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If I did half of the K's those guys do it would probably kill me...

Or you would probably kill them even more come race day

 

Haha, maybe... if I survived it.

 

They do say 'that which doesn't kill you only makes you stronger'!

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In the absence of any prior scandals, Carey would rank above those you mentioned. Plenty of

Aussies would never had heard of Brad Kahlefeldt, despite his standing in triathlon.

GE included Mark Taylor in the list. Captain and opening bat for one of the most dominant cricket teams in history. You can make a case for Carey being one of the best AFL footballers in history, but I wouldn't put his achievements above Tubby's.

 

Anyway... great read, thanks both!

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GE included Mark Taylor in the list. Captain and opening bat for one of the most dominant cricket teams in history. You can make a case for Carey being one of the best AFL footballers in history, but I wouldn't put his achievements above Tubby's.

 

Anyway... great read, thanks both!

 

Who will be next?

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Cheers Geoff. The Ten Q's was brilliant, I am a bit disappointed we did not get more views.

 

 

Question No.2 still open. Anyone?

 

1.How many total medals (Gold, Silver and Bronze)has Australia won in the Olympic Marathon.

 

 

2. The USA, incidentally has 13 in total. 4 Golds, 3 Silver, 6 Bronze.

 

The 1908 event was won by Johnny Hayes (USA) on disqualification. No look up, but you might have

to. The race winner was famously disqualified. Do you have any idea why?

 

Goughy has answered.

 

It was actually high drama as the 5'2" Italian runner collapsed 4 times in the stadium and also ran the wrong way.

 

Dorando Pietri trained hard for the 1908 Olympics in London. In a race in Carpi he ran 40 km (25 mi) in 2 hours and 38 minutes, an extraordinary result for the times. The marathon, which was to take place on 24 July 1908, started with 56 competitors, including Pietri and fellow Italian Umberto Blasi. It began at 2:33pm. The weather was particularly hot by British summer standards. The London course measured 42.2 km (26 mi); the distance would later become the official marathon length from 1921.[4]

Pietri began his race at a rather slow pace, but in the second half of the course began a powerful surge moving him into second position by the 32 km (20 mi) mark, 4 minutes behind South African Charles Hefferon. When he knew that Hefferon was in crisis, Pietri further increased his pace, overtaking him at the 39 km (24 mi) mark.

The effort took its toll and with only two kilometres to go, Pietri began to feel the effects of extreme fatigue and dehydration. When he entered the stadium, he took the wrong path and when umpires redirected him, he fell down for the first time. He got up with their help, in front of 75,000 spectators.

He fell four more times, and each time the umpires helped him up. In the end, though totally exhausted, he managed to finish the race in first place. Of his total time of 2h 54min 46s, ten minutes were needed for that last 350 metres. Second was American Johnny Hayes. The American team immediately lodged a complaint against the help Pietri received from the umpires. The complaint was accepted and Pietri was disqualified and removed from the final standings of the race.

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Cheers Geoff. The Ten Q's was brilliant, I am a bit disappointed we did not get more views.

 

 

Question No.2 still open. Anyone?

 

1.How many total medals (Gold, Silver and Bronze)has Australia won in the Olympic Marathon.

 

 

2. The USA, incidentally has 13 in total. 4 Golds, 3 Silver, 6 Bronze.

 

The 1908 event was won by Johnny Hayes (USA) on disqualification. No look up, but you might have

to. The race winner was famously disqualified. Do you have any idea why?

 

Goughy has answered.

 

It was actually high drama as the 5'2" Italian runner collapsed 4 times in the stadium and also ran the wrong way.

 

Dorando Pietri trained hard for the 1908 Olympics in London. In a race in Carpi he ran 40 km (25 mi) in 2 hours and 38 minutes, an extraordinary result for the times. The marathon, which was to take place on 24 July 1908, started with 56 competitors, including Pietri and fellow Italian Umberto Blasi. It began at 2:33pm. The weather was particularly hot by British summer standards. The London course measured 42.2 km (26 mi); the distance would later become the official marathon length from 1921.[4]

Pietri began his race at a rather slow pace, but in the second half of the course began a powerful surge moving him into second position by the 32 km (20 mi) mark, 4 minutes behind South African Charles Hefferon. When he knew that Hefferon was in crisis, Pietri further increased his pace, overtaking him at the 39 km (24 mi) mark.

The effort took its toll and with only two kilometres to go, Pietri began to feel the effects of extreme fatigue and dehydration. When he entered the stadium, he took the wrong path and when umpires redirected him, he fell down for the first time. He got up with their help, in front of 75,000 spectators.

He fell four more times, and each time the umpires helped him up. In the end, though totally exhausted, he managed to finish the race in first place. Of his total time of 2h 54min 46s, ten minutes were needed for that last 350 metres. Second was American Johnny Hayes. The American team immediately lodged a complaint against the help Pietri received from the umpires. The complaint was accepted and Pietri was disqualified and removed from the final standings of the race.

 

Video link black and white from 1908.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Kamal2
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Who will be next?

 

TBH I don't rate myself as enough of a sports afficianado to make a credible ranked list out of those.

 

"Personally I’d rate Paul Kelly, Steve Mortimer, Peter Sterling, Arthur Summons, Steve Elkington, Michael Slater, Mark Taylor, Josh Collingwood and even Brad Kahlefeldt as being better sportsmen than Wayne Carey."

 

Paul Kelly is the easiest given it's AFL - he has a good claim given he's a premiership captain (Carey did that twice) and a Brownlow medallist (Carey no times), but I don't rate the Brownlow because it's so biased towards midfielders. Plus Carey at his peak was a player that other teams were simply terrified of, and it's no wonder he's often named as the best of all time. Kelly was fantastic, but you won't ever hear him mentioned in that kind of stratosphere. (Also probably wouldn't bang your wife in your mate's dunny, but I'll leave that stuff out of it...)

 

I'm not much of an NRL fan, but Mortimer and Sterlo both have exceptional records and genuine representative selection to their credit, plus Mortimer's GF wins outrank Carey's. Main issue is the same though - do you rate these guys as literally "the best ever" in their sport. That's a big call. And playing the GF wins card doesn't work, because on that basis Sam Mitchell and Luke Hodge are both better than Carey and even as a Hawks fan I'm not sure that's true. Summons is too far before my time to have any comment of worth TBH.

 

As above I think Tubby rates better than Carey for the reasons mentioned. While I loved Slats a lot more than Taylor, his cavalier batting ended up costing him; I don't think he quite achieved what he could've.

 

Not sure why Elkington is in there unless you consider it much more of an achievement to compete successfully in a genuinely international sport. I'm a bit biased because I find it hard to consider golf on the same level as a contact ball sport. Anything fat guys can win outside of Sumo is a bit dubious to me.

 

(I know it's not the done thing in these sort of internet contests but I'm going to admit that I rule out Collingwood on the basis I had to google pretty hard to even work out who he is. I'm guessing in this case he's better rated by GE on account of being a superior athlete, but it seems a bit of a stretch to me).

 

Finally Kahlefeldt wouldn't get much love outside of a triathlon forum, but if you follow the argument that success in a genuine international competition rates better than our beloved-but-provincial AFL, then he's got a good case too.

 

Overall? I'd probably land where you might have been hinting and pick Carey second to Taylor.

 

But then again I'm violating my "fat guys" rule, haha.

 

Also if you apply a "colossal knob" factor Carey comes comfortably last. And I'm not talking about his appendage.

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