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Quick side question: if you have taped tubs, any trick&tips for changing during a long distance. Obviously carry a spare tub, but how do you carry the spare tape?

 

Ok, and another one: with my new disk, I can't get the pitstop onto the valve due to the cut out and the valve length - any ideas how to get around this?

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I don't think u can use the pit stop in Te disk

But there is a product called cafe latex which works better IMO and it has a rubber hose on the end that will get into the disk

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TP and IP,

 

I usually carry cafe latex with the tube for the disk

22021_main-01a.jpg?resizeid=2&resizeh=50

However, at Taupo this year I couldn't source any. So with one of the retailers in the expo, we tested using the Pitstop with the disk adapter.

It worked fine (without covering us and his shop in foam). No worries about clogging the disk adapter, as it gets blown clean by the CO2 canister to top up the tyre.

 

Fitwerx2.jpg and 41vqNjoo%2B-L._SY300_.jpg

 

Your welcome.

Foz

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Quick side question: if you have taped tubs, any trick&tips for changing during a long distance. Obviously carry a spare tub, but how do you carry the spare tape?

 

Ok, and another one: with my new disk, I can't get the pitstop onto the valve due to the cut out and the valve length - any ideas how to get around this?

I've only ever used double sided tape so my experience is that providing it hasn't been on forever, the tape will stay on the wheel when you take the tub off as long as you do it carefully. I also take a sharp blade so i can cut the tub if it's a tight fit. The replacement tub I've carried is always one that's been used for a bit to stretch it so it goes on easily and it also tends to have some stickiness to it. Never actually seen pitstop work in a race but I'm sure someone has had a positive experience....

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Thanks truck for the advice, good to know that the tape stays on. I've only just started using tubs, so don't have an old one, but bought a spare to carry.

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Thanks truck for the advice, good to know that the tape stays on. I've only just started using tubs, so don't have an old one, but bought a spare to carry.

 

Make sure the spare is well stretched otherwise it will be a real pain on race day if you need it.

 

Ideally stretch it over a rim and then inflate it and leave it for a few days if you can

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Make sure the spare is well stretched otherwise it will be a real pain on race day if you need it.

 

Ideally stretch it over a rim and then inflate it and leave it for a few days if you can

 

Cheers Roxii, can I do this over a clincher wheel?

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Cheers Roxii, can I do this over a clincher wheel?

If your spare is a good quality brand new tubby. Carefully peel off the existing tubby on the back wheel for the spare and put the new one on for the next race.

The spare is now already glued and stretched.

 

 

Never actually seen pitstop work in a race but I'm sure someone has had a positive experience....

First race day flat at Taupo 2014. (95km) rear tyre. Spin the wheel to check for the cause, a staple pierced the tyre. Pulled it out. No need to remove the wheel. Put half a can of cafe espresso (the one with the tube) in. Spin the wheel to spread the foam. CO2 cannister into the tyre. Repack my stuff and back into the race. No way could I remove the rear wheel and change a clincher tube that quick. Got another flat same race at 170km. Same quick process with the last half of the can. But I was also mentally prepping myself for a 10km run with the bike into T2 if it failed. Got to T2 fine. That was with Vittoria Corsa Pros.

 

I had a rear tyre explode/sliced open about 1km from the top of the Noosa Tri descent in 2015. That required a full tubbie replacement. That took about the same time as it would take me to replace a clincher tube. But doing 70Kph+ descent on a freshly placed spare tyre was a sphincter puckering factor of ten the power of infinity. I do not recommend it. :sweatdrop:

 

I now use Continental 4000s tubbies. No flats since. They feel much more resistant to punctures.

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I've seen some tests that sealants work better on latex than butyl. Kinda counter intuitive as one is weaker than the other. Just saying.

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I am a fan of the Continental Competitions as well and currently looking to replace a few ones and i have found a good price variation between sites. Pushys $125, Bike Bug $105 and Wiggle $88. Would they all be the same tubulars or different?

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I am a fan of the Continental Competitions as well and currently looking to replace a few ones and i have found a good price variation between sites. Pushys $125, Bike Bug $105 and Wiggle $88. Would they all be the same tubulars or different?

All the same tyre mate.

They only make one Conti Competition tubular, in 19, 22 or 25mm

Edited by Derny Driver

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*BUMP*

As the proud new owner of a set of tubbies, what else do I need to know?

I'll have to get new pads and learn more about valve extenders, as well as all this glue & tape business.

Anything I'm missing?

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1 hour ago, Tyno said:

*BUMP*

As the proud new owner of a set of tubbies, what else do I need to know?

I'll have to get new pads and learn more about valve extenders, as well as all this glue & tape business.

Anything I'm missing?

You have to pre stretch the tyre 

welcome to arwsomness 

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Tips???

1. Welcome to Greatness.

2. Forget the tape - glue all the way.

3. Plumbers tape around the valve to make it seal.

4. Leave a section of about 4-5" opposite the valve free to extract the single from the rim. Make sure there is an even amount of backing tape showing around each side of the rim (i.e. balance the single on the rim).

5. Pump to manufacturer's recommendations ... not under and not over.

6. Find an old guy at your local cycling club who knows how to repair them. A tenner is the usual going rate.

7. If you have replaced one and need to limp home, watch the cornering so you don't roll them off!

8. Go quick.

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The majority of the research shows the best aero and crr results for riders below 90kg*

 

 

*probably not true but may motivate you... 😂

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10 hours ago, Ex-Hasbeen said:

 

And if you want to sound old, call them singles. :)

Now I feel old 

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Watch the Zipp video's on glueing and never trust anyone else to glue your singles on

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There was also a Continental video going around where they inflated a single to >500psi! It was massively deformed and weird looking, but they are pretty robust!

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