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Dropper seat post- anyone used one

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So I'm on a XC dually which I set up with quite a long stem and bars lower than saddle for normal riding position (seat height similar to road position) which is efficient for firetrail and AR stuff and less technical riding.

 

Doing some harder rockier stuff with drop offs and steep descents recently and I can't get back over the rear wheel cos the saddle is in the way and feel like I'm always on the verge of going over the bars. Have been watching some Youtube vids with dropper posts which got me wondering, how far do people drop their saddle from a normal XC position to ride technical descents, whether with a dropper post or otherwise.

 

I have a QR seat post clamp and dropped my saddle for what turned out to be a longish but pretty cruisey descent with some berms and didn't really sit down, which I found trashed the legs, is there a sweet spot where you can still use the saddle but it's out of the way enough?

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I have been riding with a dropper for about 6 months on a XC 29er. I would have to be one of the innovations to MTB for a long time.

Couple of key reasons; allows better downhill control/comfort with being able to get future back and keep the weight on the rear wheel, for uphill you can have your seat right up to optimise power.

If you are riding a new trail it just lets you ride to the best you can and not in a compromise position.

It will take about 5 rides to get used to it. Just remembering to drop the post as you start to descend or roll over

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I manually drop mine about 20mm for Mt Keira when I get to the top.

 

I am sure someone will beat me to it, but I will be sporting a dropper in two weeks time so can share my experiences then.

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I have been riding with a dropper for about 6 months on a XC 29er. I would have to be one of the innovations to MTB for a long time.

Couple of key reasons; allows better downhill control/comfort with being able to get future back and keep the weight on the rear wheel, for uphill you can have your seat right up to optimise power.

If you are riding a new trail it just lets you ride to the best you can and not in a compromise position.

It will take about 5 rides to get used to it. Just remembering to drop the post as you start to descend or roll over

 

Thanks R-dog. How far do you drop it to get the benefit on descents?

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My dropper has 75mm travel. Was my sons but he uppgraded to 100mm and wants 125mm for steeper decents on 140mm travel bike.

I tend to have the seat right up; think road position, for climbs, then drop down depending on what i'm riding, single track flat maybe 2cm, following down hill 4cm, steep max. Means I don't have to stop to adjust height. just tune it as I ride.

 

I have a hydraulic but with Cable actuation, which is what was recommended as easy to set-up. Hydraulic actuation can be a pain if you internal route our want to change cable length. Not sure of the brand as it was OEM on a Norco. My sons is a Giant branded one, with the same set-up. He runs his cable internally in the frame, mine is external

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i have a rock shox stealth on my xc bike, drops by 125mm, and makes a massive difference, and with the push of a button, it's back up and ready to climb again, best money i have spent on a bike in a long time, and for 200gram weight penalty. I look at it like this, if im worried about 200 grams, then i can either lose weight, carry 200 mls less water or take a dump before i ride, my bike is a 4 inch travel dually, but short legs means i cant get back over the seat for decents,

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Well you learn something every day - I had to google what a dropper seat post was but they look interesting

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Been experimenting with manually dropping seat at the start of known descents I've been riding for a while. Holy crap it is easier without the saddle giving me a prostate exam, can really throw the bike forward, backwards and sideways much easier. Even climbing rooty,rocky ascents was more fun. Quads burn from not sitting down was the only side effect. I guess you need to find the sweet spot where you can still sit for short periods on descents but drop off shit easier.

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Parky, If you are looking into them try and find one that allows you to pre set the heights. I think Thomson do one where you can have it set to 3 different set heights. I say this because you want to just hit the dropper and know it will settle where you want it. You don't want to be fluffing around with the lever and sitting on the saddle to get it to go down again to then have to stand up and bring it back up to have another stab at a mid height on the way down your favourite trail.

 

3 heights:

1. Full down for the really knarly stuff. Double diamond etc. Hammerhead at Stromlo

2. Mid height for the techy stuff but where you may still want some saddle support. (think Pork Barrel or the new enduro section in Stromlo)

3. Full up for pedalling.

Edited by thekeeper
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Yes a couple of guys I ride wit that are into more of the free ride technical stuff all swear by their dropper posts. Never thought I needed one but they do make a difference.

 

Mate had a few experiences that he was not impressed with the quality of the product will attempt to find out what they were again.

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I am 5 rides in with mine, very handy with techy descents. Mine has only up/down, so as the keeper says, it would be better with a few incremental options. Down on mine is too far to use for anything seated. It purely gets it outta the way. I rode local stuff today I hadn't got anywhere near before. Partly bike, partly getting that saddle out of the road.

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