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Diamonds

So I paid for a lesson

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While in Bright, paid for an hour lesson (got 80mins in fact) for the young bloke and I. Totally worth it.

 

Most of my skills are self taught and I thought I was okay but learnt a ton this morning.

 

Will give a bit of detail later. Off to ride.

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I did the same thing a few weeks ago Diamonds. We (MR CC + me) had 2 hours and it was really, really good. He even did things like showing me the appropriate etiquette when out on a trail. I am a true beginner and it has been the best money I have spent so far! :)

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So, bearing in mind my 10.5 year old was the main beneficiary of the lesson, we covered (in order);

* Ready (or attack) position

* Braking and weight shift

* Dropping in or off objects

* Climbing position with focus on wrist position, weight and posture

* Wheelie technique and a practice drill to be competent to start dropping off larger ledges or objects

 

The attack position with a focus on trying to have zero weight on the arms was a massive difference, allowing the bike to move wherever it needed to underneath you.

 

The braking technique of slowly shifting off the rear of the saddle as you squeezed was another useful pickup.

 

Lastly, the biggest pickup was moving my chest forward and down almost onto the stem before a drop off (instead of shifting weight behind saddle in anticipation) was a game changer. Instead of the bike dragging me down over the drop and sometimes over the bars, my arms have massive travel to let the bike fall under me and I just drop straight onto it. 1000% improvement.

Edited by Diamonds
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Sounds awesome, looking for something similar to this for my young bloke.

 

He is super keen so want to keep encouraging him.

 

Might start another thread to get some advice from you mate.

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Sounds awesome, looking for something similar to this for my young bloke.Â

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He is super keen so want to keep encouraging him.Â

Â

Might start another thread to get some advice from you mate.Â

Rox, I Just cold called the bloke from a flyer on the Velo Cafe wall down here. I was hoping he was running holiday clinics but school has gone back here. $100 for an hour was his rate and happy for both of us at once.

 

He checked our tyre pressure and forks then started with basic position on the bike. Then he checked Sam's "range of motion" on the bike by having him shift forward and back as far as he can, then lay it over each way, all whilst rolling.

 

We then did a heap of small rollers with the idea that his head stayed the same and the bike moved up and down under him with the arms hinging at the elbows. The point being his forks have 100mm travel but his arms about 400mm. He demonstrated riding with two fingers over them to show the amount of pressure on the bars needed to allow the bike to work under you. Easy to pick up and makes a massive difference. The tree roots and rocks I otherwise bounce off, I was now floating over without the speed loss. It then leads into "pumping" the bike more easily down the other side of the undulations or off berms.

 

Anyway, best hundred I've spent in ages.

 

I have also sent you a PM.

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Roxii, hook him up for a tranny training day - reckon you'd get a decent bunch. A bit like what Coach@ did for swimming a couple of years ago at Engadine Pool.

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We then did a heap of small rollers with the idea that his head stayed the same and the bike moved up and down under him with the arms hinging at the elbows. The point being his forks have 100mm travel but his arms about 400mm. He demonstrated riding with two fingers over them to show the amount of pressure on the bars needed to allow the bike to work under you. Easy to pick up and makes a massive difference. The tree roots and rocks I otherwise bounce off, I was now floating over without the speed loss. It then leads into "pumping" the bike more easily down the other side of the undulations or off berms.

 

 

Thanks heaps for sharing this Diamonds!!

 

Was out on the trails at Daisy Hill yesterday with my teenage daughter, and tried this technique along the singletrack. Made a HUGE difference, and I ended up feeling much more relaxed as I floated through instead of bouncing around the obstacles.

 

Cheers!! :-)

Abby

Edited by Abby

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No worries.

 

Actually on this topic, there was about a 400m stretch y'day in Xterra of whoopdie-do thingos and the roadie/tri folk (I am guessing) were struggling massively. If you went fast you just plowed your bike into the next upslope. I used the technique while also pumping the downsides of the small mounds and picked up about 7 spots without turning a pedal in that stretch.

Edited by Diamonds

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Best thing I've done to. If you are in Brisbane, Roadie Rob is awesome. No idea why his name is that, he is a full time mountain bike instructor.

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Late to the party, but I did a session today with Ben from http://www.forbesmtbcourses.com

Just me, 1 on 1 for 2 hours after work, at Gap Creek Reserve

Being a total n00b, we started with the basics:

Track stand attempts - this surprised me, but made sense when he explained it just gives you time to assess things if you need it.

He noticed my grip and we went and moved my brake levers in a bit from the end of my bars, trying to get me used to 1 finger braking.

Flat pedals/attack stance.

Front/rear wheel lifts, then some obstacles - 1 coppers log/2 coppers logs/six coppers logs in a stack kind of thing.

Cornering - including moving from flat to outside leg down and back to flat - that was much longer to get hold of than I'd like to admit.

Then hit a couple of trails in the second hour, some wayyy more technical stuff than I've been on so far. (But still only Green/Blue rated)

 

The difference between me stopping dead on seeing some of the obstacles on the first trail and not blinking about something similar 20 minutes later was pretty stark.

I found the whole session just so worthwhile.

Ben was pretty easy going, no stress felt at all.

He explained everything so I could understand it.

I have to practice, then I will do a second session with him next month.

I would recommend him to anyone in Brissie.

 

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Learning to track stand is one of the best skills you can have on a mountain bike. Well worth the hours it takes to perfect!

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This is him going for a downhill Strava KOM. (The music sucks)

I assume this stuff will be in lesson 2 :scooter:

 

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