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Peter

What's with so many drownings? Nsw

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My mum (RIP) used to teach "free learn to swim" at the local council pool about 40 years ago. She was a pretty ordinary swimmer herself, but her and my sister (who was a State level swimmer) did it every week after swim club. The pool was closed about 30 years ago but it's such a shame that these sorts of community offerings don't exist any more. I'd be more than happy to spend a couple of hours a week helping out kids (or adults) who couldn't afford lessons.

 

The problem no doubt, would be 1) liability and 2) upsetting the swim schools who work out of the pools. Having said that, I have a couple of excellent contacts at the council so it might be worthwhile raising.

Edited by trinube
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My Mum taught my sister and I to 'swim' at the local pool and got us to a point where Dad could teach us much more on weekends and swim with him and then we went on to regular lessons.

 

It was years later that we found out my Mum hates the water and couldn't really swim herself. However she took us twice a week in summer when we were little.

 

I asked her how she did it and she said she just looked around and saw what the other Mums were doing and copied that. I always thought this was very selfless, she must have hated every second of that.

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I've recently been doing some work that revolves around drowning prevention/rescue. The statistics are insane, over 1000 people a day die from drowning. The numbers are skewed between developed countries and others of course.

 

I am amazed, even in the UK about how many younger parents do not have an emphasis on teaching their kids to swim, mainly because a lot of them can't swim themselves.

 

We've taken ours to Water Babies ever since she was 10 weeks old. Costs a fortune (£160 every 10 wks) but for us, it's not even a decision on whether it's worth it.

Similar here mate.

My daughter does swimming lessons, not only for the health and social side of it. It's a bloody life skill. Can I afford it? Not really but I just take the money from something else at that time. Rather eat eggs on toast for a week than have a non swimming daughter. Especially after I nearly drowned twice as a young man because I was never given lessons.

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As important as it is, it is expensive too. ÃÂ My daughter and son's winter sports cost about $150/season. ÃÂ They only get new kit once every 2 years at most atm (only because they are growing). ÃÂ They get about an hour of play and one or more training sessions a week included. ÃÂ Swimming lessons were costing over $100/term for 30min, maybe 45mins for the older kid.

ÃÂ

I know it's an essential part of aussie life, which is why ours were in the pool from under 12mnths of age. ÃÂ But it is expensive, especially for those on lower incomes.

If u can swim, surely theres u tube videos to teach them yourself?

 

Mum and dad taught me water competency. Well before utube. Then squad for real swimming as such.

 

Then again, soccer for sport is fun. Swimming is a life saving skill. As a non parent i cant understand how sport cost can be compared.

 

You dont have to ace a swim meet to not drown

 

Not attacking u goughy. Your post just had the comparisons for reference.

Edited by The Turtle

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Maybe I wasn't completely clear in my post? None of that made a difference to me, cause while it was expensive for us, both our kids did tonnes of swimming lessons as kids. We both totally agreed that it was not just a fun activity, but something that was vitally important for any kids, let alone kids in australia. I was just making the point of how expensive it is as a semi justification for how poor swimming skills really are. I mean, my kids are ok. But at school swimming they are in the better swimmers around (not competitive level, but always top group).

 

And how poor some adults are at swimming, there is no way they'd have the confidence or ability to teach their kids to swim. I mean, face it. We still have people doing tri that get the shivers when a race swim isn't wetsuit legal!

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Both mine learnt to swim as little kids, but it was never as a sport or recreational activity. We had them taught so they didn't drown. If they'd wanted to continue as a sport they could have, but that wasn't the original intention.

 

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Weird - behind paywall if you use the link but when I search "Cape Woolamai rip herald sun" it comes up as accessible??

 

 

found this online - the video is down a bit

link

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My Dad taught me to swim at the beach, was doing it before I can remember and it didn't cost a cent. Anyone who has seen my swim splits will know that technique for fast swimming was not on the training plan but I am confident I won't drown in pretty much any conditions.

 

Unfortunately a lot of kids, especially those recently arrived from countries without a beach culture don't have this opportunity. In a country like Australia, where the vast majority live on the coast and we have more swimming pools per-capita than anywhere, water survival skills need to be much higher on the public agenda.

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found this online - the video is down a bit

 

link

 

Got stuck in the same rip twice (3yrs apart) at Birubi Beach Port Stephens some years back. That was when I could swim 1km in under 16mins, but I still got a nasty wakeup call into how people die.

 

It was after the lifesaver had left, and I was doing a bit of a swim out to a buoy about 200m offshore for training. Got out to the buoy real fast, then tried to come back and after 100m being OK was suddenly going nowhere. Tried to swim in harder, HR went through the roof and panic set in as I realised I could not swim against the current, waves kept crashing over my head, was struggling for air.

 

Gave myself an uppercut, calmed the panic else I knew I was dead and started very easily breaststroking in at an angle. This preserved energy & got my HR down. Did this till I touched sand.

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Got stuck in the same rip twice (3yrs apart) at Birubi Beach Port Stephens some years back. That was when I could swim 1km in under 16mins, but I still got a nasty wakeup call into how people die.

 

Shout out to Chambo, that's his home beach and he's heavily involved with the SLSA up there.

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Got stuck in the same rip twice (3yrs apart) at Birubi Beach Port Stephens some years back. That was when I could swim 1km in under 16mins, but I still got a nasty wakeup call into how people die.

 

It was after the lifesaver had left, and I was doing a bit of a swim out to a buoy about 200m offshore for training. Got out to the buoy real fast, then tried to come back and after 100m being OK was suddenly going nowhere. Tried to swim in harder, HR went through the roof and panic set in as I realised I could not swim against the current, waves kept crashing over my head, was struggling for air.

 

Gave myself an uppercut, calmed the panic else I knew I was dead and started very easily breaststroking in at an angle. This preserved energy & got my HR down. Did this till I touched sand.

There were 2 of us doing swim training in Tallebudgera Creek once. We were basically swimming stationary against the current. We were both sub 20min 1500m swimmers and were going flat out to stay were we were on the outgoing tide.

A family wandered down to the edge just upstream of us, and within minutes, were were pulling 2 x under 10's out of the water. Why do people even contemplate letting non-swimmers play in water like that? The parents were only just raising the alarm as we got to the edge with them. If we weren't there, there was nothing between them & the mouth of the creek.

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The reason I don't teach her(ex wife is not a swimmer) is that after a few minutes she doesn't listen to me [emoji1][emoji1][emoji1] she just tells me that she'd rather play Mermaids instead [emoji1][emoji1][emoji1] at least at the lessons she switches on and learns. I do give her positive feedback and tips on how I do it. When we swim together I over emphasize technique and she has asked me why I do this and that....so she does observe correct techniques done by me.

 

 

Wish the proper skills and techniques transferred to my swimming [emoji1][emoji1][emoji1]‍♂️

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There are so many good tutorials available to teach your kids to swim yourself. Cost is not an issue really. Laurie Lawrence for example is always putting up links from his swim schools.

 

In my opinion, at the end of the day it comes down to time in the water more than anything. I have one mum who has a very whiney young fella in the water at lesson time, but she is at the pool 3 afternoons a week while her daughter trains and doesn't get in the pool with the little one to run through what we do in lessons. What a wast of 3 x 90 minute sessions. Practice swimming for even 10-15 minutes, play and have fun with your kids for the rest of it. I just don't understand.

 

As an aside, I had one family ring me last week and withdraw their kids from lessons as they will be doing Little Athletics, which starts after the pool closes at the end of April....Their youngest is still a drowning risk....

Edited by Ronnie

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39 year old bloke drowned at my local beach this afternoon - not sure what happened, the water wasn't rough but he was found floating face down and was not able to be resuscitated :-(

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About a year ago one of the regular and experienced B&B swimmers died mid-swim. If ever there is a place to get into trouble, surrounded by competent swimmers, many of whom are active surf life savers, is as good as it gets. Two people saw this fellow go unresponsive, got him to the nearest dry land and continued resuscitation until the ambulance came. The official cause of death was drowning as he had breathed in water, but the rescuers know that something else had rendered him unconscious first. Probably a heart attack.

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Both my kids could swim 50m free by the age of 5. In all my failings as a parent this was one goal I achieved. They don't love it today (12 and 15), never had interest in training. But they place in school carnivals and are competent in the surf. Tick one box off

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Just heard on the news that there's been 10 drownings since Christmas Eve, 3 on New year's Day alone!  Bloody hell.

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1 hour ago, goughy said:

Just heard on the news that there's been 10 drownings since Christmas Eve, 3 on New year's Day alone!  Bloody hell.

42 in the last month.

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Globally, drownings are well over 1000 per day.  I did a brief stint with RNLI,  the numbers are staggering.

Edited by FatPom
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A lot of drownings at beaches by people who should know better really comes down to familiarity of the beach or your beach and making the right assessment. At the Beach where our beach house is there is always a rip unless its a milk pond. The beach where everyone swims/surfs is in a corner of a long beach but when there is surf the water has to get back out and when it does it follows the rocks out to the point. I know it well and all surfers use the rip to get out. When I want a good body surf in big surf I just dive into the rip and lay on my back...... The rip is so powerful I don't need to swim. But knowing this beach I know the rip drags me out and across which is where I would then catch another big set back in. Great fun.

My kids are taught the same.... and I to this day still ask them to tell me where the rips are - as there are always several along the beach.

 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, IronmanFoz said:

A lot of drownings at beaches by people who should know better really comes down to familiarity of the beach or your beach and making the right assessment. At the Beach where our beach house is there is always a rip unless its a milk pond. The beach where everyone swims/surfs is in a corner of a long beach but when there is surf the water has to get back out and when it does it follows the rocks out to the point. I know it well and all surfers use the rip to get out. When I want a good body surf in big surf I just dive into the rip and lay on my back...... The rip is so powerful I don't need to swim. But knowing this beach I know the rip drags me out and across which is where I would then catch another big set back in. Great fun.

My kids are taught the same.... and I to this day still ask them to tell me where the rips are - as there are always several along the beach.

 

 

 

 

 This is great. I wish I was so confident. I'm scared of swimming at the beach and will rarely go out where I can't touch..... unless I'm racing a triathlon, then I don't care at all and the swim is my favourite part!!

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12 minutes ago, Cranky said:

I'm scared of swimming at the beach and will rarely go out where I can't touch..

Then get out to the dam every chance you get while you are on leave. Get used to the feeling of being in open water to lose that fear. If you want to feel confident in the surf, then toy with the idea of joining a surf club. Yes it will take some of your time, but they are great people, perform an incredible service to the community, and you can even compete in their carnivals.

ps: the girls might like to join nippers too.

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People can't swim for sh!t then go and swim in a RIP on a messy day at the beach. Or get pissed and go swimming in a filthy lake. People drown because they do stupid things in silly places with little to no ability.

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The problem is people who can’t swim go to the beach and enter the surf in the calmest area between where the waves are breaking. Unfortunately this is normally where the rip is so they get in trouble 

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18 minutes ago, Limited said:

The problem is people who can’t swim go to the beach and enter the surf in the calmest area between where the waves are breaking. Unfortunately this is normally where the rip is so they get in trouble 

That's true. I always forced it on to my kids that they swim between the flags. There are people with a lot more surf sense than them deciding where it was best for them to swim. 

Myself, I may swim elsewhere, but I'll never go into the water without standing there for at least 5 minutes watching the surf, seeing where the waves are breaking, where the currents & rips are going, and working out exactly where I want to swim and what the rips are like near there. I also know I can swim for an hour or more, I won't panic, and I can float to wherever and swim back in.

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Done here our surf club now runs a sister program with the nippers , it was started by Slsc and ACT government.

once a month the kids from Canberra come over to the beach to learn surf skills .

it started because ....

84% of NSW SOUTH COAST drownings and rescues are people from Canberra! 

Thats a big stat !

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24 minutes ago, oldschool69#2 said:

Done here our surf club now runs a sister program with the nippers , it was started by Slsc and ACT government.

once a month the kids from Canberra come over to the beach to learn surf skills .

it started because ....

84% of NSW SOUTH COAST drownings and rescues are people from Canberra! 

Thats a big stat !

is it something to do with not being able to face going back?

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I put it down to Canberra people are usually academics and most people that are academic are dead set the clumsiest people I’ve seen and met 😂😂

you can pick em from a mile away 😂

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2 hours ago, oldschool69#2 said:

Done here our surf club now runs a sister program with the nippers , it was started by Slsc and ACT government.

I don't know if it still happens, but when I went to High School, a lot of the Sunshine & GC Surf Clubs ran programs with various Brisbane schools, where kids from those schools became members of the club. Our school teamed with Maroochydore. It was a brilliant idea.

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11 minutes ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

I don't know if it still happens, but when I went to High School, a lot of the Sunshine & GC Surf Clubs ran programs with various Brisbane schools, where kids from those schools became members of the club. Our school teamed with Maroochydore. It was a brilliant idea.

In Sydney Craig Riddington runs a company that's does surf skills with schools. More people should do it.

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4 hours ago, Cranky said:

 This is great. I wish I was so confident. I'm scared of swimming at the beach and will rarely go out where I can't touch..... unless I'm racing a triathlon, then I don't care at all and the swim is my favourite part!!

People should embrace the fact that you should not fight a rip. If you get in one, you should let it flow (with you in it) and then ease/swim out of it and swim back in. Note: easier said than done if you are not a strong swimmer and unsure of how rips work.

Diagram:

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=how+to+get+out+of+a+rip&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjtqK6ypdHfAhUCULwKHRpCD4sQ_AUIDigB&biw=1444&bih=983#imgrc=NjCUrgO0LrWOnM:&spf=1546507528644

 

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How many were swimming between the flags? 

Its why journalists are so shit.  

Simple research.  

Their story would give facts that most that drowned were in the wrong location by their own decision. 

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💯 Pete 

their is not many patrolled beaches down here so if they are not strong I just don’t get why they do it !

a few months ago my young fella was out diving and fishing at Bawley point and saw I guy getting baged up after he drowned and winched up to the chopper 

he was rock fishing in average size waves ! He was from Canberra the local paper said 

very sad for his family but gezzus !

i surf a lot but I know my limits 

so don’t put myself into danger 

pretty simple really 

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5 hours ago, Cranky said:

 This is great. I wish I was so confident. I'm scared of swimming at the beach and will rarely go out where I can't touch..... unless I'm racing a triathlon, then I don't care at all and the swim is my favourite part!!

I trained as a swimmer as a kid (11-14) and was pretty good. I was always happy and confident to swim at the beaches on the east coast of Ireland, south coast of Brittany and in the Med - no rips, no waves.

I came to Oz and was warned about the rips and currents and immediately felt them in the water when I was knee deep and I was pretty scared to really get in the water and battle the waves.  So I took a course - an ocean awareness course at Bondi beach. It was the best thing ever. I was taught how to spot a rip, how to use a rip, where a rip is likely to spit you out, how to duck dive waves, how to come in from the surf, how to body surf etc. 3 hours and it was worth it  Unfortunately I haven't practiced those skills in a few years, but I still know how to read a beach and am more confident...  

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This is my daughter age 10. There is no way I’d go out in that but my kids have all gone through Nippers and they know to only swim between the flags even though they are capable of handling rips and rough conditions. 

Why people with no surf skills swim outside flags or at unpatrolled beaches is beyond me. 

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17 minutes ago, Shuffla said:

Why people with no surf skills swim outside flags or at unpatrolled beaches is beyond me. 

Most people who haven’t grown up around the surf have no idea of the power in the water. 

They think they can just go out in the water waist deep. No idea of the channels where one minute the water is knee deep next second after a wave knocks them over they can’t stand anymore. It’s happened to most of us at some stage only difference is we can swim and don’t panic 

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On 12/01/2017 at 4:45 PM, trinube said:

e problem no doubt, would be 1) liability and 2) upsetting the swim schools who work out of the pools. Having said that, I have a couple of excellent contacts at the council so it might be worthwhile raising.

Liability is fine if it's a council centre. No biggy. Well if you have qualification and working with children check. 

The issue is there isn't many council run pools left. They're all contracted out and those companies running them would see it as a threat to their earnings. 

I tried to do this a while ago, I also got in trouble for coaching in my local pool a couple of weekends ago... So so stupid. I charge nothing and do it because I enjoy it. 

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28 minutes ago, Limited said:

They think they can just go out in the water waist deep. No idea of the channels where one minute the water is knee deep next second after a wave knocks them over they can’t stand anymore. It’s happened to most of us at some stage only difference is we can swim and don’t panic 

It’s interesting. My wife has taught swimming to a group of Indian migrants. They could not swim at all. The thing they found most difficult was going from a swimming position (horizontal) to standing up in chest high water. They just couldn’t get their feet down. And that was in a pool. 

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1 hour ago, Limited said:

Most people who haven’t grown up around the surf have no idea of the power in the water. 

They think they can just go out in the water waist deep. No idea of the channels where one minute the water is knee deep next second after a wave knocks them over they can’t stand anymore. It’s happened to most of us at some stage only difference is we can swim and don’t panic 

I can climb at those indoor climbing centres. Under controlled conditions as they are. Ie like between the flags. 

But I’m not going to go and climb outdoors without experts there to make sure everything (equipment conditions and level of difficulty) is safe. 

Yet people have been in a bath or backyard pool feel they can swim away from experts. 

Essentially the majority of people that have drowned, are idiots. And they would probably now agree. 

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