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Lostkiwi

Bike setup similar to road bike?

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I get a bit of a sore back on my yeti ASR. It's probably to do with using my back and core more on a mountain bike, but it got me thinking. Is it a good idea to having a similar setup to my road bike. Obviously the bars are wider on a mtb, but should I make reach drop etc the same?

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so many variables to consider with MTB set up. Stem length: generally shorter, seat height: slightly lower than road set up seems to be very common... try 1cm lower and see how you go. Bar height has a dramatic effect on handling. Too high and it's hard to get your weight over the front wheel on steep climbs; too low and descending is compromised. Maybe start at level with saddle and try lowering a cm at a time to see what works best. I'm not sure whether too many other than XC racers have much drop at all.

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One thing to consider is hand position, the MTB position is at 90 deg to your road position. This can have an impact on your back.

My seat is slightly lower on the mtb, but I now have a dropper seatpost so am going to lift the extended height to that of my road bike.

Another thing I find is that on the mtb I move around a lot more to try and get comfortable on the road, the position is a bit of a compromise compared to the road bike. Seat lower to handle the drops, bumps etc. Bars are closer in due to the shape.

I have my mtb set up more for riding trails than the ideal road position if that makes sense.

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I get a bit of a sore back on my yeti ASR. It's probably to do with using my back and core more on a mountain bike, but it got me thinking. Is it a good idea to having a similar setup to my road bike. Obviously the bars are wider on a mtb, but should I make reach drop etc the same?

 

I have not had back issues that I can recall, road or MTB.

 

When I ride on the MTB on the road, I try to have the bike in TT position. Seat up but not much above the level of the handlebars in my current set up. If in a group and if leading out or if solo, I will centre my hands and profile myself into what feels similar to TTor Tri position. It is especially helpful riding into a headwind. There are times I would have liked to move the forward a bit (173 cm, riding a Small size frame), I do it if I have time..

 

The problem then is mixing the ride off/on road. In the interest of safety I will lower my seat, and shift back and forth on the saddle.

 

I know this is a novice level answer, but what I'm saying is, if trying to ride fast you need to get as aero as possible. Even if I can't hold the position long, that's what I aim for.

Edited by Kamal2

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You got a sore back mostly because you are not used to mountain biking. It is alot more physical than being on the roadie. That and you are not used to the style of riding and tense up more. You tend to fight the course alot more and that wears on you. Lots of time standing tightens the hammies too.

 

Especially if you went straight onto bumpy tracks. Just give it a few weeks of once to twice per week and it will go away. If I lay off the mountain bike for a month I feel the same way.

 

GENERALLY Don't lower your saddle as that will cause other issues. 1 cm lower saddle is huge! That is not good advice (no offence intended to the original poster).

 

Most good XC guys have a lot of drop and even run negative stems.

Edited by thekeeper
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PS. Lots of people from other disciplines will make you go narrow bars. I made this mistake, avoid this. A very good (international) downhiller mate put me straight. You will have more control with wider bars. The only issue is 1% of th etime you will struglle with bar width on narrow obstacles.

Edited by thekeeper
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You got a sore back mostly because you are not used to mountain biking. It is alot more physical than being on the roadie. That and you are not used to the style of riding and tense up more. You tend to fight the course alot more and that wears on you. Lots of time standing tightens the hammies too.

 

Especially if you went straight onto bumpy tracks. Just give it a few weeks of once to twice per week and it will go away. If I lay off the mountain bike for a month I feel the same way.

 

GENERALLY Don't lower your saddle as that will cause other issues. 1 cm lower saddle is huge! That is not good advice (no offence intended to the original poster).

 

Most good XC guys have a lot of drop and even run negative stems.

1cm isn't a big deal and you'll find out pretty quickly if it works or not. Saddle height isn't an exact science and considering many triathletes have their saddles set too high, 1cm will probably bring them closer to optimal. As with tt set up, there are so many variables and if you looked at 10 of the best riders you'd find their set ups are all different!

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1cm isn't a big deal and you'll find out pretty quickly if it works or not. Saddle height isn't an exact science and considering many triathletes have their saddles set too high, 1cm will probably bring them closer to optimal. As with tt set up, there are so many variables and if you looked at 10 of the best riders you'd find their set ups are all different!

 

I was advised to drop it more than 1cm and it helped me when descending. But after a short time period I found it disadvantaged me the rest of the time. I usually ride in TT position, so for off road I will drop it about 1 cm, not more.

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Descending is a problem with a correct height saddle because you are not practised at moving around on your bike. Fix the problem not the sympton. When your saddle is too low it becomes more difficult to make sustained power.

 

:smile1:

Edited by thekeeper

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1cm isn't a big deal and you'll find out pretty quickly if it works or not. Saddle height isn't an exact science and considering many triathletes have their saddles set too high, 1cm will probably bring them closer to optimal. As with tt set up, there are so many variables and if you looked at 10 of the best riders you'd find their set ups are all different!

My response was based on your recommendation being 1cm lower than road height. ASSUMING your road saddle height is correct why mess with it?

 

I'm not sure I ever said eveyone sets up the same, so I apologise if I gave that impression.

Edited by thekeeper

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My response was based on your recommendation being 1cm lower than road height. ASSUMING your road saddle height is correct why mess with it?

 

I'm not sure I ever said eveyone sets up the same, so I apologise if I gave that impression.

As a starting point I suggested trying a 1cm drop as he was experiencing problems. It wasn't a blanket recommendation. I said that running a slightly lower seat height was very common (which many threads on the subject seem to indicate). For the record I am perhaps 5mm mm lower. Has improved my comfort and has had no effect on power.

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