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Tubular tyres

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13 hours ago, Rimmer said:

 It was massively deformed and weird looking

That sounds like me too!

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1 hour ago, surfer101 said:

When did we stop calling them singles? And why??

it upset those who were not in a coupled relationship, tubulars is okay until the more rotund get offended :lol:

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2 hours ago, surfer101 said:

When did we stop calling them singles? And why??

I didn't know we had, until I read it here 

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6 hours ago, Niseko said:

Tubular are for roadies. No triathlete should ever use. 

Why do you say that?

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7 hours ago, Niseko said:

Tubular are for roadies. No triathlete should ever use. 

Get ya hand of it.

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I won't be using singles again.  The days of only using carbon wheels for racing only are long gone.  

Carbon clinchers are cheap enough to be used as training wheel & it's not worth the hassle of having to change out break pads etc. 

Anyone want to buy a set of Campagnolo Bora II with 4 brand new singles? 

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39 minutes ago, Bored@work said:

I won't be using singles again.  The days of only using carbon wheels for racing only are long gone.  

Carbon clinchers are cheap enough to be used as training wheel & it's not worth the hassle of having to change out break pads etc. 

Anyone want to buy a set of Campagnolo Bora II with 4 brand new singles? 

Totally agree but why get rid  of the tubs?

i havny riden anything but carbon rims for about 10 years ( I'm on the trainer now and even my trainer bike has carbon clinchers on it) 

carbon clincher for trainer and carbon tubs for racing , is the only way to go 

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4 hours ago, ironpo said:

Totally agree but why get rid  of the tubs?

i havny riden anything but carbon rims for about 10 years ( I'm on the trainer now and even my trainer bike has carbon clinchers on it) 

carbon clincher for trainer and carbon tubs for racing , is the only way to go 

I just don't use them.  They have been sitting around for a couple of years now.  I have a 808/1080 combo for the TT bike, that bike is stuffed,  I'll leave it on the kickr.  When I get a canyon TT I'll use the carbon wheels it comes with. 

Riding around overseas on training rides on singles is a pain in the butt & not worth the benefits of tubs.  I don't want to carry 2 sets of wheels when training.

I'll sell the Campy and zipps, then put that money towards a new TT bike. Disappointed the 2018 Canyon TT bikes don't have disc brakes.  

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7 hours ago, zed said:

Why do you say that?

They are slower than a good clincher with Latex. Difficult to change. Aero penalty for carrying spare on race day. Annoying to carry spare every day. Carbon rims don't brake well. 

 

That's enough reason. They used to be faster back in the day and like so much of triathlon we get fooled into doing whatever the single sport athletes do and roadies love their tubs so we blindly follow.

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4 hours ago, Niseko said:

They are slower than a good clincher with Latex. Difficult to change. Aero penalty for carrying spare on race day. Annoying to carry spare every day. Carbon rims don't brake well. 

 

 

That's all well and good but none of it is true these days 

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5 hours ago, Niseko said:

They are slower than a good clincher with Latex. Difficult to change. Aero penalty for carrying spare on race day. Annoying to carry spare every day. Carbon rims don't brake well. 

 

That's enough reason. They used to be faster back in the day and like so much of triathlon we get fooled into doing whatever the single sport athletes do and roadies love their tubs so we blindly follow.

I've given them a crack just because I've never used them before. My Planet X 90/60 training tubs seems to go pretty well on smooth roads with 150psi.  

I thought changing tubs was supposed to be easier? I watched old matey on a training ride change a tub in around a minute with a pre-glued spare and razor blade. 

 

Edited by zed

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1 hour ago, zed said:

 My Planet X 90/60 training tubs seems to go pretty well on smooth roads with 150psi.

150. I wouldn't run that in the best tubbies available at 100kgs. 135 is absolute max on the road. 

Try running them a but softer. Will probably be faster. 

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1 hour ago, willie said:

150. I wouldn't run that in the best tubbies available at 100kgs. 135 is absolute max on the road. 

Try running them a but softer. Will probably be faster. 

Ok cool thanks will do.

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Went to 25mm clinchers. Latex. Match them with the right tyre (prob a 23mm conti) and get good aero and rolling resistance.

 

30 years of tubbies or singles as they were. No more. 

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Arent they still called sewups??  #oldskool

My tubbies are now resigned to kitting out my "retro" softride. 

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4 minutes ago, Tyno said:

So, I should ask truck for a refund then :D

If I was still doing IM or serious long course Id use Tubbies as I find they are less prone to punctures or problems. 

As Im only doing short stuff these days Ill stick to clinchers, but have the tubbies as back ups in case I change my mind. 

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12 hours ago, zed said:

Ok cool thanks will do.

If you read all the stuff on RR etc 110 max is the recommendation 

sometimes down to 90 depends on your weight 

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2 hours ago, ironpo said:

If you read all the stuff on RR etc 110 max is the recommendation 

sometimes down to 90 depends on your weight 

The correct pressure does depend on the road surface too. In the velodrome they ride 180psi as rolling resistance is always lower with higher pressure,  just the bumping off at the road on rough surfaces costs time. So for German Hotmix might be a case to go 120, for IMNZ 90.

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5 hours ago, Tyno said:

So, I should ask truck for a refund then :D

Those wheels have been on the podium multiple times, qualified for and gone for a holiday to Kona twice and, apparently, before they left the shed expressed a desire to return to the lava fields! So there's a challenge for you :D  Seriously though, use double sided tape (you're not racing TdF descents) and they'll change quicker than any clincher.  You also don't run the risk of trying to fix a torn tyre in addition to a puncture.  If IP says it's the way to go then you need to believe :wink3:

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Can change one in 90 seconds. Try that with an HP set-up.

As for rolling resistance it's much of a muchness these days.

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