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roxii

Tyres, Tubeless ready, which ones.

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Hey kids, I had my bike booked in to get tubelessed but stuff happened and it didnt happen.

 

Anyway I'm gunna have a go myself.

 

Currently running Maxxis Crossmark 27.5 x 2.1 on Giant PXC-2 rims.

 

Happy to buy new/ better tyres as well if the ones I have aren't tubeless compatible.

 

So what is the good rubber (links to good places to buy would be appreciated)

 

 

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After this mornings walk from the new skatepark back to Cronulla train station.....can you convert my roadie whilst your at it.... :sly::shy::shock:

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After this mornings walk from the new skatepark back to Cronulla train station.....can you convert my roadie whilst your at it.... :sly::shy::shock:

 

Should have called mate, wouldnt be the first rescue Ive done out there.

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note to self....check the spares bag on the odd occasion....when the hell did the tyre levers get taken out and not put back in....(probably used for home maintenance at some stage ....)

 

and nope the tyre wasn't coming off without a lever....and Trace was out doing her training...so decent walk it was....

 

oh well....lesson learnt... :taz:

 

back on topic....crossmarks are pretty good, think from memory I have an Aspen on the front of the good bike...

Edited by Shrek

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yeah I believe so....however folk like Slowman have more expertise on this topic...so he would probably able to share more wisdom.....

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Hey Roxii,

 

if you like the Crossmark (and the II version looks like it could be better) then you have what you need.

 

I managed to get my tyres up first time with just a track pump but I bought a 2hp air compressor from Supercheap Auto for around $150 and that saved some perspiration and angst. Tubeless at times seems like an art more than a science :lol: so an air compressor is handy at times.

 

I prefer the Schwalbe Racing Ralph Evos just because I like the way they perform though the Evo (530g for 29ers!) which is like the Maxxis Exception mean thin sidewalls which means a sidewall nick from a rock can bugger the tyre and make it useless for further tubeless use sometimes. I have managed to successfully sleeve a sidewall nick once with an internal canvas patch but it is messy. You have to get all the gunk out and dry the area for there to be any chance of adhesion. Usually easier to just put a new one on and move the tyre onto a bike for family duties or commuting with a tube.

 

The weight of those ones at 685g tells me the sidewalls should be quite sturdy. So you should have zero issues unless you get unlucky. I think I went for 5 years before I got my first flat on a tubeless converted tyre. Not bad, though when they do occur they are a royal pain (you should still carry a spare tube) but they are so rare especially if you make sure you top up the sealant every 3 months or so (though I'd regularly go for 6). The sealant will dry up over time. Interesting to have a look inside after a year or so, you will find all these little balls of latex that have formed around the small holes in the tyre.

 

Let me know how those new Crossmark II's go. I didn't mind them the grip wasn't bad and their rolling speed was good but what used to annoy me was their tendency to spray dirt and mud everywhere. The RRs did have slightly better grip (especially in the wet) but are more expensive.

 

I have some a couple of rims (the Stans Crest and Sun Ringle Blackflag both use Stans patented beadless rim technology) that only need the tape but most ordinary rims you are home and hosed with the Stans conversion kit. Just be careful with the rimstrips where they meet the valve base, get too rough and you can separate the rubber from the base of the valve. It's a bugger to find too. I've had 2 fail that way after they got older (5yrs +) but I think once you're aware and take care it helps prevent it.

 

Generally Stans conversion kit works very well and I keep coming back to it when my experiments with just tape and a tubeless valve fail. Some of them worked for ages too and then just failed and I couldn't find the problem so I'd stick in a stans rimstrip and solve the issue or if it was my wife's or one of the kids just use a tube... but don't tell them (mainly because they wouldn't understand anyway).

 

Good luck and without doubt you will notice a better feel because you can run a lower pressure 28psi front and 30psi for the rear for me.

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I love mine now they finally stay up. I have Maxxis tyres but will have to check which ones when I get home. 2.2's with the thick sidewalls for tubeless. They are a fair bit more rubber. On factory Giant 29er rims with a Stans kit.

 

A have winced a few times after hearing and feeling the rim bottom out on something, expecting a certain flat, only to soldier on no probs.

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Racing Ralph's are the go

 

Slowman pretty much covered everything

 

Make sure you keep the sealant topped up

It does dissapear so a top up every 3-4 months is needed

Cheers

Ivp

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Learnt a lesson today. Was running too low a pressure and rolled the tyre and it dropped off the bead. What a bunfight. Trying to get enough PSI in with a shitty 4 inch handpump while losing air and sealant out of the unsealed bead. Got there eventually but soured my day somewhat.

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I was toying with the idea of converting the young bloke's fat bike to tubeless (26x4").

 

Based on some youtube videos it looks fairly straightforward but they all seem to refer to 'gorilla' tape which looks to be 4" wide gaffer tape. Do I need to source this wide tape or can I just layer up some 50mm gaffer and it will work?

 

Also, what's the go with the sealant? We were at a bike shop this morning and saw a pack of the Stan's which looked quite big (maybe 400-500ml). Then there were some small bottles (I'd guess 100ml or so). How much of this do you need?

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The little ones will be for the ~3 monthly top-up Id' guess. When the shop did my 29er they used most of a big bottle, with the dreggs to be used 3-4 months in as the sealant dries up or leaks or is used up filling knicks etc.

 

You'd use plenty in a fattie I'd reckon, but they look pretty hard to pinch flat. IP will know the go as the forum fattie freak.

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I was toying with the idea of converting the young bloke's fat bike to tubeless (26x4").

 

Based on some youtube videos it looks fairly straightforward but they all seem to refer to 'gorilla' tape which looks to be 4" wide gaffer tape. Do I need to source this wide tape or can I just layer up some 50mm gaffer and it will work?

 

Also, what's the go with the sealant? We were at a bike shop this morning and saw a pack of the Stan's which looked quite big (maybe 400-500ml). Then there were some small bottles (I'd guess 100ml or so). How much of this do you need?

Gorilla tape is only 50 mm

It only has to cover the spoke holes

Make sure u use gorilla as it's the best tape and last the longest

 

If one wrap doesn't cover the spoke holes u will have to layer

I put in 3 scoops in to start up on a tubeless fatty

 

After u put the tape on put the tube back in for a few rides , then take tube out but leave one bead attached to rim

Put in sealant and maybe some soapy water around the bead them pump up

You will probably need a compressor for a big burst of air

Once it has seated pump up to max pressure and shake rim , then ride around a bit before lowering pressure

Cheers

Ivp

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Are you going to change the tires first up or try the sealant kit and see if it works with your existing tires and rims? Interested to see how you go.

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I'm still trying to sort out some wheel issues first. 2 broken spokes in a few weeks.

I know mtb could be hard on wheels but when all my riding is done with a 10 year old it's nothing too extreme.

I I magine fixing spokes could be a messy and expensive job with sealant and tape involved, so once we get the wheels sorted I'll probably just get the shop to do it.

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especially if you make sure you top up the sealant every 3 months or so (though I'd regularly go for 6). The sealant will dry up over time. Interesting to have a look inside after a year or so, you will find all these little balls of latex that have formed around the small holes in the tyre.

 

Slowman, IP.

 

Do you detach the tire or just go round the edges?

Edited by Kamal2

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I believe you have giant rims roxxi

there lies your problem!!!!!!

Don't worry I'm asking some questions. Especially since the last one is the nipple that has sheared off.

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no need to detatch the tyre

just put new sealant in through valve

Dumb question.

 

How does the sealant fall into place? And how would you clear the valve. Is there some kind

of attachment for that?

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take out the valve core and pour it in. Replace valve core and pump up then spin. Must admit I've always just popped a small section of one bead off and poured it in then re seated tyre.

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Dumb question.

 

How does the sealant fall into place? And how would you clear the valve. Is there some kind

of attachment for that?

I've never had the valve stem clog up, but if it did, just stick a small drill bit or allen key through the hole to clear it. The only problem with replacing sealant through the valve stem is you can't remove the latex balls that form in your tyre over time. They can grow quite large (20-30mm dia) - you'll hear them rolling around when you spin your wheel slowly.

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Don't worry I'm asking some questions. Especially since the last one is the nipple that has sheared off.

Giant Bikes in general are pretty good value but the wheels they supply on low/mid range XTC and Anthems are pretty ordinary. Surprising you're busting spokes considering the P-XC2 are bombproof and weigh a tonne! Sounds like they've been over-tensioned. Best upgrade you can make is to get a set of Stans/hope Arch tubeless ready wheels, or the latest Hope wheelsets that CRC sell.

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My 29er Giant rims have been fine with the Maxxis Ikon tubeless tyres. Have had one issue with burping but my fault running about 15psi

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Considering one busted spoke turned to 3 without any riding Ill be having a long talk with the bike shop this arvo.

 

All spokes have sheared at the nipple, and as far as I am aware (since its all front wheel its easy to spot) have occurred when not riding.

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Considering one busted spoke turned to 3 without any riding Ill be having a long talk with the bike shop this arvo.

 

All spokes have sheared at the nipple, and as far as I am aware (since its all front wheel its easy to spot) have occurred when not riding.

I'd be pushing them pretty hard for a complete respoke or replacement wheels. Either the wheels were built with a dud batch of spokes or they have been massively over tensioned. It would take a lot of abuse to break spokes on a front MTB wheel assuming they are built correctly!

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15 psi???? I thought I was low with 20 psi. (2.8inch wide)

Laziness. Had ridden about 8 times without pumping or using the gauge. Not my best work.

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My 29er Giant rims have been fine with the Maxxis Ikon tubeless tyres. Have had one issue with burping but my fault running about 15psi

Just had a Demo on the Ikons by a guy who runs them. Highly impressed with the tread on the 2.2's,

same as other Maxxis I guess.

 

Then another guy showed his Schwalbe Rocket's, a lighter tire, right. He complained of occassional

punctures or flats and he showed me the areas of sealant spread and seepage, which was evident

over maybe 20% of the surface.

 

Since the Maxxis are about half the price of the Schwalbe's, and I don't like hassling with the

sealant, I think I'm going with the Ikon's.

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The LBS replaced all the nipples with brass ones to prevent it "hopefully" happening again.

 

So I will ride it a few times then if it is all ok , the said they will do the rear as well then tubeless it for me.

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The LBS replaced all the nipples with brass ones to prevent it "hopefully" happening again.

 

So I will ride it a few times then if it is all ok , the said they will do the rear as well then tubeless it for me.

 

Good,result there

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no need to detatch the tyre

just put new sealant in through valve

Yes the Stans tubeless valves are able to be unscrewed so the valve mechanism comes out of the stem. You need a Stans sealant syringe to do it easily though for a top up. The end screws onto the valve stem but just ensure air is getting in an out through the stem before you attach it otherwise you might have a battle on your hands. And if you think you can overcome the resistance with force you will probably blow the tube off the end of the syringe and get sealant everywhere! Been there done that. The syringe needs to be washed out afterwards too as it can gum up.

 

Some times I just pop the bead open and pour it in using a squirt bottle I have with a nozzle. Here is a neat trick that can help the sealant seal bigger holes and sidewall holes like one I have that is causing a slow leaker...

 

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A good option is Ikon rear Ardent Race front. With the Ardent race on the front you can predict losing the front better than with the Ikon in my experience. In comparison th eIkon is vague and does not give you as much notice before letting go.

 

15 psi WAY too low. You must almost be rolling the tyre off the rim. It is also a very good way to destroy your rims. If you are 65-70kgs you can get away with 20-25. I ran 22 most times on loose over hard pack and technical courses. Heavier riders need more psi.

 

Edit: If you are having trouble getting the bead to set try alittle dishwashing liquid on the bead and a taking out the valve core before trying to inflate it first time. It will go down again after you unhook the compressor. Then re inflate after putting Stans in.

 

Don't over inflate with stans in or you will look like the money shot at the end of a porn movie :boff:

Edited by thekeeper
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i went for a ride the other day and got two flats. one pinch flat and i noticed the other tyre was flat when i got home later.

 

i am still battling with how much pressure to put in my tyres. i prefer to have them around 50-60psi but i realise this is too much. if they are lower, around 30 psi i feel more prone to pinch flats.

 

i think i might convert to tubless soonish.

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i went for a ride the other day and got two flats. one pinch flat and i noticed the other tyre was flat when i got home later.

 

i am still battling with how much pressure to put in my tyres. i prefer to have them around 50-60psi but i realise this is too much. if they are lower, around 30 psi i feel more prone to pinch flats.

 

i think i might convert to tubless soonish.

How much do you weigh?

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Dromana

I have settled on 28 front 30 rear for a 29inch DS XC bike, I weigh 88kg

The ride gets harsh at above 35psi. I'm running tubes but may go tubeless when I buy new tires soon

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90

30 is probably at the lower limit running tubes at 90kg. Use a good digital gauge if you aren't already. I've had 2 digital gauges which read 2-3 psi lower than my 2 track pumps... (1 is a top end pump). 3psi can make a lot of difference with mtb tyres. For all-round fun and handling, stick a 2.35 chunky tyre (Nobby Nic etc) up front and 2.25 faster rolling tyre the back. Run them tubeless at 25-28 as a starting point.

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30 is probably at the lower limit running tubes at 90kg. Use a good digital gauge if you aren't already. I've had 2 digital gauges which read 2-3 psi lower than my 2 track pumps... (1 is a top end pump). 3psi can make a lot of difference with mtb tyres. For all-round fun and handling, stick a 2.35 chunky tyre (Nobby Nic etc) up front and 2.25 faster rolling tyre the back. Run them tubeless at 25-28 as a starting point.

Thank you

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30 is probably at the lower limit running tubes at 90kg. Use a good digital gauge if you aren't already. I've had 2 digital gauges which read 2-3 psi lower than my 2 track pumps... (1 is a top end pump). 3psi can make a lot of difference with mtb tyres. For all-round fun and handling, stick a 2.35 chunky tyre (Nobby Nic etc) up front and 2.25 faster rolling tyre the back. Run them tubeless at 25-28 as a starting point.

Great advice here

Thanks chookie

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Don't over inflate with stans in or you will look like the money shot at the end of a porn movie :boff:

funny but not funny when it happens!

 

...For all-round fun and handling, stick a 2.35 chunky tyre (Nobby Nic etc) up front and 2.25 faster rolling tyre the back. Run them tubeless at 25-28 as a starting point.

Racing Ralphs fit that bill. Never tried 2.35 up front but it makes sense especially on my HT with only 80mm travel.

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The LBS replaced all the nipples with brass ones to prevent it "hopefully" happening again.

 

So I will ride it a few times then if it is all ok , the said they will do the rear as well then tubeless it for me.

 

So this weekend two of the rear nipples snapped (both in the garage not riding) so the pair are in to get the rear nipples redone then tubeless.

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Â

So this weekend two of the rear nipples snapped (both in the garage not riding) so the pair are in to get the rear nipples redone then tubeless.Â

something isn't right here... (no shit Sherlock). Were they drive side spokes? There has to be a straightforward reason as to why spokes are breaking without mechanical interference (sticks, rider weight etc). Either rubbish spokes and nipples, massive over tensioning, uneven tension between spokes on the same side. IMO the wheels need to be stripped down and rebuilt. Also keep in mind that if spokes are tensioned with tyres fitted and inflated, when the tyre goes flat or is removed, spoke tension increases quite a lot.

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No they guys at the shop (ABC Bikes) reckon its a poor design, using alloy nipples. They are the Giant wheels. The nipples are literally failing, just popping apart with the "flange" coming away. They are just respoking the wheels with brass nipples (no charge).

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If travelling with tubeless. Can you depend on a conventional pump to pump them up?

 

How about high pressure pumps in Servo's? Is their any adaptor for that?

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