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Any benefit from strength work/lifting

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Just wondering if anyone has actually gained any benefits from doing any form of strength work, ie. speed, injury prevention etc. I'm currently doing 2 sessions per week (full body), but am not sure if I will gain any triathlon benefits?

cheers

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The older you get the more benefit you will get from doing it earlier on.

 

In regards to triathlon if the exercises are specific to the sport than they will be of benefit.

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Doing multi sports omits so many muscle groups. The core muscles. Upper arms. The abdominals.

 

Cycling wont touch most of those. Nor will running.

 

I think it will help you. But take some advice from FB Fitness Buddy above. He;s a trainer and he or someone with specific knowledge could advise you more.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries. It could actually create more injuries if not done perfectly.

If you are on a serious weight lifting programme, it is likely to deliver you to your next swim, ride or run session with some kind of tiredness which will have a negative impact on that session.

 

In my experience, the correct mobility and core work helps with relaxation and posture. Makes you feel good. So if you have time and know what you're doing, do it. If you don't have time best to stick with swimming, riding and running.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries. It could actually create more injuries if not done perfectly.

If you are on a serious weight lifting programme, it is likely to deliver you to your next swim, ride or run session with some kind of tiredness which will have a negative impact on that session.

 

In my experience, the correct mobility and core work helps with relaxation and posture. Makes you feel good. So if you have time and know what you're doing, do it. If you don't have time best to stick with swimming, riding and running.

This

Plus it takes time away from swim ride running

 

I do two sessions of core work a week , and belive this helps me in all facets of life

Not just tricathalon

Cheers

Ivp

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I do 2 shorter sets of weights a week (they take about 20 mins if I hustle). I work with a PT who is also a triathlete and has the guidance of a level 2 performance coach.

 

Shoulders/arms - building strength in general, plus specific swim movement weights - cuban presses

Legs - strength and stabilisation - squats mostly

Back/Core - strength and stabilisation - ball work, deadlifts

 

I tend to finish those sessions off with a quick stint on the treadmill, speed interval work, usually set to 1% gradient at a minimum, so I still get my run time in, just less of it.

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You will feel more awesome.

 

I think the benefits are more long term health based than tri performance. Lots of imbalances from swimming and single plane leg wrok in tri running and riding too.

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I would say that it won't make you faster. It probably won't make you swim, ride or run better - only swimming, riding and running will do that.

Won't help prevent any injuries either as it's not likely to stop any impact injuries or overuse injuries.

Isn't core work strength work to some degree? If yes than how can it not help in injury prevention. Core exercises improve both balance and stability therefore assisting other muscle groups to hold form etc.

 

I've been using TRX 2-3 times a week for around 3 months and I tend to agree with others that I wouldn't drop a tri specific session for one but if time allows its an added advantage to have/use.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've always done core strength work.

 

Recently got this book out from our library "Triathlon Anatomy" by Mark Klion and Troy Jacobson.

 

What I really like about it - is that it illustrates what core exercises benefit what muscles for triathlon eg. Stability Ball Prayer Roll -- ..."help the triathlete outstretched on a tri bike in the aero position ride longer with greater comfort" -- loads of pictures highlighting the actual muscles used

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Strength training can easily done at home with just a few pieces of equipment.

Resistance Bands

Fit Ball/Stability Ball

Balance disc

Powerband.

 

Doing unilateral exercises is going to give you best bang for buck for sports performance.

 

Running- single leg calf raises in toe off position. This can be achieved by placing hands on wall so body is leaning forward opposite leg is in knee drive. Now contract glute and perform calf raise. The benefit is engaging the same muscles through the toe off. Build to 50 each leg

Single leg leg curl on stability ball - hamstring glute used adding stabilisation through pelvis. Start hands on floor progress to no hands.

Single leg quarter squat - one legged squat performed as a quarter movement with rear leg trailing behind. If you lack dorsi flexion place a thin book under heel. Start point hold a chair on the same leg using with one hand. Progressing is hands free.

Can post some bike and swim ones if interested.

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The older you get the more benefit you will get from doing it earlier on.

In regards to triathlon if the exercises are specific to the sport than they will be of benefit.

Agree with this.

Like it or not, the older you get, the more you should be doing some form of strength training.

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Agree with this.

Like it or not, the older you get, the more you should be doing some form of strength training.

Yes, if you lead a sedentary life. If you are spending a lot of your time in the pursuit of becoming a better triathlete, simply incorporate strength methods into your swimming, riding and running ie. Pull/paddles, big gears, hills.

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I think the benefits are more long term health based than tri performance. Lots of imbalances from swimming and single plane leg wrok in tri running and riding too.

 

I agree with this - I think it's more beneficial for long term general health rather than athletic performance. There seems to be a lot of effort put into having older folk doing weights to maintain bone strength as they age.

 

Weights has never been something I enjoyed so I don't do them - I'm more into core, stretch, yoga type strength. Having said that, I see no great harm in weights if that's what you want to do - as long as it's done properly. I'm not sure super heavy weights are a great thing except for the Bondi shirtless crew.

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No TC, no caveats like sedentary lifestyle etc, all types of lifestyle can benefit from strength training as a person gets older, especially past 40 years of age. Notice I said "strength training" and not weight training, which I think you fixate on as the interpretation of strength training.

Using paddles for strength training in swimming, big gear workouts on the bike or hill repeats for cycling and running all fit the bill as strength training. But as FB and AP have separately pointed out, you need some form of strength training as you get older.

The secret is for the individual to work out if they need to do some form of strength training. For example. A guy doing a manual labour job on the tools will have functional strength in his back and upper body so won't necessarily have to focus on that. But his core and legs may need some work. Alternatively, someone who works in an office will need to focus on more areas starting with their core.

The best thing for anyone who is not sure how to go about undertaking a strength program to compliment their triathlon training as they get older, is to ask their coach or a PT.

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Im working with a PT a couple of times a week at the moment and hes big into the trx stuff. I'm really noticing how functionally weak i seem to be considering i had hought i was keeping ok. Really brings your core into it

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No TC, no caveats like sedentary lifestyle etc, all types of lifestyle can benefit from strength training as a person gets older, especially past 40 years of age. Notice I said "strength training" and not weight training, which I think you fixate on as the interpretation of strength training.

Using paddles for strength training in swimming, big gear workouts on the bike or hill repeats for cycling and running all fit the bill as strength training. But as FB and AP have separately pointed out, you need some form of strength training as you get older.

The secret is for the individual to work out if they need to do some form of strength training. For example. A guy doing a manual labour job on the tools will have functional strength in his back and upper body so won't necessarily have to focus on that. But his core and legs may need some work. Alternatively, someone who works in an office will need to focus on more areas starting with their core.

The best thing for anyone who is not sure how to go about undertaking a strength program to compliment their triathlon training as they get older, is to ask their coach or a PT.

is your core activated while sbr?

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Yes, if you lead a sedentary life. If you are spending a lot of your time in the pursuit of becoming a better triathlete, simply incorporate strength methods into your swimming, riding and running ie. Pull/paddles, big gears, hills.

This sounds great in reality but unless you are perfectly balanced athlete even the pros are not then overloading the body through these methods can be costly. Yes sport specific strength is critical but you need to be able to apply it correctly. If you are overcompensating due to imbalance performing paddles,big gear or hill running you will generally end up injured.

 

As we are always interested in what the pros do I am pretty sure most of them do resistance training and conditioning to help them perform better.

The ones i am aware of are

Dave Scott -

Mark Allen

Mirinda Carfrae

Mel Hauschildt

Tim O'Donnell

Craig Alexander

Tim Van Berkel

Jan Frodeno

These are the ones I know.

 

Their workouts are tailored to their individual weaknesses.

 

So first you must identify the weaknesses and then apply exercises which are aimed at in order

1. Achieving activation

2. Applying stability

3. Applying strength/load

4. Applying dynamic movement

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Thanks FB - always thoughtful in your response. Just to point out, they are full time Pro's and can rest and train off any cycle they want (not a typical 7 day age grouper cycle), therefore, the risk of going into a SBR carrying fatigue from a gym session can be manages.

 

GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

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As running is done one leg at time, with core activated as the platform for rotation, is this not a fine way to build specific strength/endurance in those muscles with specific activation.

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GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

Finding a good PT is bullshit hard anyway. This is why I've always believed that someone who has gone to University and graduated with a degree such as human movement or exercise science is always going to be better than a PT who has done a 12 week course online. I know that this is going to cop some backlash from people on here but at the end of the day I would throw my money at someone that has spent 3+ years studying the ins and outs of the human body in relation to movement.

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Thanks FB - always thoughtful in your response. Just to point out, they are full time Pro's and can rest and train off any cycle they want (not a typical 7 day age grouper cycle), therefore, the risk of going into a SBR carrying fatigue from a gym session can be manages.

 

GM, a PT who can make you a better swim/bike/runner will be hard to find. Cheers

Thats where periodisation comes into play.

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Finding a good PT is bullshit hard anyway. This is why I've always believed that someone who has gone to University and graduated with a degree such as human movement or exercise science is always going to be better than a PT who has done a 12 week course online. I know that this is going to cop some backlash from people on here but at the end of the day I would throw my money at someone that has spent 3+ years studying the ins and outs of the human body in relation to movement.

 

Alex what a load shit. I know many university graduates in various professions who may have a piece a paper to say they know this and that but put into practice they are shit. Knowing anatomy from theory is fine but seeing, observing and understanding dysfunction and movement patterns is more relevant.

As I have said before I hate the PT industry as so many give it a bad name.

Can remember talking about going to physio for run analysis etc and achieving no results. They are uni educated but still failed for a few.

 

Not trying to blow my own trumpet but i dont have a uni degree and did online fitness course but also an intetnship for a sports development diploma which was all practical and yet I knew more than the head exercise scientists in some areas particularly running related.

I have learnt a lot more away from books and school etc by actually going through the process myself and understanding things from the physical aspect. Have used myself as a guinea pig numerous times.

 

In some instances a Uni degree is just a piece of paper saying you know something. The real experts who live, dream and passionate about what they do not just treat people as a money making scheme.

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Alex what a load shit. I know many university graduates in various professions who may have a piece a paper to say they know this and that but put into practice they are shit. Knowing anatomy from theory is fine but seeing, observing and understanding dysfunction and movement patterns is more relevant.

As I have said before I hate the PT industry as so many give it a bad name.

Can remember talking about going to physio for run analysis etc and achieving no results. They are uni educated but still failed for a few.

 

Not trying to blow my own trumpet but i dont have a uni degree and did online fitness course but also an intetnship for a sports development diploma which was all practical and yet I knew more than the head exercise scientists in some areas particularly running related.

I have learnt a lot more away from books and school etc by actually going through the process myself and understanding things from the physical aspect. Have used myself as a guinea pig numerous times.

 

In some instances a Uni degree is just a piece of paper saying you know something. The real experts who live, dream and passionate about what they do not just treat people as a money making scheme.

FB you seem like a well intentioned guy, you are blowing your own trumpet and this thread is coming across as megaphone, talking down to people as if no one else knows anything. Periodisation is not a surprise to us.

 

You might know this and not care, just like I come across as a smart alec.

 

Weight training is not shown to be of great value for endurance athletes, people keep trying to make it so to justify their position.

 

Some well credentialed athletes have done it and won, they all take supplements too which are not proven to meet their claims

Edited by BarryBevan
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FB you seem like a well intentioned guy, you are blowing your own trumpet and this thread is coming across as megaphone, talking down to people as if no one else knows anything. Periodisation is not a surprise to us.

Â

You might know this and not care, just like I come across as a smart alec.

Â

Weight training is not shown to be of great value for endurance athletes, people keep trying to make it so to justify their position.

Â

Some well credentialed athletes have done it and won, they all take supplements too which are not proven to meet their claims

 

I just hate it when people say you need a uni degree to justify what you know. Many people have Uni degrees and have not used them as there is no work or they lose interest in the career choice.

 

A builder who doesnt pay extra money to be a master builder or join a union is no less a builder than one who is.

Same goes for people in fitness industry you either take pride in what you do or you don't.

 

People should not be judged on a Uni degree.

 

By the way did i say anything about weight training don't think so.

Maybe conditioning, prehab, rehab if needed. How does one return from a stress fracture without any form of rehab and conditioning as an example.

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Im working with a PT a couple of times a week at the moment and hes big into the trx stuff. I'm really noticing how functionally weak i seem to be considering i had hought i was keeping ok. Really brings your core into it

Love trx. Need to get a set.

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I just hate it when people say you need a uni degree to justify what you know. Many people have Uni degrees and have not used them as there is no work or they lose interest in the career choice.

 

A builder who doesnt pay extra money to be a master builder or join a union is no less a builder than one who is.

Same goes for people in fitness industry you either take pride in what you do or you don't.

 

People should not be judged on a Uni degree.

 

By the way did i say anything about weight training don't think so.

Maybe conditioning, prehab, rehab if needed. How does one return from a stress fracture without any form of rehab and conditioning as an example.

I agree with you, there are people with no quals who are brilliant. Doing the study can be useful, not sure I would go to a doctor without a degree, though I am sure there are healers who do good work without degrees.

 

People should not be judged on a uni degree, can we respect that they have a body of knowledge and have demonstrated that to a defined objective standard.

 

Weight training resistance training, bands, not sure you need it for tris. Specificity is a great principle. The customer makes a a valid suggestion.

 

As far as goes rehab, don't know, was that the line of questioning from the OP? I assume they are good for that.

 

Most of the people who chase the silver bullet in my experience tend not to be doing the basics, example:

 

1. I need to work on my run form as it is my limiter, while only running 25 K a week;

 

2. I need to do plyometrics to run faster in my IM marathon, but I only run 25 K a week;

 

3. I need to do injury prevention work, core, on leg calf raises, but when I run I only do High intensity intervals and when I do run more than 25 k in my 4 week IM build I do one more run of 35 K.

 

I am no genius in anything and just do what I am told by some good people. I spent 4 years or so trying to prove to myself that I needed to run more (probably because I like it), when what I needed to do was rid and swim more and then execute well.

Edited by BarryBevan

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I agree with you, there are people with no quals who are brilliant. Doing the study can be useful, not sure I would go to a doctor without a degree, though I am sure there are healers who do good work without degrees.

Â

People should not be judged on a uni degree, can we respect that they have a body of knowledge and have demonstrated that to a defined objective standard.

Â

Weight training resistance training, bands, not sure you need it for tris. Specificity is a great principle. The customer makes a a valid suggestion.

Â

As far as goes rehab, don't know, was that the line of questioning from the OP? I assume they are good for that.

Â

Most of the people who chase the silver bullet in my experience tend not to be doing the basics, example:

Â

1. Â I need to work on my run form as it is my limiter, while only running 25 K a week;

Â

2. Â I need to do plyometrics to run faster in my IM marathon, but I only run 25 K a week;

Â

3. Â I need to do injury prevention work, core, on leg calf raises, but when I run I only do High intensity intervals and when I do run more than 25 k in my 4 week IM build I do one more run of 35 K.

Â

I am no genius in anything and just do what I am told by some good people. I spent 4 years or so trying to prove to myself that I needed to run more (probably because I like it), when what I needed to do was rid and swim more and then execute well.

 

So if a doctor kills/misdiagnose or surgeon screws up an operation on a patient but has all the uni qualifications does that means it is okay because he is Uni graduate?

 

Uni is relevant for certain things but the world has turned into bogus qualifications which really are just revenue raising. E.g. certificate III in retail.

 

PT Qualifications are way to easy to get IMO but that doesn't mean you don't stop learning new skills and research, practice and analyse to ensure you are providing the best outcome for your career and for your clients.

 

Hell man i provide PT sesdions for free for disadvantage people (elderly/disabled). I do it to help them be able to maintain strength to perform daily activities and more importantly balance. Plus it is rewarding seeing them progress and smile.

 

You can take the piss as much as want.

 

I love what I do and happily do it for free which i do quite often. Free programs for new gym members (not generic/personalised). Sometimes it seems it goes unrewarded but when you get feedback from the gym owner etc. Some people dont have the money to afford PT but II would rather see them have something to follow and some badic guidelines so they progress.

BB you may not see the benefit but some do.

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I agree with you, there are people with no quals who are brilliant. Doing the study can be useful, not sure I would go to a doctor without a degree, though I am sure there are healers who do good work without degrees.

Â

People should not be judged on a uni degree, can we respect that they have a body of knowledge and have demonstrated that to a defined objective standard.

Â

Weight training resistance training, bands, not sure you need it for tris. Specificity is a great principle. The customer makes a a valid suggestion.

Â

As far as goes rehab, don't know, was that the line of questioning from the OP? I assume they are good for that.

Â

Most of the people who chase the silver bullet in my experience tend not to be doing the basics, example:

Â

1. Â I need to work on my run form as it is my limiter, while only running 25 K a week;

Â

2. Â I need to do plyometrics to run faster in my IM marathon, but I only run 25 K a week;

Â

3. Â I need to do injury prevention work, core, on leg calf raises, but when I run I only do High intensity intervals and when I do run more than 25 k in my 4 week IM build I do one more run of 35 K.

Â

I am no genius in anything and just do what I am told by some good people. I spent 4 years or so trying to prove to myself that I needed to run more (probably because I like it), when what I needed to do was rid and swim more and then execute well.

 

So if a doctor kills/misdiagnose or surgeon screws up an operation on a patient but has all the uni qualifications does that means it is okay because he is Uni graduate?

 

Uni is relevant for certain things but the world has turned into bogus qualifications which really are just revenue raising. E.g. certificate III in retail.

 

PT Qualifications are way to easy to get IMO but that doesn't mean you don't stop learning new skills and research, practice and analyse to ensure you are providing the best outcome for your career and for your clients.

 

Hell man i provide PT sesdions for free for disadvantage people (elderly/disabled). I do it to help them be able to maintain strength to perform daily activities and more importantly balance. Plus it is rewarding seeing them progress and smile.

 

You can take the piss as much as want.

 

I love what I do and happily do it for free which i do quite often. Free programs for new gym members (not generic/personalised). Sometimes it seems it goes unrewarded but when you get feedback from the gym owner etc. Some people dont have the money to afford PT but II would rather see them have something to follow and some badic guidelines so they progress.

BB you may not see the benefit but some do.

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I agree with you, there are people with no quals who are brilliant. Doing the study can be useful, not sure I would go to a doctor without a degree, though I am sure there are healers who do good work without degrees.

Â

People should not be judged on a uni degree, can we respect that they have a body of knowledge and have demonstrated that to a defined objective standard.

Â

Weight training resistance training, bands, not sure you need it for tris. Specificity is a great principle. The customer makes a a valid suggestion.

Â

As far as goes rehab, don't know, was that the line of questioning from the OP? I assume they are good for that.

Â

Most of the people who chase the silver bullet in my experience tend not to be doing the basics, example:

Â

1. Â I need to work on my run form as it is my limiter, while only running 25 K a week;

Â

2. Â I need to do plyometrics to run faster in my IM marathon, but I only run 25 K a week;

Â

3. Â I need to do injury prevention work, core, on leg calf raises, but when I run I only do High intensity intervals and when I do run more than 25 k in my 4 week IM build I do one more run of 35 K.

Â

I am no genius in anything and just do what I am told by some good people. I spent 4 years or so trying to prove to myself that I needed to run more (probably because I like it), when what I needed to do was rid and swim more and then execute well.

 

So if a doctor kills/misdiagnose or surgeon screws up an operation on a patient but has all the uni qualifications does that means it is okay because he is Uni graduate?

 

Uni is relevant for certain things but the world has turned into bogus qualifications which really are just revenue raising. E.g. certificate III in retail.

 

PT Qualifications are way to easy to get IMO but that doesn't mean you don't stop learning new skills and research, practice and analyse to ensure you are providing the best outcome for your career and for your clients.

 

Hell man i provide PT sesdions for free for disadvantage people (elderly/disabled). I do it to help them be able to maintain strength to perform daily activities and more importantly balance. Plus it is rewarding seeing them progress and smile.

 

You can take the piss as much as want.

 

I love what I do and happily do it for free which i do quite often. Free programs for new gym members (not generic/personalised). Sometimes it seems it goes unrewarded but when you get feedback from the gym owner etc. Some people dont have the money to afford PT but II would rather see them have something to follow and some badic guidelines so they progress.

BB you may not see the benefit but some do.

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I agree with you, there are people with no quals who are brilliant. Doing the study can be useful, not sure I would go to a doctor without a degree, though I am sure there are healers who do good work without degrees.

Â

People should not be judged on a uni degree, can we respect that they have a body of knowledge and have demonstrated that to a defined objective standard.

Â

Weight training resistance training, bands, not sure you need it for tris. Specificity is a great principle. The customer makes a a valid suggestion.

Â

As far as goes rehab, don't know, was that the line of questioning from the OP? I assume they are good for that.

Â

Most of the people who chase the silver bullet in my experience tend not to be doing the basics, example:

Â

1. Â I need to work on my run form as it is my limiter, while only running 25 K a week;

Â

2. Â I need to do plyometrics to run faster in my IM marathon, but I only run 25 K a week;

Â

3. Â I need to do injury prevention work, core, on leg calf raises, but when I run I only do High intensity intervals and when I do run more than 25 k in my 4 week IM build I do one more run of 35 K.

Â

I am no genius in anything and just do what I am told by some good people. I spent 4 years or so trying to prove to myself that I needed to run more (probably because I like it), when what I needed to do was rid and swim more and then execute well.

 

So if a doctor kills/misdiagnose or surgeon screws up an operation on a patient but has all the uni qualifications does that means it is okay because he is Uni graduate?

 

Uni is relevant for certain things but the world has turned into bogus qualifications which really are just revenue raising. E.g. certificate III in retail.

 

PT Qualifications are way to easy to get IMO but that doesn't mean you don't stop learning new skills and research, practice and analyse to ensure you are providing the best outcome for your career and for your clients.

 

Hell man i provide PT sesdions for free for disadvantage people (elderly/disabled). I do it to help them be able to maintain strength to perform daily activities and more importantly balance. Plus it is rewarding seeing them progress and smile.

 

You can take the piss as much as want.

 

I love what I do and happily do it for free which i do quite often. Free programs for new gym members (not generic/personalised). Sometimes it seems it goes unrewarded but when you get feedback from the gym owner etc. Some people dont have the money to afford PT but II would rather see them have something to follow and some badic guidelines so they progress.

BB you may not see the benefit but some do.

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OK, here's a question from a guy that has to do some core work most days, just to function.

 

A while ago, I read a post from Parkside that said words to the effect of 'anyone suggesting 'firing glutes' was full of it ( I think he was referring to physios) but I never understood why.*

 

Also is the term 'contracting' and 'firing' the same thing?

 

* with apologies to Parky if I misread.

Edited by FatPom

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So if a doctor kills/misdiagnose or surgeon screws up an operation on a patient but has all the uni qualifications does that means it is okay because he is Uni graduate?

 

Uni is relevant for certain things but the world has turned into bogus qualifications which really are just revenue raising. E.g. certificate III in retail.

 

PT Qualifications are way to easy to get IMO but that doesn't mean you don't stop learning new skills and research, practice and analyse to ensure you are providing the best outcome for your career and for your clients.

 

Hell man i provide PT sesdions for free for disadvantage people (elderly/disabled). I do it to help them be able to maintain strength to perform daily activities and more importantly balance. Plus it is rewarding seeing them progress and smile.

 

You can take the piss as much as want.

 

I love what I do and happily do it for free which i do quite often. Free programs for new gym members (not generic/personalised). Sometimes it seems it goes unrewarded but when you get feedback from the gym owner etc. Some people dont have the money to afford PT but II would rather see them have something to follow and some badic guidelines so they progress.

BB you may not see the benefit but some do.

I'm not trying to take the piss, trying to find some middle ground. I agree with a lot of what you are saying, I am a pretty good systems engineer but don't have an eng degree so can't actually be one.

 

If you step back from thinking it is a personal attack maybe there is some common ground. I think you have a lot of good things to say. Maybe some of that gets lost ( I know how that feels) in the messaging.

 

When you begin posts from a position of self appointed authority, and then critique those who have taken a different path you are opening yourself up a little, you call it taking the piss.

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When I ask about the one legged calf raise and its benefits over running which has around 60 to 80 one legged calf raises per minute I am interested in knowing why it is not just as easy to do them by running.

 

accepting that there is going to be something in the isolation versus the dynamic movement of running. Running is specific while the calf raise is not so why not run.

 

If you know you collapse through one side , why not focus mentally on not collapsing or run with the treadmill and mirror

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I'm not trying to take the piss, trying to find some middle ground. I agree with a lot of what you are saying, I am a pretty good systems engineer but don't have an eng degree so can't actually be one.

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If you step back from thinking it is a personal attack maybe there is some common ground. I think you have a lot of good things to say. Maybe some of that gets lost ( I know how that feels) in the messaging.

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When you begin posts from a position of self appointed authority, and then critique those who have taken a different path you are opening yourself up a little, you call it taking the piss.

I didnt start the post and all i did was offer some advice and assistance.

Then along comes a member who thinks PT are useless because they are not uni graduates. That's where it got me off side.

I only used myself as an example of where knowledge doesnt necessarily need to come from 4 years studying for the opportunity to get a uni degree which doesn't actually give you a job (so many uni graduates and no job).

 

One of my biggest weaknesses is I over react. I am very passionate person who probably over reacts to slander and non constructive criticism. This pretty much eventuated when I was umpiring and from my father who criticised everything I did.

 

I am sorry if i over reacted.

 

Transitions is very weird place you have people who are trolls, some very nice, some seeking help and others after a laugh. Maybe that's why we kerp checking in on here.

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I didnt start the post and all i did was offer some advice and assistance.

Then along comes a member who thinks PT are useless because they are not uni graduates. That's where it got me off side.

I only used myself as an example of where knowledge doesnt necessarily need to come from 4 years studying for the opportunity to get a uni degree which doesn't actually give you a job (so many uni graduates and no job).

 

One of my biggest weaknesses is I over react. I am very passionate person who probably over reacts to slander and non constructive criticism. This pretty much eventuated when I was umpiring and from my father who criticised everything I did.

 

I am sorry if i over reacted.

 

Transitions is very weird place you have people who are trolls, some very nice, some seeking help and others after a laugh. Maybe that's why we kerp checking in on here.

you're alright don't worry nothing to apoligise for. My old man never liked much of what I did either and it is hard to believe in yourself when those closest to you tear you down as a first reaction.

 

You post a lot of good stuff, there are lots of uni grads, some good some not so good. Far too many grads think that degree buys them some sort of immunity and right to assert more knowledge than others, especially those with real life experience

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I love how you go to a chiro, physio or PT with a niggle and they lead you believe that all the imbalances in your body need months of appointments to 'correct' if you're ever gonna make it past 50. I have news for you - no one is symetrical. All the adjustments in the world won't change the structure you're born with. I think most of our niggles, as amateur athletes, are triggered by lifestyle choices. How we expect to spring to our feet and pump out 10 or 15km running sets after sitting hunched over a keyboard all day is beyond me. Add a high sugar diet of convenience foods, inadequate sleep and improper relaxation just compounds issues.

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When I ask about the one legged calf raise and its benefits over running which has around 60 to 80 one legged calf raises per minute I am interested in knowing why it is not just as easy to do them by running.

Â

accepting that there is going to be something in the isolation versus the dynamic movement of running. Running is specific while the calf raise is not so why not run.

Â

If you know you collapse through one side , why not focus mentally on not collapsing or run with the treadmill and mirror

Have you corrected glute medius weakeness (collapse) through running on a treadmill?

 

In relation to calf raise. My example of the exercise is to involve the push off/toe off phase of running.

 

There are many runners who heavily rely on calf muscles to propel with very little glute max involvement - these are generally those who have very little knee drive and flight in their run gait ala short stride.

Running will generally not correct this without re wiring the communication between the brain and the muscles.

 

When we are babies we perform exercises unknowlingly to be able to progress to the next step.

E.g. Tummy time - baby on belly to teach muscles to engage through back etc.

Sitting up right on bottom - core control

Crawling - Multiplanar exercise to develop co ordination and strength through core, shoulders and hips

 

These are examples and apply again if you have ever had to reeducate walking patterns again.

 

Unless you have been unforunate to be badly injured and had bad illness/infection you may not understand.

 

Note: I am trying to help.

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Have you corrected glute medius weakeness (collapse) through running on a treadmill?

 

In relation to calf raise. My example of the exercise is to involve the push off/toe off phase of running.

 

There are many runners who heavily rely on calf muscles to propel with very little glute max involvement - these are generally those who have very little knee drive and flight in their run gait ala short stride.

Running will generally not correct this without re wiring the communication between the brain and the muscles.

 

When we are babies we perform exercises unknowlingly to be able to progress to the next step.

E.g. Tummy time - baby on belly to teach muscles to engage through back etc.

Sitting up right on bottom - core control

Crawling - Multiplanar exercise to develop co ordination and strength through core, shoulders and hips

 

These are examples and apply again if you have ever had to reeducate walking patterns again.

 

Unless you have been unforunate to be badly injured and had bad illness/infection you may not understand.

 

Note: I am trying to help.

I get that and I am trying to have a conversation (forums not so good for that) rather than argument (excellent for that).

 

I like simplicity, noting that there are lots of things that are not, how about doing 8 or so 30 to 1 min intervals up a 5 to 6% slope and jog down after a warm up.

 

Strides?

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I love how you go to a chiro, physio or PT with a niggle and they lead you believe that all the imbalances in your body need months of appointments to 'correct' if you're ever gonna make it past 50.

It mustn't be just you guys I annoy then! My Physio can't wait to get rid of me when I go see him!

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TC, not hard at all to find a PT to help with your strength training to enhance your SBR. As an example, There's 3 very good PT who are members of WSTC who are delivering excellent results.

Whether you accept or dismiss the PT industry, it doesn't remove the fact that as you get older, you need to do some form of strength training As part of your training for triathlon. Which I believe was a he original question.

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I get that and I am trying to have a conversation (forums not so good for that) rather than argument (excellent for that).

Â

I like simplicity, noting that there are lots of things that are not, how about doing 8 or so 30 to 1 min intervals up a  5 to 6% slope and jog down after a warm up.

Â

Strides?

IMO everyone is different and responds different to different stimulus.

Running up hill is a great tool in creating knee drive/foot landing, increased glute activity but for some in doesn't get translated back to level ground.

Also it really depends on the experience of the athlete, their background, injury history etc. Exercise prescription needs to involve all these.

 

Simple isolated exercises can be used as prehab/warm up or a retraining tool but each exercise must have a progression to it to get to the end goal. .

1. Isolated calf/glute exercise

2. Hopping one leg on spot

3. Hopping on one leg forwards

4. Running

This is from scratch obviously but you progress from one stage to the next when you become efficient.

 

Depending at where you are at to what you apply. Some great athletes may be poor at simple things but does this mean they should just ignore it? Maybe - if happy where at

Maybe not - if have niggles, lacking performance, seeking improvement.

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In most instances, schooling is about passing on accumulated decades of knowledge so graduates can build on that in a shorter overall timeframe. Without having to reinvent the wheel themselves.

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TC, not hard at all to find a PT to help with your strength training to enhance your SBR. As an example, There's 3 very good PT who are members of WSTC who are delivering excellent results.

Whether you accept or dismiss the PT industry, it doesn't remove the fact that as you get older, you need to do some form of strength training As part of your training for triathlon. Which I believe was a he original question.

GM, I repeat, the only thing that will enhance your SBR is SBR.

 

Most gym work requires some form of 'pulling' action which contradicts the 'pushing' action required in swimming in particular.

 

Again, if you want to waste your time rolling around on a swiss ball or swinging a kettle between your legs, be my guest.

 

You haven't posted a photo of yourself on AP diet thread yet.

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GM, I repeat, the only thing that will enhance your SBR is SBR.

 

Most gym work requires some form of 'pulling' action which contradicts the 'pushing' action required in swimming in particular.

 

Again, if you want to waste your time rolling around on a swiss ball or swinging a kettle between your legs, be my guest.

 

You haven't posted a photo of yourself on AP diet thread yet.

 

Kettlebells and rolling around on swiss balls maybe i need to start including this in my programming. ð

 

What are you actually pushing when you swim except when push off the wall on a turn?

Catch and pull pretty sure they are fundamentals of swimming. You PULL your hand through the water to create forward pulposion. Like to see you PUSH it and see where you end up

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Do swimmers, runners and cyclists racing these disciplines separately use S&C programs?

 

Honest question, I have no idea but assume swimmers do given their physiques.

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Famous quote from Sutto "Kieran Perkins was so weak he couldn't carry his own swim bag".

Now he didn't look weak, but the point being swimming is not really a strength sport.

 

And Sutto would have his athletes do hill reps in bike and run rather than weights

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