my left foot going numb when running no matter what shoe I wear so hoping the extra cushioning may help that.

 

The problem is locally there is no where to try them on and give it a whirl, might just have to pony up the cash on line and see how i go!

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I have been keen to try them but honestly would have no idea what model to go for.

 

I have issues with my left foot going numb when running no matter what shoe I wear so hoping the extra cushioning may help that.

 

The problem is locally there is no where to try them on and give it a whirl, might just have to pony up the cash on line and see how i go!

 

You need to try em on mate. They are a whacky fit. I had to go a whole size up, usually 9s, had to go 10s as the Stinsons are very narrow. Even the 10s feel narrow and a bit tight, I have to have the laces looseish.

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I tried em.

Liked em.

But they didn't have the support I needed and they broke me eventually.

If there is a newer model with a support arch, I could try again, mainly because I've been forced back to Asics.

so, if there is now a Hoka with something like a GT2000 type support, let me know.

 

The new Arahi would be your entry back into Hoka.

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Or try something else before my next race. TBH I'll prob try something based on Willie's recommendation.

 

Happy to sort you out when you get to that point. I reckon you'd want to try the Tracer. I think it makes me run weird (but hey, my favorite shoe is the T3-4-5-6-7 from Brooks)

 

Yeah I'm in the same boat. Keen to try a diet-Hoka. Lighter with not such a massive sole.

 

Same as above, if/when I get Hoka's I'll make sure I sort you out ;)

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You need to try em on mate. They are a whacky fit. I had to go a whole size up, usually 9s, had to go 10s as the Stinsons are very narrow. Even the 10s feel narrow and a bit tight, I have to have the laces looseish.

 

A couple of the shoes come in a 'wide' fit now, the Bondi and Arahi. I would expect that more models in wide will follow.

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Yeah I'm in the same boat. Keen to try a diet-Hoka. Lighter with not such a massive sole.

 

Clifton and Clayton will be the best bet, or Tracer if you want full race spec from 5km to half-mara.

 

I race in the Tracer (up to half distance) and the Clayton (full distance) if anyone is interested. Most of the the other Hoka pros do as well; Heather Jackson (3rd in Kona) races in Clayton, Cyril Viennot in the Tracer, Tim O'Donnell in the Tracer, a bunch of ITU athletes like Katie Zafares & Ben Kanute (US Olympians) race in the Tracer, Luke McKenzie in the Tracer...

 

Hoka is a very progressive brand. Innovating with each new shoe that comes out, and actually listening to the market and hearing what people are saying what they need to do to improve or alter the fit or performance. It's not going to be for everyone, but the shoe counts that came in last year suggest that people are loving them in the tri-world.

 

http://running.competitor.com/2016/10/news/2016-ironman-triathlon-world-championships-running-shoe-count_157090

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Voted - I wear mine for road or firetrail running only. I moved to them after hearing about them from others with knee/hip/ankle injuries, at the time I was massively overweight (now I am just overweight). It's saved my ankles as well as helping me complete my first 2 road half marathons.

 

For anything more technical I am in a pair of Asics Venture 5's, I saw some folks trying to negotiate knapsack lap race in hokas....

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I have been keen to try them but honestly would have no idea what model to go for.

 

I have issues with my left foot going numb when running no matter what shoe I wear so hoping the extra cushioning may help that.

 

 

I would suggest that a Clifton is a safe bet. If you have success in that, then you'll have a better idea to either stick with go, go to a more comfort focussed shoe like the Bondi, Arahi, Vanquish etc, or dial it down a notch to a Clayton or Tracer.

 

With regards to numb feet, try to lace your shoes so that you skip the middle one or two lace holes over the tongue. Sometime if laces are too tight over the cuneiforms it can quite easily cut blood supply to the foot.

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Voted - I wear mine for road or firetrail running only. I moved to them after hearing about them from others with knee/hip/ankle injuries, at the time I was massively overweight (now I am just overweight). It's saved my ankles as well as helping me complete my first 2 road half marathons.

 

For anything more technical I am in a pair of Asics Venture 5's, I saw some folks trying to negotiate knapsack lap race in hokas....

 

For technical trail running, the Speed Instinct is a massive win. I just looked up Venture 5's, they look roughly like the equivalent of the Challenger, which is Hokas best selling trail shoe (also amazing). I can see any advantages of the Venture 5 over either the Speed Instinct or Challenger, but each to their own.

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Clifton and Clayton will be the best bet, or Tracer if you want full race spec from 5km to half-mara.

 

I race in the Tracer (up to half distance) and the Clayton (full distance) if anyone is interested. Most of the the other Hoka pros do as well; Heather Jackson (3rd in Kona) races in Clayton, Cyril Viennot in the Tracer, Tim O'Donnell in the Tracer, a bunch of ITU athletes like Katie Zafares & Ben Kanute (US Olympians) race in the Tracer, Luke McKenzie in the Tracer...

 

Hoka is a very progressive brand. Innovating with each new shoe that comes out, and actually listening to the market and hearing what people are saying what they need to do to improve or alter the fit or performance. It's not going to be for everyone, but the shoe counts that came in last year suggest that people are loving them in the tri-world.

 

http://running.competitor.com/2016/10/news/2016-ironman-triathlon-world-championships-running-shoe-count_157090

 

 

Cool thanks Burgs.

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I found them good when you are in a moon boot for the other foot.

A member here sent me an old pair as I thought they would even me up while wearing the boot. Helped a lot with potential back issues etc.

Only issues had doing this was the big red line it would put on top of my foot on the medial side and these were a size up from normal shoes.

Tried running in them once out of boot just didnt feel right at this stage for me.

Did try the Claytons last year just too narrow.

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Road runs > 10 km and all trail running I do now in Hoka's. I find that I am not as sore after a long run when wearing Hokas. I find the extra cushioning great when trail running, you do not feel the rocks under your feet.

 

I still do runs <10km in standard NB running shoes. I think that by mixing it up between shoes I can reduce over use injuries as the different types of shoes cause you to change form and the way your foot lands. In normal shoes I am more of a heel lander, in Hoka's more mid foot lander. The wear patterns on my NB and Hokas are very different.

 

Since changing to Hoka's my PF has not reoccurred. Late last year I stopped running in Hoka's and my PF came back. I have switched back to Hoka's.

 

My biggest gripe with Hoka's is that they wear out much quicker than other shoes, particularly trail running. I am going to try other Hoka models and other similar shoes in different brands to see if they last longer.

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Oh okay - free speed is always good.

 

I haven't done a short tri where that would make a difference though.

 

Maybe something to think about if I do a sort tri again

IMO. fast vs slow shoe. Couple of secs a k I think. Depends on how bad your form is. two sides to that. If they hold you up too much it takes to long to go through the gait cycle. Collapse too much and you loose time there. Optimal shoe depends on you and how fast you are running.

Weight is an issue. And then there is the phycological aspect.

Buy some. Have fun.

Edited by Mjainoz

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Road runs > 10 km and all trail running I do now in Hoka's. I find that I am not as sore after a long run when wearing Hokas. I find the extra cushioning great when trail running, you do not feel the rocks under your feet.

Â

I still do runs <10km in standard NB running shoes. I think that by mixing it up between shoes I can reduce over use injuries as the different types of shoes cause you to change form and the way your foot lands. In normal shoes I am more of a heel lander, in Hoka's more mid foot lander. The wear patterns on my NB and Hokas are very different.

Â

Since changing to Hoka's my PF has not reoccurred. Â Late last year I stopped running in Hoka's and my PF came back. I have switched back to Hoka's.

Â

My biggest gripe with Hoka's is that they wear out much quicker than other shoes, particularly trail running. I am going to try other Hoka models and other similar shoes in different brands to see if they last longer.

 

If the PF came back you never addressed the issue. My thoughts would be Rehab while you are running in the Hokas.

Isotonic single calf raises on edge off step weighted 3 secs up 3 secs down with your feet on towel trying to grab towel. 3 sets of 8 each daily for a few weeks would help greatly

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I don't wear Hokas because my podiatrist advised me against them. I doubt from an anti-Hoka point of view, rather probably my feet pov. I've pretty much worn Brookes or Mizunos the last few years. He suggested this time for me to go for Mizuno Enigmas. So far so good. I have incredibly flexible (aka unstable) ankles with only 1 ligament really working in one.

 

Great work Willie on doing the research etc. I wish all shoe fitters were 1/2 as knowledgeable. Good luck with the shop.

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I've looked but not tried Hokas particularly for the reduced DOMS that they are supposed to help with. I'm a slow and heavy runner and have been in Adrenelines last 8 years or so. Have avoided any significant injuries so I'm sticking with what works for the present.

 

Sent from my GT-I9507 using Tapatalk

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I have been keen to try them but honestly would have no idea what model to go for.

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I have issues with my left foot going numb when running no matter what shoe I wear so hoping the extra cushioning may help that.

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The problem is locally there is no where to try them on and give it a whirl, might just have to pony up the cash on line and see how i go!

What size are ya? If the same as me you could give mine a whirl. I have a few different ones

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I've always run in Asics (GT2000 for training, DS Trainers for racing) and they have served me well. I know there are equivalent shoes in other brands, but these work for me and I haven't been bothered changing so far. I've been tempted (and still am) to try Hoka's due to good reports I've heard, but have been put off due to price, not knowing which model to go for, and that they just look a bit goofy (maybe new models are looking better?).

Anyway, my newest DS Trainers have an issue where they are rubbing in a weird spot and I can't run more than a couple of km's in races (no socks) without getting blisters (never had this before), so I'm thinking about changing. So, for those with Hoka + Asics knowledge, which models should I be looking at to replace my Asics?

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I love my Valours, as a medium, cushy but fast (for me) shoe.

 

The stinsons are good for long slow runs but a bit tiring on the feet if theres a lot of walking involved (like 100km events) as the sole is thick and takes some bending.

 

The valours are also a soft and forgiving but supportive upper.

 

Challengers are softer with a pissweak upper for a trail shoe.

 

I love the drop really. They are really midway between a traditional 12-15mm or the altra zero drop. Which for me really works.

 

Old rapanuis are stupidly narrow. So iv got 2 pairs up for grabs. Size US mens 9.5 if you're keen to try em.

 

I get loads of kms out of mine. Almost 1000kms on stinson ATR s and Valours, even tho the Valours are a road shoe and i normally run trails

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I've worn Hoka pretty much since they came out. I was running ultras at the time and hated hard rock plates in the sole of most trail shoes. Decided that trail shoes are rarely needed so went to more cushioning.

 

Struggled with lack of feel for the road but the new Ahari are better. Feel a bit speedier in them compared to the old Constant.

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