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HFLC ruined my life......

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Like anything at the start you have to invest a little more effort then it just kicks in. I used My fitness Pal to log foods for about 3 months. When you started doing TRI you used to have to invest more time learning the basics. Then you just did what works. Same with food really. But just like in TRI or life every now and then you need to revisit what you do and see if you can do it better.Â

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It isn't all about Bacon and Eggs. I try for 2 serves of vege per meal. 2 Serves of Fat. 1 serve of protein.Â

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For example breakfast could be.Â

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • ½ avocado
  • 150ml organic coconut cream
  • ½ cup frozen organic raspberries
  • 2 cups spinach
  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 serve (30g) Bare Blends WPI or vegan protein
  • 1 tray ice

Method

  • Add water and chia seeds to the blender and let sit for 15 minutes for the chia seeds to go to work.
  • Add avo, coconut cream, berries, spinach, coconut oil and ice and blend well.
  • Add cinnamon and protein and blend until thick but smooth.
  • Pour into a glass or jar and enjoy.

1 tray of ice?how big is this smoothie? Any other breakfast ideas. ?

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Yep the whole hypothethis:

 

Eat saturated fat>>increase cholesterol>>>blocking of arteries + heart attack

 

Is flawed at every level. It has been helpful for turning useless and poisonous statin pills into the biggest selling drug in the world, bar none.

 

Cholesterol is like the fire truck at the fire. Always there, but not at fault.

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Stange when you look at the diet of the Kenyans (who have been the best runners in long distance Athletics)

 

https://runnersconnect.net/running-nutrition-articles/diet-of-kenyan-runners/

 

I have only pasted part of the article

 

Daily macronutrient intake of Kenyan runners

Not surprisingly, a majority of the calories in the Kenyan diet came from carbohydrates. In the ten runners studied, 76.5 percent of daily calories were consumed as carbohydrates.

Given their body statistics, this meant each runner was consuming about 10.4 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight.

Moreover, given how they spread out their eating times and training sessions, each athlete was consuming about 600 grams of carbohydrate per day, with almost 120 grams of carbohydrate at every meal.

Protein intake amounted to 10.1 percent of calorie intake. That equals roughly 1.3 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

About 13.4 percent of daily calories came from fat

How does a Kenyan diet compare to recommendations for endurance athletes

Despite not knowing much about the science of sports nutrition, the diet of these Kenyan runners was surprisingly close to that recommended by sports nutritionist.

 

Carbohydrates

Most sports-nutrition experts recommend that runners who are training at high mileage consume about nine or ten grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass per day. While an average of 10.4 grams is just a little over the recommended consumption, it’s clear the Kenyans were following scientific protocol without realizing it.

This number may seem like a lot (and it is for sedentary people), especially given the latest trends towards Paleo and less carbohydrate-rich diets. However, as athletes trying to compete at the highest level of their sport, replenishing glycogen stores and fueling their body for recovery is essential to the high-intensity training they were conducting.

 

Protein

In regards to protein, the Kenyans’ diet was once again closely in line with the recommendation of top sports-nutritionists, who suggest consuming 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. Since these runners were training for a 12km distance, not a marathon, the 1.2 grams they were consuming is appropriate for their muscle recovery and rebuilding needs.

What types of foods did they eat

This particular study didn’t break down an exact daily diet, but the researchers did provide data for the amount of calories from many of the most commonly consumed foods. Plus, having trained with some Kenyans myself, I have a pretty good understanding of what these foods were. The data may surprise you.

Sugar – plain sugar – accounted for 20 percent of daily calories. The Kenyans love their tea (in fact, tea consumption was greater than water consumption – 1.243 liters per day on average) and they love putting lots of milk and sugar in their tea. Having trained with some Kenyans myself, I can attest to just how much tea they drink and how much milk and sugar they use. It’s incredible.However, a large amount of this sugar also comes from fruits. Immediately after most runs, Kenyans consume some type of fruit, typically watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew. The simple sugar and water from the fruit speeds glycogen to their muscles post workout.

Ugali supplied the greatest number of total calories, making up 23 percent of the daily diet. Ugali is simply a dish of maize flour (cornmeal) cooked with water. Kenyan runners eat this for dinner almost every night. Generally, it’s mixed with a chicken or beef stew and vegetables.When made correctly it actually taste better than it sounds. My college teammate Jordan and I once tried living off Ugali for an entire summer. Unfortunately, our cooking skills sucked and it tasted terrible. But, we were broke so we ate it anyway.
While so far, the diet of a Kenyan runner looks rather unhealthy due to our “sugar is bad” culture, Kenyans do eat rather healthy. About 86 percent of daily calories came from vegetable sources, with 14 percent from animal foods. Moreover, they didn’t have access to junk food (at least in the training camp) that most Americans do.

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It's a good question and have been thinking about that myself for a while. There is some benefits to glucose when exercising at high intensity.

 

On the other hand you could say if sugar is a harmless treat why does it rot your teeth?

Diesel generally goes in slow moving but big engine vehicles like a truck - so fat is like diesel, burns slow and produces slow output

 

Petrol goes in most cars and burns faster - so petrol is carbohydrate burns faster and produces medium output

 

Premium Petrol (the dear stuff) in performance cars burns really fast - so premium petrol is sugar/glucose which creates quick but limited energy

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Yeah I get all that stuff, but doesn't answer your previous question of why sugar seems to help us if we are doing high intensity exercise but it still causes damages to our body and may even be considered toxic.

 

I guess smoking, booze, and other drugs are enjoyed by people for a buzz.

 

I saw top cardiologist and anti carb campaigner Aseem Malhotra state that 'sugar is not a nutrient' but i think it is.

 

Is a bit of a paradox.

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Stange when you look at the diet of the Kenyans (who have been the best runners in long distance Athletics)

Â

https://runnersconnect.net/running-nutrition-articles/diet-of-kenyan-runners/

Â

I have only pasted part of the article

Â

Daily macronutrient intake of Kenyan runners

Not surprisingly, a majority of the calories in the Kenyan diet came from carbohydrates. In the ten runners studied, 76.5 percent of daily calories were consumed as carbohydrates.

Given their body statistics, this meant each runner was consuming about 10.4 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight.

Moreover, given how they spread out their eating times and training sessions, each athlete was consuming about 600 grams of carbohydrate per day, with almost 120 grams of carbohydrate at every meal.

Protein intake amounted to 10.1 percent of calorie intake. That equals roughly 1.3 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

About 13.4 percent of daily calories came from fat

How does a Kenyan diet compare to recommendations for endurance athletes

Despite not knowing much about the science of sports nutrition, the diet of these Kenyan runners was surprisingly close to that recommended by sports nutritionist.

Â

Carbohydrates

Most sports-nutrition experts recommend that runners who are training at high mileage consume about nine or ten grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass per day. While an average of 10.4 grams is just a little over the recommended consumption, itâs clear the Kenyans were following scientific protocol without realizing it.

This number may seem like a lot (and it is for sedentary people), especially given the latest trends towards Paleo and less carbohydrate-rich diets. However, as athletes trying to compete at the highest level of their sport, replenishing glycogen stores and fueling their body for recovery is essential to the high-intensity training they were conducting.

Â

Protein

In regards to protein, the Kenyansâ diet was once again closely in line with the recommendation of top sports-nutritionists, who suggest consuming 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. Since these runners were training for a 12km distance, not a marathon, the 1.2 grams they were consuming is appropriate for their muscle recovery and rebuilding needs.

What types of foods did they eat

This particular study didnât break down an exact daily diet, but the researchers did provide data for the amount of calories from many of the most commonly consumed foods. Plus, having trained with some Kenyans myself, I have a pretty good understanding of what these foods were. The data may surprise you.

Â

Sugar â plain sugar â accounted for 20 percent of daily calories. The Kenyans love their tea (in fact, tea consumption was greater than water consumption â 1.243 liters per day on average) and they love putting lots of milk and sugar in their tea. Having trained with some Kenyans myself, I can attest to just how much tea they drink and how much milk and sugar they use. Itâs incredible.However, a large amount of this sugar also comes from fruits. Immediately after most runs, Kenyans consume some type of fruit, typically watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew. The simple sugar and water from the fruit speeds glycogen to their muscles post workout.

Â

Ugali supplied the greatest number of total calories, making up 23 percent of the daily diet. Ugali is simply a dish of maize flour (cornmeal) cooked with water. Kenyan runners eat this for dinner almost every night. Generally, itâs mixed with a chicken or beef stew and vegetables.When made correctly it actually taste better than it sounds. My college teammate Jordan and I once tried living off Ugali for an entire summer. Unfortunately, our cooking skills sucked and it tasted terrible. But, we were broke so we ate it anyway.

While so far, the diet of a Kenyan runner looks rather unhealthy due to our âsugar is badâ culture, Kenyans do eat rather healthy. About 86 percent of daily calories came from vegetable sources, with 14 percent from animal foods. Moreover, they didnât have access to junk food (at least in the training camp) that most Americans do.

 

Anyone has enough stored fuel for 2hrs of training / racing. The same time it takes these guys to run a marathon. Add in a few drinks they consume during the event and boom.

 

Thing is 99% of people can't do this. The study also doesn't highlight the effects to their long term health post racing.

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Anyone has enough stored fuel for 2hrs of training / racing. The same time it takes these guys to run a marathon. Add in a few drinks they consume during the event and boom.

 

Thing is 99% of people can't do this. The study also doesn't highlight the effects to their long term health post racing.

Difficult to do, but their long term health is probably a lot better than most of their compatriots that eat anything they can find, and don't care whether it is FP or C.

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Yep the whole hypothethis:

 

Eat saturated fat>>increase cholesterol>>>blocking of arteries + heart attack

 

Is flawed at every level. It has been helpful for turning useless and poisonous statin pills into the biggest selling drug in the world, bar none.

 

Cholesterol is like the fire truck at the fire. Always there, but not at fault.

evidence

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There is a truckload of evidence could post 100 links here but would take pages.

 

The evidence for statins and low fat diets is far far worse.

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There is a truckload of evidence could post 100 links here but would take pages.

 

The evidence for statins and low fat diets is far far worse.

real evidence not opinion pieces or blogs, research with robust method. I am not contesting that it is a valid solution but the amount of people who suddenly become experts in medicine and nutrition is astounding.

 

Lots claim to know the answer and tell everyone quite strongly that they are wrong, despite having in most cases n=1 or a few friends who got results.

 

It could be that the few friends showed some discipline with eating for the first time in their lives and lost weight. As for the health aspects don't know, I don't smash carbs except at breakfast as it is too hard to cook up.

 

Not sure why we can't just ban alcohol

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If you want an N=1 study, I had a stomach problem a few years ago, and with the slightest bit of fat, would just regurgitate the whole meal. I went 3 months on a completely fat free diet. I lost 14kg.

 

There were other factors around my weight loss, but one could simply look at it and say I lost 1kg a week by eliminating fat from my diet.

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evidence

You asked for it.

Studies

 

 

Saturated FatâNot the cause of heart disease

 

In 1953, Ancel Keys came up with a theory that saturated fat intake increased risk for heart disease. His theory was never proven (with a complete, scientific study), but it started a snowball, and became the newest big thing. There were actually many scientists at the time who disagreed, but as the idea gained more and more momentum, and was taken on board by government, those who opposed were disregarded.

 

We now have loads of evidence discrediting the theory, however, itâs very slow for people to take it on. Iâm sure nobody wants to admit to such a blunder. Itâs so ingrained in our society; it would take a lot of guts to say, âHey, we were wrong; letâs change our entire diet.â

 

Many studies have been initiated to prove Ancelâs theory, but all of them have ended up proving the opposite. The scientific foundation of the current âlow-fatâ dietary advice has fallen, with no evidence to support the idea. It is only a matter of time before everyone is aware of this fact, and every health professional will have to acknowledge it. Quite a few doctors all over the world are now re-educating people that fat was never the issue. Here is a history of the major scientific studies:

 

1972 â Minnesota coronary study. Result: Cholesterol-lowering diet causes greater mortality

 

The Minnesota Coronary Study was done as early as 1972 and showed that people on a cholesterol-lowering diet had significantly greater mortality than those on a regular diet. Did we hear about it? No. The results were finally published in 1989. 17 years later! When interviewing Ivan Frantz Jr, Gary Taubes asked why the results werenât published in 1972, and the response was âWe didnât like the results.â Ancel Keys was a collaborator for the study.

 

Study abstract

 

1984 â Multiple risk factor intervention trial. Result: Reducing saturated fat intake had no effect on preventing heart disease.

 

The group following the intervention reduced their cholesterol consumption by 42%, saturated fat by 28%, and it had no effect on preventing heart disease.

 

âThe overall results do not show a beneficial effect on coronary heart disease or total mortality from this multifactor intervention.â

 

Abstract

 

1988 â Attempt to prove sat fat caused heart disease. Result: Project cancelled after 11 yrs â no evidence

 

In 1988, the surgeon generalâs office (head of the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC)) decided to gather all the evidence linking saturated fat to heart disease. In 1999, after 11 years, they were unable to prove it, and they killed the project. The comment from Bill Harlan was âThe report was initiated with a preconceived opinion of the conclusions, but the science behind those opinions was clearly not holding up. Clearly the thoughts of yesterday were not going to serve us very well.â

 

No report was ever released, but Gary Taubes (science journalist educated at Harvard and Stanford) interviewed the people involved in the project: Marion Nestle, who helped launch the project and now runs the nutrition and food studies department at New York University (NYU), and Bill Harlan, a member of the oversight committee and associate director of the Office of Disease Prevention at NIH. I spoke to Gary personally, but the findings are also documented here:

 

Science 30 March 2001:

Vol. 291. no. 5513, pp. 2536 â 2545

DOI: 10.1126/science.291.5513.2536

 

1990 â Review existing data on relations between mortality rates and cholesterol levels. Result â Those with the lowest cholesterol levels had highest mortality.

 

Conference to review and discuss existing data on U-shaped relations found between mortality rates and blood total cholesterol levels (TC). Study done on 1 million people. Largest analysis of effects of cholesterol on mortality that has ever been done.

 

Abstract

 

1991 â Long-term Mortality After 5-Year Multifactorial Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases in Middle-aged Men. Result: Cholesterol-lowering diets twice as likely to cause death

 

Following up after the initial study (which was considered a success at proving the diet-heart hypothesis because heart disease ârisk factorsâ like cholesterol levels were reduced), they discovered that those who had continued with the cholesterol-lowering diet were twice as likely to die from heart disease.

 

âAs a multiple intervention against risk factors for coronary heart disease in middle-aged men at only moderate risk seem to have failed to reduce both morbidity and mortality such interventions become increasingly difficult to justify. This runs counter to the recommendation of many national and international advisory bodies which must now take the recent findings from Finland into consideration. Not to do so may be ethically unacceptable.â Professor Michael Oliver

 

Abstract

 

Article â Multiple interventions in middle-aged men may do more harm than good.

 

1999 â largest diet-heart trial ever conducted. Result: Fat intake doesnât affect cholesterol

 

The Lyon Diet Heart Study by the French National Institute of Health and Medical research. 605 heart attach survivors, on two different diets. Both groups consumed completely diff amounts of fat, but the HDL, LDL and total cholesterol levels in the two groups remained virtually identical.

 

Abstract

 

2001 â Study attempting to prove cholesterol should be kept low. Result: Worst mortality rates in those maintaining low cholesterol

 

Starting with the premise that choleseterol should be kept low to lessen risk of heart disease, they studied cholesterol levels for 20 years and compared them to mortality. Low cholesterol levels had a significant association with mortality. The worst mortality rates in those who maintained low cholesterol for significant periods of their life.

 

âWe have been unable to explain our results. These data cast doubt on the scientific justification for lowering cholesterol to very low concentrations (<4.65 mmol/L) in elderly people.â

 

Abstract

 

2004 â Study looking at impact of cholesterol levels on mortality. Result: Low cholesterol significantly associated to mortality

 

15 year study. In men, across the entire age range (25 to 90), and in older women, low cholesterol level was significantly associated with all-cause mortality, showing significant associations with death through cancer, liver diseases, and mental disease.

 

Abstract

 

2005 â Study to determine whether fat intake increases risk for heart disease or cancer deaths. Result: High fat diets donât increase mortality from either heart disease or cancer.

 

âObjective: Most current dietary guidelines encourage limiting relative fat intake to <30% of total daily energy, with saturated and trans fatty acids contributing no more than 10%. We examined whether total fat intake, saturated fat, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat intake are independent risk factors for prospective all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.â

 

âResult: With the exception of cancer mortality for women, individuals receiving more than 30% of their total daily energy from fat and more than 10% from saturated fat, did not have increased mortality. Current dietary guidelines concerning fat intake are thus generally not supported by our observational results.â

 

Researcherâs conclusions: âWith our results added to the pool of evidence from large-scale prospective cohort studies on dietary fat, disease and mortality, traditional dietary guidelines concerning fat intake are thus generally not strongly supportedâ

 

Abstract

 

2006 â Low-Fat Dietary Pattern and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease. Result: Dietary intervention died not reduce risk of CHD or stroke.

 

Objective: To test the hypothesis that a diet low in fat and high in vegetables, fruits, and grains to reduce cancer, would reduce CVD risk. Result: Over a mean of 8.1 years, a dietary intervention that reduced total fat intake and increased intakes of vegetables, fruits, and grains did not significantly reduce the risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD in postmenopausal women and achieved only modest effects on CVD risk factors.

 

Even with these blatantly obvious results, members of the conventional medical community made statements like this to explain away the results:

 

âThere may have been some âdisappointmentâ that the studies didnât always give clear answers, the findings are what they are⦠Now weâre in a second wave of putting the findings into perspectiveâ.

 

And âNumerous studies have confirmed there are huge heart benefits from maintaining a healthy lifestyle which involves a balanced diet and regular physical activity. It is easy to identify a number of important reasons why this study did not agree with previous research.â None of those important reasons were identified.

 

Abstract

 

2010 â Study. Result: No correlation between sat fat intake and heart disease

 

The study pooled data from 21 studies, including 348,000 adults, surveyed dietary habits and health events from five to twenty-three years, and found no difference in the risks of heart disease and stroke between people with the lowest and highest intakes of saturated fat.

 

Abstract [Epub ahead of print]

 

Abstract

 

2011 â Study. Result: Fat intake had no impact on heart disease

 

Study to determine whether reduced dietary fat prevented heart disease, July 2011. Results: âThere were no clear effects of dietary fat changes on total mortality or cardiovascular mortalityâ

 

Abstract

 

2011 â Study. Result: Cholesterol is good for us.

 

Researchers find that âbadâ cholesterol is actually good for us.

 

Science Daily May 8, 2011

 

Abstract

 

2011 â Study â health benefits of coconut oil

 

Studies show coconut oil helps women lose weight and elevates good cholesterol.

 

Abstract

 

2013 â Study â Result: Replacing saturated fat with vegetable oils increases risk for heart disease and death

 

âAdvice to substitute polyunsaturated fats for saturated fats is a key component of worldwide dietary guidelines for coronary heart disease risk reduction. However, clinical benefits of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid, omega 6 linoleic acid, have not been established. In this cohort, substituting dietary linoleic acid in place of saturated fats increased the rates of death from all causes, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease. An updated meta-analysis of linoleic acid intervention trials showed no evidence of cardiovascular benefit. These findings could have important implications for worldwide dietary advice to substitute omega 6 linoleic acid, or polyunsaturated fats in general, for saturated fats.â

 

Full study

 

2015 â Statins cause heart disease

 

âWe have collected a wealth of information on cholesterol and statins from many published papers and find overwhelming evidence that these drugs accelerate hardening of the arteries and can cause, or worsen, heart failure.â

 

âThe hypothesis that Statins protect the heart by lowering cholesterol is flawed and that high cholesterol is not necessarily linked to heart disease.â

 

âI cannot find any evidence to support people taking Statins and patients who are on them should stop.â Lead Researcher, Dr Okuyama

 

Dr Peter Langsjoen, a heart specialist in Texas and co-author of the study, says, âStatins are being used so aggressively and in such large numbers of people that the adverse effects are now becoming obvious. These drugs should never have been approved for use. The long-term effects are devastating.â

 

Full study

 

Cholesterol

 

1948 â today â Framingham Heart Study. Result: No association between fat intake and heart disease. No association between fat intake and cholesterol.

 

Longest running study, which started in 1948 and is still going (longest heart study that has ever been done).

 

âIn Framingham, Massachusetts, the more saturated fat one ate, the more cholesterol one ate, the more calories one ate, the lower peopleâs serum cholesterol.â Dr William Castelli, director of the Framingham Study, 1992. The researchers also stated that they found no association between fat intake and coronary disease.

 

Website for multiple studies

 

1989 â Cholesterol as risk factor for mortality in elderly women. Result: Mortality 5.2 times higher with low cholesterol levels

 

âMortality was lowest at serum cholesterol 7.0 mmol/l, 5.2 times higher than the minimum at serum cholesterol 4.0 mmol/lâ

 

Mortality was 5.2 times higher with the low cholesterol of 4.0 as opposed to the âhighâ cholesterol of 7.0.

 

Abstract

 

1991 â Serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease relationship. Result: no overall relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease risk

 

âAlthough coronary heart disease remains a leading cause of death and disability in old age, the relationship of serum cholesterol level to risk of coronary heart disease in old age is controversial. Data for 2,388 white persons aged 65-74 ⦠were examined to determine the relationship of serum cholesterol level to coronary heart disease incidence â¦there was no overall relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease risk in either men or women.â

 

Abstract

 

1992 â Association of Serum Cholesterol with Mortality. Result: High cholesterol levels decreases risk of mortality during first 10 yrs of follow-up

 

âDuring the first 10 years of follow-upâ¦men with high cholesterol levels had lower all-cause mortality⦠because of their low cancer mortalityâ

 

Abstract

 

1995 â Study â cholesterol, blood pressure, and stroke. Result: No association between cholesterol levels and stroke.

 

Study done over 16 years, on 450,000 people, and 13,000 strokes (between them). âThere was no association between blood cholesterol and strokeâ

 

Abstract

 

1995 â Low serum total cholesterol concentrations and mortality. Result: Lower cholesterol directly linked to greater mortality.

 

âLow serum cholesterol concentrations (< 4.8 mmol/l), present in 5% (n = 410) of the men, were associated with the highest mortality from all causes, largely due to a significant increase in cancer deaths (age adjusted relative risk 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.3); < 4.8 v 4.8-5.9 mmol/l) and in other non-cardiovascular deaths (age adjusted relative risk 1.9 (1.1 to 3.1)).â

 

Abstract

 

1995 â Lack of association between cholesterol and coronary heart disease mortality. Result: High total cholesterol and low HDL (good) cholesterol not associated with increased heart disease or mortality

 

âElevated total serum cholesterol level, low HDL-C, and high total serum cholesterol to HDL-C ratio were not associated with a significantly higher rate of all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, or hospitalization for myocardial infarction or unstable angina after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors.â

 

Conclusion: âOur findings do not support the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia or low HDL-C are important risk factors for all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, or hospitalization for myocardial infarction or unstable angina in this cohort of persons older than 70 years.â

 

Abstract

 

1998 â Total cholesterol and risk of mortality in the oldest old. Result: High cholesterol associated with longevity

 

âIn people older than 85 years, high total cholesterol concentrations are associated with longevity owing to lower mortality from cancer and infection.â

 

Abstract

 

2002 â Study to determine the effect of a low-carb, high fat diet on body weight and cholesterol. Result: Sustained weight loss and significant reduction in cholesterol.

 

To determine the effect of a 6-month very low carbohydrate diet program on body weight and other metabolic parameters. Low carb, high fat.

 

Serum total cholesterol level decreased, LDL decreased, triglyceride level decreased, HDL increased. There were no .A very low carbohydrate diet program led to sustained weight loss during a 6-month period.

 

Abstract

 

2002 â Total and HDL cholesterol and risk of stroke. Result: No association between cholesterol levels and stroke.

 

âThis analysis of the EUROSTROKE project could not disclose an association of total cholesterol with fatal, non-fatal, haemorrhagic or ischaemic stroke.â

 

Abstract

 

2003 - classical risk factors and their control in coronary patients. Results: Elevated cholesterol not associated with higher mortality.

 

âsmoking, previous coronary heart disease and diabetes proved significant predictors of total, cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Obesity, low education, raised blood pressure, elevated total cholesterol and low HDL cholesterol, however, were not significantly associated with higher mortality rates.â

 

The obvious results were again explained away, âFailure to find statistically significant associations between other classical risk factors, such as blood pressure and plasma lipid levels, and mortality may be related to the extensive use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs in this cohort.â

 

Abstract

 

2004 â Study comparing the effects of a low-carbohydrate, high fat diet on LDL levels. Result: High fat diet decreased LDL levels

 

Study designed to prove that the Atkins high fat, low carb diet was dangerous. The conventional (fat and calorie restricted) diet and the Atkins diet were compared, using obese subjects. Results: Subjects on the high fat, low carbohydrate diet had a greater decrease in LDL levels.

 

Abstract

 

2004 â Study to compare the effects of a low-carbohydrate, high fat diet with those of a low-fat, low-cholesterol, reduced-calorie diet. Result: High fat, low carb diet greater weight loss and showed a significant reduction in cholesterol.

 

Compared with a low-fat diet, a low-carbohydrate diet program had better participant retention and greater weight loss. During active weight loss, serum triglyceride levels decreased more and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level increased more with the low-carbohydrate diet than with the low-fat diet.

 

Abstract

 

2006 â Effect of high fat, low carb diet on blood cholesterol levels. Result: LDL levels remained unchanged. LDL particles changed to larger, healthier LDL particles.

 

While the diet did not lower total LDL cholesterol, it did result in a shift from small, dense LDL to large, buoyant LDL, which could lower cardiovascular disease risk.

 

Westman studied 120 overweight volunteers, who were randomly assigned to the Atkins diet or the heart associationâs Step 1 diet, a widely used low-fat approach. On the Atkins diet, people limited their carbs to less than 20 grams a day, and 60% of their calories came from fat.

 

âIt was high fat, off the scale,â he said.

 

After six months, the people on the Atkins diet had lost an average of 31 pounds, compared with 20 pounds on the AHA diet, and more people stuck with the Atkins regimen.

 

Total cholesterol fell slightly in both groups. However, those on the Atkins diet had an 11% increase in HDL, the good cholesterol, and a 49% drop in triglycerides. On the AHA diet, HDL was unchanged, and triglycerides dropped 22%. High triglycerides may raise the risk of heart disease.

 

While the volunteersâ total amounts of LDL, the bad cholesterol, did not change much on either diet, there was evidence that it had shifted to a form that may be less likely to clog the arteries.

 

Abstract

 

Study: Atkins diet good for cholesterol

 

Sugar/Fructose â the real culprit behind heart disease and other modern disease

 

Sugar (including fructose) is toxic and causes heart disease, diabetes, cancer and more. Not because of the calories. âour excessive consumption of sugar is the primary reason that the numbers of obese and diabetic Americans have skyrocketed in the past 30 years,â says Dr Lustig.

 

Robert H. Lustig, MD, is the UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, presented the University of California Osher Centre for Integrative Medicine.

 

Sugar: The bitter truth

 

The New York Times April 17, 2011

 

Dr Lustigâs published findings:

 

The Fructose Epidemic â Excess sugar and fructose primary contributor to human disease. Low-fat movement increased carbohydrate consumption, which coincided with obesity epidemic.

 

Fructose: Metabolic, Hedonic, and Societal parallels with Ethanol â Most people consider fructose and sugar just empty calories. Fructose causes specific biologic effects, beyond the caloric intake, causing metabolic syndrome, which has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular disease and many other health issues.

 

The role of Fructose in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and the metabolic syndrome â Excess fructose and sugar consumption a direct link to instances of Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD).

 

Just a spoonful of sugar helps the blood pressure go up â Current over-consumption of fructose directly linked to cardiovascular issues, including hypertension.

 

Fructose, Sugar, and Childhood Obesity â Excess fructose consumption linked directly to childhood obesity.

 

2011 â Study â Excess fructose linked directly to increased heart disease risk

 

Consumption of excess fructose and sugar increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

 

Abstract

 

2010 â Study â Refined carbohydrates linked to heart disease

 

Too much bread and refined carbohydrates causes heart disease. Women who ate the most high glycemic foods had more than double the risk of developing heart disease as women who ate the fewest.

 

Abstract

 

2011 â Study â Alzheimerâs linked to sugar intake

 

Alzheimerâs linked to insulin resistance and blood sugar. Source is an interview with Dr. Larry McCleary, 19th Annual World Congress on Anti-Aging and Aesthetic Medicine, held in Orlando, FL, April 7-9, 2011, discussing the results of his studies.

 

Medical Breakthroughs April 13, 2011

 

2010 â Scientific study â Sugar feeds cancer

 

Science News

 

Abstract

 

2009 â Studies â fructose and sugar consumption increases risk for modern disease

 

Dr Richard Johnson clinical trial showing fructose and sugar increases risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, kidney disease, and obesity.

 

âWeâve just finished a clinical trial where we gave a low fructose diet to overweight and obese adults from Mexico City.â Dr. Johnson says.

 

âWe tried two different low fructose diets, but first, before we go into that, we think that the effects of fructose are independent of its energy intake. So, table sugar (sucrose) â which contains fructose and glucose â although there is a caloric component, we think that the effects of fructose are not specifically related to the calories but rather to its mechanism, of which uric acid is a driving part.

 

⦠[uric acid levels] being too high seems to really increase the risk for diabetes and high blood pressure, kidney disease and obesity. And in fact, there are more and more papers coming out showing that connection.â

 

Study abstract: Johnson RJ, Perez-Pozo SE, Sautin YY, Manitius J, Sanchez-Lozada LG, Feig DI, Shafiu M, Segal M, Glassock RJ, Shimada M, Roncal C, Nakagawa T. Hypothesis: Could Excessive Fructose Intake and Uric Acid Cause Type 2 Diabetes? Endocr Rev 2009; 30: 96-116

 

2006 â Study â Sugar feeds cancer

 

Study by Harvard Medical researchers. Attenuation of LDH-A expression uncovers a link between glycolysis, mitochondrial physiology, and tumor maintenance

 

Abstract

 

 

 

Honey

 

Honey is high in fructose. However, there are a few facts about honey that many people arenât aware of. Even though it is quite high in fructose (around 50%), raw honey contains compounds that reduce the insulin response, so the fructose doesnât have the same impact. Studies also show that raw honey stabilizes blood sugar levels.

 

In addition, raw honey is full of antioxidants, and is also loaded with minerals, enzymes, amino acids, and vitamins. Raw honey also contains nutraceuticals, which are nutrients found to neutralize free radicals and improve the immune system. It is a wholesome food that has been eaten for centuries, before we started loading our diets with sugar.

 

Because raw honey does contain fructose, its use does need to be limited. I recommend no more than 1 tsp in a day, which equates to about 4 g of fructose. Studies:

 

Study â Rats fed honey had none of the increase in body fat that the sugar fed rats did. Honey reduced blood sugar levels and increased HDL cholesterol.

Abstract

 

Study â Comparison between fructose and honey. Fructose increased triglycerides, lowered vitamin E and were less protected from lipid peroxidation. Honey didnât raise tryglycerides, increased vitamin E and increased protection from lipid peroxidation.

Abstract

 

Study â In humans natural honey lowers plasma glucose, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and blood lipids in healthy, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic subjects. Artificial honey (dextrose and fructose) had the opposite effect.

Abstract

 

 

 

Fat canât make you fat! Weight-loss studies

 

Our bodies are not designed to eat sugar or excess grain. Science proves it. Many modern studies show significantly better weight loss with low-carb diets (Atkins in most cases), over the conventional low-fat, low-calorie advice.

 

Adiponectin Changes in Relation to the Macronutrient Composition of a Weight-Loss Diet. 2011

Efficacy and Safety of a High Protein, Low Carbohydrate Diet for Weight Loss in Severely Obese Adolescents. 2010

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low- glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. 2008

Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, mediterranean, or low-fat diet. 2008

Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and learn Diets for Change in Weight and Related Risk Factors Among Overweight Premenopausal Women. The a to z Weight Loss Study: A Randomized Trial. 2007

A low-carbohydrate diet is more effective in reducing body weight than healthy eating in both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. 2007

Short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in Type 2 diabetesâa randomized controlled trial. 2006

Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High- Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet. 2005

The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat. A Randomized Trial. 2004

Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women. 2004

A Low-Carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet versus a Low-Fat Diet To Treat Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. A Randomized, Controlled Trial. 2004

A Randomized Trial Comparing a Very Low Carbohydrate Diet and a Calorie-Restricted Low Fat Diet on Body Weight and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Healthy Women. 2003

A Low-Carbohydrate as Compared with a Low-Fat Diet in Severe Obesity. 2003

Effects of a low-carbohydrate diet on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factor in overweight adolescents. 2003

 

 

Food affects behaviour and learning

 

Sudy â Processed food impacts IQ. Study published by Journal of Epidemiol Community Health

Abstract

 

Scientific studies â food additives and colours affect childrenâs behaviour and make it difficult to concentrate. Two recent studies sponsored by the British government, each involving almost 300 children. Their results were even more startling: Artificial food dyes (in combination with a common preservative) could make even children with no known behavioural problems hyperactive and inattentive. The FDA is now investigating whether they should make changes. Abstract not available, but FDA has announced they are investigating based on the studies.

The Washington Post March 25, 2011

 

Time Magazine March 28, 2011

 

Study â fish oil makes you smarter

Abstract

 

Study â Junk food lowers IQ.

University of Bristol â press release

Edited by Niseko

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Now I have something to read on the public holiday, now question two if the research is overhwhelming?? Is there a contending hypothesis with as much if not more supporting research, why is health policy not aligned to the research on high fat.

 

Could it be:

 

There is no compelling evidence for one or the other

 

The AMA does discredit the traditional pyramid while not supporting high fat but it shows that thought is changing based on evidence:

 

https://ama.com.au/sites/default/files/documents/AMA_Position_Statement_on_Nutrition.pdf

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Â

Not sure why we can't just ban alcohol

A lot of problem may doctors like to ascribe to alcohol are actually caused by carbs.

 

Fatty liver disease is pretty much non existent if you are low carb/kerogenic.

 

 

I get that zealotry can be a turn off but in this area it is needed to reverse the wrongs of the past.

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Problem is studies on diet are impossible to conduct without inaccuracies. Too many uncontrollable variables.

 

And the people in the most powerful positions are all in CYA mode and too proud to do the Mea Culpa they should.

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Just look at what happened to John Hill and the raft of other triathletes with heart and other problems getting sick, injured and unwell while supposedly the healthiest people in society.

 

.

The man who may or may not sell gels and other Tri athletes may be adding more "substance"to there diet other than fat though , that may bring on these other problems

Cheers

Ivp

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The man who may or may not sell gels and other Tri athletes may be adding more "substance"to there diet other than fat though , that may bring on these other problems

Cheers

Ivp

Yep it's ironic that he is Aus distributor for a gel company.

 

That maltodexterin crap is more likely to block your arteries than the other 'substances'

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Yep it's ironic that he is Aus distributor for a gel company.

 

That maltodexterin crap is more likely to block your arteries than the other 'substances'

you'd be naive to think that consuming gels and sport drinks containing maltodextrin long term won't have an adverse effect on your health!

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you'd be naive to think that consuming gels and sport drinks containing maltodextrin long term won't have an adverse effect on your health!

 

Speak to your dentist, it's a dead giveaway that if something can rot your teeth without increased visits and care is going to have other effects further down the digestive line

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Butter, butter, butter -- cream and coconut oil are all saturated fats.

 

What if you went for a blood test and your cholesterols level have jumped up into the high zone including the LDL levels and your doctor says to get off that high fat diet or you could have a heart attack in a year or two.

 

Do you listen to the Doctor or think there is no evidence to support this....as "mainstream health" and government organisations are reluctant to change their minds and continue to promote the low fat diet.??

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Yep it's ironic that he is Aus distributor for a gel company.

That maltodexterin crap is more likely to block your arteries than the other 'substances'

How do those Macarons go Niseko?

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I've gone on light'n'easy to try and get down to a respectable racing weight.

 

Food isn't too bad, as long as I have plenty of tabasco sauce on hand. Although I do eat a bit extra to fuel long training sessions, normally a couple of bananas for long rides and gels for long runs.

 

It's not the cheapest but I'm time poor and it is super convenient.

 

The weight has been falling off and I'm feeling good.

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Here's another article for the High Fat camp

ABSTRACT

Background. Many successful ultra-endurance athletes have switched from a high- carbohydrate to a low-carbohydrate diet, but they have not previously been studied to determine the extent of metabolic adaptations.

Methods. Twenty elite ultra-marathoners and ironman distance triathletes performed a maximal graded exercise test and a 180 min submaximal run at 64% VO2max on a treadmill to determine metabolic responses. One group habitually consumed a traditional high- carbohydrate (HC: n = 10, %carbohydrate:protein:fat = 59:14:25) diet, and the other a low- carbohydrate (LC; n = 10, 10:19:70) diet for an average of 20 months (range 9 to 36 months).

Results. Peak fat oxidation was 2.3-fold higher in the LC group (1.54 ± 0.18 vs 0.67 ± 0.14 g/min; P = 0.000) and it occurred at a higher percentage of VO2max (70.3 ± 6.3 vs 54.9 ± 7.8%; P = 0.000). Mean fat oxidation during submaximal exercise was 59% higher in the LC group (1.21 ± 0.02 vs 0.76 ± 0.11 g/min; P = 0.000) corresponding to a greater relative contribution of fat (88 ± 2 vs 56 ± 8%; P = 0.000). Despite these marked differences in fuel use between LC and HC athletes, there were no significant differences in resting muscle glycogen and the level of depletion after 180 min of running (−64% from pre-exercise) and 120 min of recovery (−36% from pre-exercise).

Conclusion. Compared to highly trained ultra-endurance athletes consuming an HC diet, long-term keto-adaptation results in extraordinarily high rates of fat oxidation, whereas muscle glycogen utilization and repletion patterns during and after a 3 hour run are similar. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC

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Here's another article for the High Fat camp

ABSTRACT

Background. Many successful ultra-endurance athletes have switched from a high- carbohydrate to a low-carbohydrate diet, but they have not previously been studied to determine the extent of metabolic adaptations.

Methods. Twenty elite ultra-marathoners and ironman distance triathletes performed a maximal graded exercise test and a 180 min submaximal run at 64% VO2max on a treadmill to determine metabolic responses. One group habitually consumed a traditional high- carbohydrate (HC: n = 10, %carbohydrate:protein:fat = 59:14:25) diet, and the other a low- carbohydrate (LC; n = 10, 10:19:70) diet for an average of 20 months (range 9 to 36 months).

Results. Peak fat oxidation was 2.3-fold higher in the LC group (1.54 ± 0.18 vs 0.67 ± 0.14 g/min; P = 0.000) and it occurred at a higher percentage of VO2max (70.3 ± 6.3 vs 54.9 ± 7.8%; P = 0.000). Mean fat oxidation during submaximal exercise was 59% higher in the LC group (1.21 ± 0.02 vs 0.76 ± 0.11 g/min; P = 0.000) corresponding to a greater relative contribution of fat (88 ± 2 vs 56 ± 8%; P = 0.000). Despite these marked differences in fuel use between LC and HC athletes, there were no significant differences in resting muscle glycogen and the level of depletion after 180 min of running (−64% from pre-exercise) and 120 min of recovery (−36% from pre-exercise).

Conclusion. Compared to highly trained ultra-endurance athletes consuming an HC diet, long-term keto-adaptation results in extraordinarily high rates of fat oxidation, whereas muscle glycogen utilization and repletion patterns during and after a 3 hour run are similar. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC

Interesting

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Give me a break.

 

You're constantly going on about people who don't follow your regime. Telling people they dont need to wear a wetsuit cause you and your gf dont. Please tell me again how good she swam i can't recall from the 30 or so times you have already spewed it onto the site.

 

Then you make a comment basically saying gee not sure why you guys bother with any of this when I didnt need to.

 

Ok so LZ has no need for a wetsuit, a coach or any diet plan. Awesome well done champ.

 

I am in no way saying I earnt anything more than you but you're constantly making remarks talking down on people who do utilise other things.

 

I have no doubt you worked fkn hard to achieve you're spot, everyone does in different ways. The end result is what matters and noone gives a shit if you can do it without a wetsuit coach or diet plan.

 

Telling people who do use a coach or a "different" diet that "gee i didnt need that", is that arrogant?

 

1) Very proud of her. But I forgot the internet is supposed to be full off haters.

2) Im an average swimmer so for me, wetsuits for competing, tri suit for enjoyment. I've always worn a wetsuit when needed: as stated here many times when I wear a wetsuit its a sleeveless for comfort over speed. I think I swam 36 minutes in Cairns, in a tri suit. Below average one would think.

3) Perspective is all. Just pointing out that more than one way to get there.

 

If I wanted to be the absolute best I could be, without doubt I probably should get a coach, have a good look at my diet, do core strength, etc etc. However if you look at what at the performances of the elite athletes my age and the results I need to achieve my goal theres a big gap. I pick the 80% of things needed that I enjoy. So on the country, rather than being arrogant, I'm just not deluding myself.

Edited by lzbones

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Â

1) Very proud of her. But I forgot the internet is supposed to be full off haters.

2) Â Im an average swimmer so for me, wetsuits for competing, tri suit for enjoyment. I've always worn a wetsuit when needed: as stated here many times when I wear a wetsuit its a sleeveless for comfort over speed. I think I swam 36 minutes in Cairns, in a tri suit. Below average one would think.

3) Perspective is all. Just pointing out that more than one way to get there.Â

Â

If I wanted to be the absolute best I could be, without doubt I probably should get a coach, have a good look at my diet, do core strength, etc etc. However if you look at what at the performances of the elite athletes my age and the results I need to achieve my goal theres a big gap. I pick the 80% of things needed that I enjoy. So on the country, rather than being arrogant, I'm just not deluding myself.Â

Check your messages lzbones

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Two questions for the hflc crew.

1a. Do you transition to carbs in the week or two leading up to the race to allow for sugar on the day?

1b. If yes how do you practice race day nutrition in the lead up.

2. How does beer fit into your diet?

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Two questions for the hflc crew.

1a. Do you transition to carbs in the week or two leading up to the race to allow for sugar on the day?

1b. If yes how do you practice race day nutrition in the lead up.

2. How does beer fit into your diet?

I'm far from an expert on the topic but I'll answer as to what I did:

1. Carbs didn't really play a part in my diet until I reached high volumes of training in my program and then I would introduce structured carbs on the night before long sessions only.

2. Training I would generally try and train on water only to utilise fat stores but I did have 3 key long sessions leading into port where I practiced my race day nutrition. I would generally carry a gel or 2 on long runs and rides but only use them if I needed them.

3. Beer happened post race and hasn't stopped since. It now forms the majority of my nutritional intake.

 

 

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I like all of those answers. So race day you just #carbup as normal? Normal is pretty subjective I spose.

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Pretty well...I had a nutritional race day plan prior to taking on HFLC which seemed to work for me so I just made sure it sat well with me in a few sessions prior to race day. I'm lucky in that not much affects my gut but I could see how others could get caught out with such plan. I'm sure there are better ways to approach it but I'm not that good or serious and it's good enough for me.

 

 

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Two questions for the hflc crew.

1a. Do you transition to carbs in the week or two leading up to the race to allow for sugar on the day? I use the minimal effective dose of carbs in training to get me through, I don't transition to carbs leading up I just keep everything the same

1b. If yes how do you practice race day nutrition in the lead up.

I use carbs in the training and racing just find I don't need or use as much as I used to

2. How does beer fit into your diet?

We all have a weakness

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Sorry to revive an old thread but it's better than starting a new one......

 

I'm interested in HFLC and have been making changes over the last few weeks but I'm not sure if I'm eating enough fat or if I'm eating too much protein. My FitnessPal seems a little inconsistent when I punch my daily eating into it.

 

Can some of the experienced HFLC eaters critique my standard eating plan?

 

Breakfast Options:

2 or 3 x Egg Muffins, whisked eggs with some milk add bacon pieces, a few spinach leaves, a little cheese and some chia seeds. I cook a batch up every weekend and then heat them in the microwave - quick n easy.

 

Half an avocado, with a poached egg placed in the hole where the avo seed was, a couple of rashers of cooked bacon, grated cheese - into the oven for 15mins - delicious.

 

Lunch:

I usually have a salad consisting of a big handful of spinach leaves, a few roasted pepper pieces, a few cherry tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, a small handful of pine nuts and avocado chunks. Over this I pour about 30mL of olive oil as a dressing. I would then have whatever last nights meat was with this salad, usually chicken breast, lamb, steak or salmon.

This is my usual work lunch.

 

Dinner:

Usually the same as lunch or I might swap the salad for veges of broccoli, cauliflower etc.

On a lazy night I might just have steak and eggs.

 

I've cut out the soft drinks and the beer, occasionally have a red wine. No sugar in my tea. Snacks are pretty minimal at the moment as I usually feel satisfied but if I do it's a few spoonfuls of almond butter or some Greek yogurt with blueberries.

 

I would appreciate feedback on this menu and whether it adheres to HFLC? I would like to hit it hard for a few months (ideally less than 30g of carbs) to see where it leads.

I'd also appreciate any other HFLC meal ideas to give me some more ideas?

 

Thanks in advance.

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Sorry to revive an old thread but it's better than starting a new one......

 

I'm interested in HFLC and have been making changes over the last few weeks but I'm not sure if I'm eating enough fat or if I'm eating too much protein. My FitnessPal seems a little inconsistent when I punch my daily eating into it.

 

Can some of the experienced HFLC eaters critique my standard eating plan?

 

Breakfast Options:

2 or 3 x Egg Muffins, whisked eggs with some milk add bacon pieces, a few spinach leaves, a little cheese and some chia seeds. I cook a batch up every weekend and then heat them in the microwave - quick n easy.

 

Half an avocado, with a poached egg placed in the hole where the avo seed was, a couple of rashers of cooked bacon, grated cheese - into the oven for 15mins - delicious.

 

Lunch:

I usually have a salad consisting of a big handful of spinach leaves, a few roasted pepper pieces, a few cherry tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, a small handful of pine nuts and avocado chunks. Over this I pour about 30mL of olive oil as a dressing. I would then have whatever last nights meat was with this salad, usually chicken breast, lamb, steak or salmon.

This is my usual work lunch.

 

Dinner:

Usually the same as lunch or I might swap the salad for veges of broccoli, cauliflower etc.

On a lazy night I might just have steak and eggs.

 

I've cut out the soft drinks and the beer, occasionally have a red wine. No sugar in my tea. Snacks are pretty minimal at the moment as I usually feel satisfied but if I do it's a few spoonfuls of almond butter or some Greek yogurt with blueberries.

 

I would appreciate feedback on this menu and whether it adheres to HFLC? I would like to hit it hard for a few months (ideally less than 30g of carbs) to see where it leads.

I'd also appreciate any other HFLC meal ideas to give me some more ideas?

 

Thanks in advance.

I don't see a lot wrong with that, generally it depends on what you are trying to achieve from diet. If it's weight loss I would initially try and reduce the dairy intake as much as possible. Ideally the lunch should be your smallest meal due to the fact the breakfast would generally carry you through.

 

For me I normally only have either a couple cans of tuna or some boiled eggs and maybe a handful of cheese cubes if I really feel like it. If I feel like a snack it's only a handful of mixed nuts mid morning and arvo and plenty of water which i put lemon juice in.

 

The key is to keep it simple as over complicating it generally leads to loss of enthusiasm and next thing you will be grabbing the coco pops just because it's an easy option.

 

Regarding how much fat to take in I cook mostly in butter mainly because I prefer the taste over olive or coconut oil. And when I say I cook in it, basically the food is swimming in it.

 

To be honest though I only see results from this way of eating if I'm training a minimum of 10-12hrs a week and it must be consistent. I'm off the tools these days so the more active I can be outside of work hours the better.

 

 

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From some reviews I have heard, check out "what the fat" www.whatthefat.com

 

The books are by a NZ dietition and Professor looking at LCHF on sports performance and eating plans.

I had a look at it in a bookstore and looked easy to read.

 

I just eat what my wife cooks so no my eating style, but potentially some good quality information

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I don't see a lot wrong with that, generally it depends on what you are trying to achieve from diet. If it's weight loss I would initially try and reduce the dairy intake as much as possible. Ideally the lunch should be your smallest meal due to the fact the breakfast would generally carry you through.

 

For me I normally only have either a couple cans of tuna or some boiled eggs and maybe a handful of cheese cubes if I really feel like it. If I feel like a snack it's only a handful of mixed nuts mid morning and arvo and plenty of water which i put lemon juice in.

 

The key is to keep it simple as over complicating it generally leads to loss of enthusiasm and next thing you will be grabbing the coco pops just because it's an easy option.

 

Regarding how much fat to take in I cook mostly in butter mainly because I prefer the taste over olive or coconut oil. And when I say I cook in it, basically the food is swimming in it.

 

To be honest though I only see results from this way of eating if I'm training a minimum of 10-12hrs a week and it must be consistent. I'm off the tools these days so the more active I can be outside of work hours the better.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Agree with this. I try and have breakfast so it could almost sustain me all day (depending on training loads). Breakfast is 3 eggs scrambled in cream and butter (30g), bacon/chrorizo, half an avocado, dash of cream in my coffee. If I am not training and only doing easy swim day/easy commute home this will get me through to dinner with only another long black with cream at 3ish.

 

I find that salad just doesnt do it for me so have veges instead. brocolli or cauliflower, coles has prepacked microwave bags that I find easy at work. Pour some oil/butter or melt some cheese on top and eat with some meat (but meat should probably be smaller than you think..)

 

I also cannot take bacon and eggs all the time so have started making chia, berry, nut and coconut milk porridge which are quite nice as a change (plus a good dose of fibre)

 

RBR seems to have it sorted in terms of aiding performance so he may have ideas..

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Im also very interested in the HFLC way of eating but I dont want to lose weight & I cant stand bacon. Is it all over for me before I start?

 

Edit to say this is a genuine question, it seems most refer to HFLC as a way to lose weight. Thanks all

Edited by surfer101

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Im also very interested in the HFLC way of eating but I dont want to lose weight & I cant stand bacon. Is it all over for me before I start?

 

Edit to say this is a genuine question, it seems most refer to HFLC as a way to lose weight. Thanks all

It doesn't have to be a way to lose weight if you don't have weight to lose. Once I get to the "weight I want to be at" it will for me mean a way to stay at that weight, and keep my energy levels constant, rather than the up & down fluctuations I get with sugar.

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Im also very interested in the HFLC way of eating but I dont want to lose weight & I cant stand bacon. Is it all over for me before I start?

 

Edit to say this is a genuine question, it seems most refer to HFLC as a way to lose weight. Thanks all

4 week ban. Doesn't like bacon.

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I don't see a lot wrong with that, generally it depends on what you are trying to achieve from diet. If it's weight loss I would initially try and reduce the dairy intake as much as possible. Ideally the lunch should be your smallest meal due to the fact the breakfast would generally carry you through.

For me I normally only have either a couple cans of tuna or some boiled eggs and maybe a handful of cheese cubes if I really feel like it. If I feel like a snack it's only a handful of mixed nuts mid morning and arvo and plenty of water which i put lemon juice in.

The key is to keep it simple as over complicating it generally leads to loss of enthusiasm and next thing you will be grabbing the coco pops just because it's an easy option.

Regarding how much fat to take in I cook mostly in butter mainly because I prefer the taste over olive or coconut oil. And when I say I cook in it, basically the food is swimming in it.

To be honest though I only see results from this way of eating if I'm training a minimum of 10-12hrs a week and it must be consistent. I'm off the tools these days so the more active I can be outside of work hours the better.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Im not training that much at the moment, probably around 5-6 hours per week.

I definitely want to lose some weight, probably about 8kg above where I want to be at the moment. I struggle to find the time to have a big breakfast cook-up as I'm in the car for work by 05:30am, which is why I've gone to having those pre-made egg muffins which I can even eat in the car if I'm running late.

 

I need to slowly up the training hours it would seem but I'd like to see how much diet alone can shift some weight. Thanks heaps for the feedback.

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Check out "Natural Nutritionist " website - Steph Lowe - she has recipes on there and podcast etc to listen to her.

 

I've had 2 Skype consultations with her -- she is very good

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Do those pre made muffins included a bread muffin?

 

Nah, not mine mate. Just eggs and a bit of milk whisked up with whatever fillings you want (I use bacon or pork sausage with some spinach leaves, a little cheese and some chia seeds). Pour into a muffin tray and bake at 180 for 25mins.

 

Easy as - takes less than an hour all up to make and my breakfast is sorted for the week.

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Check out "Natural Nutritionist " website - Steph Lowe - she has recipes on there and podcast etc to listen to her.

 

I've had 2 Skype consultations with her -- she is very good

 

Thanks for that. I checked out the website, heaps of good info and resources there.

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dietdoctor.com low carb section is great .easy to read and a lot of recipes

 

if you like pizza,bread and pancakes that are low carb check out aussie company the protien bread Co . ive got there pizza base mix a few times .very filling

Edited by thecouch

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