Jump to content
Oompa Loompa

Vegans

Recommended Posts

 

I'm not saying it's not a worthwhile topic, but I think it would be better served by a good write up explaining the pros and cons and the day to day challenges. I'm just not sure this thread really gets that across - I think something more considered would be more valuable.

Agreed, and I'd like to see the same thing for HFLC diets as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ÃÂ

I'm not saying it's not a worthwhile topic, but I think it would be better served by a good write up explaining the pros and cons and the day to day challenges. I'm just not sure this thread really gets that across - I think something more considered would be more valuable.

Guess I sort of see this place as a go to source for budding triathletes. There really arnt that many sources people can find easily enough when getting into the sport and is free. Whilst it might not be the be all and end all of enabling the sport for vegans, it certainly shows it possible. On top of that, it may also attract a few vegans to the sport when they are searching as well.

 

And yes, high carb and low carb stuff would be another good one as was ap's eating with yo yo's plus one.

 

Who knows there might be a budding vegan triathlete out there that wants to win gold in 8 years and it could all start in this thread..... Is it likely, no. Is it possible, you bet.

Edited by Oompa Loompa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Australia already has a vegan multi world champion. It's in snooker, not triathlon but hey, it's a start :smile1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Alex and Esoteric for standing up for what you believe in :thumbsup:.

 

I'm far from being Vegan, but I eat very little meat - purely because of animal welfare issues.

 

If I do eat meat, then I will always chose the biggest beast. Eg, Beef in preference to chicken, and tuna in preference to sardines.

 

For those that say what about ants and spiders etc, I live on an acre block with a lot of trees. I never use insecticides and am often relocating spiders back outside! There have been times when I have lost a trail run because I've gone off the track to run around an ants nest. I don't go fanatical about it, I simply try to avoid hurting other creatures if it's at all possible. Live and let live I reckon - it's my choice so deal with it!

 

I'm sure there's plenty of people who will think I'm nuts and that this is ridiculous, but trust me there's lots of other better reasons for you to think that I'm crazy :unsure:.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only know one person who is vegetarian, except when she goes to McDonalds!

 

Haha, we'd get along just fine. McDonalds is one of my few vices.

 

My preferred pre-race meal (within 24 hours of most races) is a McDonalds Big Mac.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha, we'd get along just fine. McDonalds is one of my few vices.

 

My preferred pre-race meal (within 24 hours of most races) is a McDonalds Big Mac.

you'd get on well with Sutto who has been known to get some KfC into an athlete the day before a race.

 

One thing I am big on is never wasting any food where possible. And I rarely eat meat beyond the amount I need/ want for protien. Also I'm a spider relocater - except funnels and redbacks. They are toast.

 

As a side when I was a kid I worked in a butcher shop. The owner was a top level cyclist (won Goulburn to Liverpool more than once -1950s I think David "Jock" McDougall) and he was a vegetarian!

Edited by Mjainoz
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a tweet in my Twitter feed this am.

 

Most athletes eat too much protein and too much at once. Regardless of size, small amounts more often does best. sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/….

 

86848d7840da3da6768ee192eead19f5.jpg

Edited by Mjainoz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I am big on is never wasting any food where possible.

 

Me too... My kids would often come home with a massive bundle of hot chips from the local milk bar and only eat half of them, so I'd have to clean up the rest myself. I love hot chips, but a massive serve of them a couple of times a week doesn't do much for creating an athlete's body. Bloody kids!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too... My kids would often come home with a massive bundle of hot chips from the local milk bar and only eat half of them, so I'd have to clean up the rest myself. I love hot chips, but a massive serve of them a couple of times a week doesn't do much for creating an athlete's body. Bloody kids!!!

 

Parenting, starts you on the path of Freeganism and it's a slippery slope from there...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a vegan. Been vego a long time but made switch to vegan this year.

Have found it great, personally. Eat amazing stuff and have loads of energy.

Eating can be a bit tricky, but fine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im not dissing u Alex.

 

But i dont eat an animal a day. So how does being vegan for a day save 1 animal ?

These figures are 'calculated' and 'averaged'.

Omnivores who consume 'normal' (Australian's third on the list of meat-consuming nations per person so our version of 'normal' is an outlier) amounts of dairy/meat/poulty contribute to industries which kill over 150 BILLION animals yearly.

So, by NOT choosing to consume/wear/use animal products, one doesn't contribute to these industries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the vegan position on vermin? Say the government decides to cull roos or rabbits or alligators from somewhere through necessity (and let's not debate necessity just now) then would a vegan be OK to eat the meat or wear a kanga skin belt?

 

I wonder if it's different if the animal was going to be killed regardless?

I'm a vegan and have no problem with killing pests (feral pigs/horses etc) which are bad for ecology. I do have a problem when farmers want to cull roos or something so they might graze their cattle with less hinderance.

Others will see it differently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one Steve c. 3 posts and 2 start with 'I'm a vegan'

makes sense doesn't it. Isn't this subject asking if anyone is a vegan and how it impacts them?
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one Steve c. 3 posts and 2 start with 'I'm a vegan'

relevant to discussion pal. only 3 posts *ever* where i've used the word vegan mate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A twitter buddy of mine uses the term "carnists"

Yeah coined by a psychologist named Melanie Joy.

Rich Roll did a podcast with her a few months ago, and there's a pretty good 20min TED talk on youtube by her. worthwhile watching the ted talk.

 

 

Edited by steve_c

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah coined by a psychologist named Melanie Joy.

Rich Roll did a podcast with her a few months ago, and there's a pretty good 20min TED talk on youtube by her. worthwhile watching the ted talk.

 

 

I'd be sus clicking on any link by "Rich Roll". Is he ever called Rick?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be sus clicking on any link by "Rich Roll". Is he ever called Rick?

dunno what he goes by other than rich, but using an ad-hominem won't make the truth go away

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dunno what he goes by other than rich, but using an ad-hominem won't make the truth go away

Sorry, I should have added the smiley face. You've obviously never been Rick Rolled.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dunno what he goes by other than rich, but using an ad-hominem won't make the truth go away

That's the problem with Vegans. No sense of humour.

 

Insert smiley face or whatever.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah coined by a psychologist named Melanie Joy.

 

Not being a Ted talks kinda guy, is it intended as an insult?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Macca now a vegan.

 

 

Peter,

 

I'm getting back into proper training for the first time in three years. You might have heard I've changed my diet around as well. You know I like the challenge, so I've gone vegan on a bet and the kg's are dropping off.

 

Just because I'm a professional athlete doesn't mean I don't struggle with the training. It's even worse because I know what I am, or what I used to be, capable of.

 

What we professionals have is access to the best resources and experts in the world to help us. And I'd like to help you. I'd really like to know what you're struggling with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading between the lines he is about to release a sports nutrition.

 

100% tip it's vegan friendly.

 

Wait and see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm struggling with fake, trendy vegans, Macca.

For some its ethical, it is a dietary choice for others. Would you struggle if it was HFLC or any other popular food choice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/08/2016 at 3:05 PM, trinube said:

 

I have a friend who is coeliac and she goes to Hungry Jacks or Maccas and asks for hamburgers without the roll. I have no idea how they'd react to that but I suspect it would be greeted with equally quizzical looks.

My son is a Coeliac, as far as i know (according to Coeliac Australia)  there are zero Hungry Jacks in Australia that are Coeliac friendly, sure they may take the burger bun away but the risk of cross contamination is extremely risky.  There are one or two McDonald's in Australia that are Coeliac Friendly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the one year my wife spent eating gluten free after being diagnosed with coeliacs.  It was miserable, and after a year they worked out they were wrong.  I reckon cross contamination is the bigger issue, in particular when very sensitive to it.  I think some would get away with a bit of it fine.

Edited by goughy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to disagree with your last sentence Goughy, if you are Coeliac you cannot afford to have any Gluten, the smallest exposure to gluten is doing damage.  Sure some that may get glutened may show very little outward signs of having been glutened, our sons specialists have shown us pics of what damage can be done.  when our son was officially diagnosed at 3 yrs old we were shown the damage that had incurred in his gut after he had his endoscopy...the doctors were alarmed.

my wife, daughter and I are all gluten free also, not because we are Coeliac, but because the risk of contaminating our son is far too high if we have gluten in our house.  It's a nightmare and so bloody expensive. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Kieran, I maybe should have said gluten intolerance, rather than full blown coeliac disease.  When my wife was on it it was a pain, and yes, expensive.  But we'd have friends coming out of the woodwork who would say "so do we", but would always sneak little bits and say it's ok, cause that little bit doesn't bother us.  So I just always just figured them as being varying degrees of intolerance, rather than actual coeliacs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, goughy said:

I remember the one year my wife spent eating gluten free after being diagnosed with coeliacs.  It was miserable, and after a year they worked out they were wrong.  I reckon cross contamination is the bigger issue, in particular when very sensitive to it.  I think some would get away with a bit of it fine.

My Mum is the same, has been diagnosed in the past decade 3 times as being coeliac, then after a year+ in each case further testing says she isn't.  For a women in her late 70s it seems to be too much for doctors to just say you're getting old these days, the quacks just keep on wanting to do more tests.  In the last 2 years now I've had to do with calls from her that she is dying and knows she has cancer and is just waiting for the doctor to confirm it the next day, and I need to do x, y and z once she goes and look after Dad.  For god's sake, how many other women in their late 70s are still running a large farm and dragging sheep up hills most on this forum would stop to walk in a race?

For Mum though, when she does have some gluten again in every case, she can't handle it at first.  It's as though her body needs to get used to it again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny enough, with the Vegans thread popping up today, I saw an ABC article on Facebook about Vegan Leather!  We have a name for that in my industry, it's called Vinyl!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im a bit confused how you can be gluten free for a year after being diagnosed with Ceoliac and then a test says oh no you're actually not ceoliac.  Before testing you have to go on a high gluten diet so the damage is obvious, if you have been gluten free for a year then I'd suggest the test is going to show nothing but a perfectly healthy intestine lining.

 

Re gluten free being awful, I guess it depends on the person, you can make some bloody nice healthy meals using real food that isnt expensive and is bloody tasty, just takes a bit more effort than opening a packet of chips/pouring pasta in a pot or buying a loaf of bread.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, RunBrettRun said:

Im a bit confused how you can be gluten free for a year after being diagnosed with Ceoliac and then a test says oh no you're actually not ceoliac.  Before testing you have to go on a high gluten diet so the damage is obvious, if you have been gluten free for a year then I'd suggest the test is going to show nothing but a perfectly healthy intestine lining.

 

Re gluten free being awful, I guess it depends on the person, you can make some bloody nice healthy meals using real food that isnt expensive and is bloody tasty, just takes a bit more effort than opening a packet of chips/pouring pasta in a pot or buying a loaf of bread.

The gut wont be fully healed in a year, it takes time, our sons will healer quicker than people who are older as he was only 3 when diagnosed.  but yes to be diagnosed you need to be on a gluten diet, then bloods will give an indication, then finally to be officially diagnosed Coeliac you need to have the endoscopy.

He gets bloods done every 12 months currently, we are doing a good job, the bloods are coming back NIL for gluten.  

I agree with being able to make great gluten free foods from natural foods, we make everything, but it does mean we spend a bucket load of time in the kitchen.  Eating out up here in Karratha is not possible, no one caters to Coeliacs, they only cater to gluten free lifestylers (which means they still cook gluten free chips for example in the same fryer as normal chips.. they use the same cutting boards, same knives, thats the cross contamination risk we face, most restaurants / cafes here have zero understanding of that risk.

I had a massive barney with a baker in Exmouth the other week when they tried telling me there bread was 85% gluten free after i queried there gluten free sign out the front, not only did they have zero idea that you cant be a certain percentage gluten free but they had their "gluten free" products on the same display shelves as other non GF foods!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RunBrettRun said:

Im a bit confused how you can be gluten free for a year after being diagnosed with Ceoliac and then a test says oh no you're actually not ceoliac.

Basically this would have been around the time she started to get sick, but obviously it was years before her actual diagnosis of what was really wrong.

So I'll try and remember how things went, it was more than a decade ago now, and I can't remember what I had for breakfast!

It was the docs suspected diagnosis for how she was feeling etc, so she went through the testing, colonoscopy, gastroscopy etc which showed the suspected damage or whatever.  So she went on the gluten free diet for 3 months and I think had more testing which showed some recovery, so there you have it, you're coeliac.  Then after another 12 months I think she was tested again as her general issues were still there.  If I remember things were much better from the tests, so they wanted her to try going back on gluten for a while (I think it was like 3 months again) and test again and this test showed no change, so, basically they were wrong with the diagnosis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, KieranR said:

The gut wont be fully healed in a year, it takes time, our sons will healer quicker than people who are older as he was only 3 when diagnosed.  but yes to be diagnosed you need to be on a gluten diet, then bloods will give an indication, then finally to be officially diagnosed Coeliac you need to have the endoscopy.

He gets bloods done every 12 months currently, we are doing a good job, the bloods are coming back NIL for gluten.  

I agree with being able to make great gluten free foods from natural foods, we make everything, but it does mean we spend a bucket load of time in the kitchen.  Eating out up here in Karratha is not possible, no one caters to Coeliacs, they only cater to gluten free lifestylers (which means they still cook gluten free chips for example in the same fryer as normal chips.. they use the same cutting boards, same knives, thats the cross contamination risk we face, most restaurants / cafes here have zero understanding of that risk.

I had a massive barney with a baker in Exmouth the other week when they tried telling me there bread was 85% gluten free after i queried there gluten free sign out the front, not only did they have zero idea that you cant be a certain percentage gluten free but they had their "gluten free" products on the same display shelves as other non GF foods!

 

Yeah I know what it's like mate I have been through it (not me) but with my ex.  Its disappointing when people in the food industry don't even understand about this issue and what it potentially means for someone with coeliac.  It's also a disease that obviously affects some people a lot worse than others.  

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×