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Tyres, Tubeless ready, which ones.

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No they guys at the shop (ABC Bikes) reckon its a poor design, using alloy nipples. They are the Giant wheels. The nipples are literally failing, just popping apart with the "flange" coming away. They are just respoking the wheels with brass nipples (no charge).

Oh, I thought you had all the nipples replaced and the new ones were failing.

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If travelling with tubeless. Can you depend on a conventional pump to pump them up?

 

How about high pressure pumps in Servo's? Is their any adaptor for that?

Depends on the rim/tyre combo. A small hand pump is no chance, a track pump will work in a lot of cases but not sure how they'll go with a non tubeless rim that has been converted. I have read of people having problems using the pre-set service station pumps as they don't give the volume needed. If it's the old method of a hose straight from the compressor it should work. Best method if you travel is to use a Co2 canister and some soapy water. Delivers a lot of volume in a short burst!

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Oh, I thought you had all the nipples replaced and the new ones were failing.

 

They just did the front first to see if it would work before throwing money at all the tubeless guff. Seems to be holding fine on the front, so it was coming time to do the rear, but the weekends failure just expedited the process.

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On 20/05/2016 at 1:19 PM, Chookman said:
On 20/05/2016 at 0:00 PM, Dromana said:

90

30 is probably at the lower limit running tubes at 90kg. Use a good digital gauge if you aren't already. I've had 2 digital gauges which read 2-3 psi lower than my 2 track pumps... (1 is a top end pump). 3psi can make a lot of difference with mtb tyres. For all-round fun and handling, stick a 2.35 chunky tyre (Nobby Nic etc) up front and 2.25 faster rolling tyre the back. Run them tubeless at 25-28 as a starting point.

Coming back to this thread for some tyre advice from blokes like Chook and Slowy

Just did a parts swap onto a new 26" Hardtail frame. Need to replace the old LarsenTT tyres as they are seeping sealant in more places than not. Riding Heathcote, RNP, Mill Creek. Looking at doing 50k Kowalski.

Looking on MTB Direct I'm thinking Maxxis Ikon rear 2.25 and looked for Ardent Race but seems only the Ardent is available, looking to use this on front, available 2.25 or 2.4, should I go for 2.4.

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4 hours ago, Parkside said:

 

Looking on MTB Direct I'm thinking Maxxis Ikon rear 2.25 and looked for Ardent Race but seems only the Ardent is available, looking to use this on front, available 2.25 or 2.4, should I go for 2.4.

Parky, wider on the front like 2.4 allows for better control and is often preferred....

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34 minutes ago, Shrek said:

Parky, wider on the front like 2.4 allows for better control and is often preferred....

Thanks mate, yeah just wasn't sure if 2.4 was too wide, more control would be very good!!

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On ‎20‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 8:43 AM, Parkside said:

Coming back to this thread for some tyre advice from blokes like Chook and Slowy

Just did a parts swap onto a new 26" Hardtail frame. Need to replace the old LarsenTT tyres as they are seeping sealant in more places than not. Riding Heathcote, RNP, Mill Creek. Looking at doing 50k Kowalski.

Looking on MTB Direct I'm thinking Maxxis Ikon rear 2.25 and looked for Ardent Race but seems only the Ardent is available, looking to use this on front, available 2.25 or 2.4, should I go for 2.4.

Personally I wouldn't find an ardent race up front very confidence inspiring on a track like Menai. A standard Ardent in 2.4 or a 2.35 Nobby Nic up front would be a better choice IMO. Menai is perfectly rideable with an Ardent race but when the track is bone dry (as it is now) and you try to push that little bit extra, you'll end up having a few 'oh f*ck' moments on some of the tight corners.

Edited by Chookman

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My son converted my Niner RIP to tubeless last week as his school holiday project

It is a 29er, i weigh 90kg and will be riding something like Manly Dam, North St Ives so rocky bits

What pressure should i run the tires at

cheers

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4 hours ago, rory-dognz said:

My son converted my Niner RIP to tubeless last week as his school holiday project

It is a 29er, i weigh 90kg and will be riding something like Manly Dam, North St Ives so rocky bits

What pressure should i run the tires at

cheers

What width tyres? I'm 80kg and run 24-25 rear and 22-22 front. That's on a HT with a 32x120 fork. I rarely get rim strike when riding Menai. Could probaby go lower on my duallie. Maybe start at 28 and 26 and see how it feels. If you start striking rims or it feels squirmish, up the pressure slightly. If it feels skittish, try dropping it a touvh till you find a happy medium.

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On 7/21/2017 at 0:07 PM, Chookman said:

Personally I wouldn't find an ardent race up front very confidence inspiring on a track like Menai. A standard Ardent in 2.4 or a 2.35 Nobby Nic up front would be a better choice IMO. Menai is perfectly rideable with an Ardent race but when the track is bone dry (as it is now) and you try to push that little bit extra, you'll end up having a few 'oh f*ck' moments on some of the tight corners.

Thanks again.

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Ironic that this thread pops up again - my wife arrives back in the country tomorrow with 6 rolls of Gorilla tape - I haven't been able to find it locally since Masters Hardware went belly up.

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18 hours ago, Parkside said:

2.35 Nic and 2.25 Ralph on their way

Nice choice. Ralphs and Rocket Rons are great rear tyres although they wear pretty quickly. I'm going through a Ron every 3-4 months or so. I imagine it's a problem with any faster rolling tyre as they only have 6-8mm of knob height and once they get down to 2-3mm they slide around a bit more.

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Im running 2.35 Nic on the front and 2.20 Maxxis Icon on the back. I get great tread life out of the Nic. Switched to the Icon on the back as I had some puncture issues with the Ralphs, may have just been bad luck. Maxxis are much cheaper.

Edited by Blacky

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On 23/07/2017 at 4:41 PM, Chookman said:

Nice choice. Ralphs and Rocket Rons are great rear tyres although they wear pretty quickly. I'm going through a Ron every 3-4 months or so. I imagine it's a problem with any faster rolling tyre as they only have 6-8mm of knob height and once they get down to 2-3mm they slide around a bit more.

Finally got around to getting these on and riding around Engadine/East Heathcote. On a HT, had pressures 31 up front, 29 rear. Will probably drop them a PSI each next time and see how that goes. I'm sitting around 94kg at the moment. Back wheel felt a little harsh, sure I can get away with a little less. Felt a lot more secure cornering than the 2.2 bald Larsen TT's I was running.

 

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13 hours ago, Parkside said:

Finally got around to getting these on and riding around Engadine/East Heathcote. On a HT, had pressures 31 up front, 29 rear. Will probably drop them a PSI each next time and see how that goes. I'm sitting around 94kg at the moment. Back wheel felt a little harsh, sure I can get away with a little less. Felt a lot more secure cornering than the 2.2 bald Larsen TT's I was running.

 

Parky, why more pressure up front? I'd be inclined to try 28 rear and 25 up front and see how that goes.

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36 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Hmmm, I might be running way too much pressure at about 40psi & 66kg (normal tubed mtb tyres), which is why I keep falling off!

At 66kg and 40psi you're not going to have a lot of rubber contacting the ground. I imagine you'd be bouncing all over the place?

Even with tubes you coul comfortably drop down to mid 20s.

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38 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

Hmmm, I might be running way too much pressure at about 40psi & 66kg (normal tubed mtb tyres), which is why I keep falling off!

On tubes at 88kg for cross country i run 28 front 30 rear These are on a 29er running approx 2.2 wide. I could go lower i think

 

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On 9/20/2017 at 8:38 AM, Chookman said:

Parky, why more pressure up front? I'd be inclined to try 28 rear and 25 up front and see how that goes.

typo, reverse them.

I used Stans' formula:  weight (lbs)/7   add 1 for rear, subtract 1 for front PSI

Edited by Parkside

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On 9/20/2017 at 12:49 PM, Chookman said:

At 66kg and 40psi you're not going to have a lot of rubber contacting the ground. I imagine you'd be bouncing all over the place?

Even with tubes you coul comfortably drop down to mid 20s.

 

On 9/20/2017 at 12:50 PM, rory-dognz said:

On tubes at 88kg for cross country i run 28 front 30 rear These are on a 29er running approx 2.2 wide. I could go lower i think

 

Thanks guys, took them down to maybe 25psi-ish, much more controllable and comfortable on the single track.  Did a 50sec PB around my course and that was with a bit of a slip and having to re-clip in, and PBs on nearly all of the Strava segments at lunch.  Tougher on the bitumen riding uphill home though.

One trick I've discovered for faster cornering is to look through the corner more, less directly down where your front wheel is.  Seems to give you a better feel for the corner.

 

GiantTalon.jpg

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17 minutes ago, ComfortablyNumb said:

 

 

One trick I've discovered for faster cornering is to look through the corner more, less directly down where your front wheel is.  Seems to give you a better feel for the corner.

 

GiantTalon.jpg

That is the key to cycling, look to where you want to go and not your front wheel, I need to remember this more myself.

I rode on Sunday with 26/25 (back/front) which was down from 30/28 and it felt slightly better, so slipping out so will try that again. 

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