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Mike Honcho

The Expat Thread.

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A pittance in our scale and view. But it can be 5 times or more than what they would earn in their home country. I'm not saying that's fair, but that's the wage and salary market.

 

It's not just the expats who have the hired help. Most 'locals' have maids and often more than one. A driver may take their kids to school but they will drive themselves to the mall in the Cayenne GTS.

 

Yep, I agree, although I'm one of those people that hasn't lived there.

 

From what I've read, it seems to be a situation of market forces. Lots of help available due to the immigration, so prices are cheap. Some go over for high paying jobs and are suddenly in a situation where they are relatively rich in a country where the wage paid is acceptable.

 

I don't think we should judge people or their actions by simply being a part of the system in which they live.

 

If I go to a shop and see something priced at $2, I pay $2 even if I've seen the same thing at another store for $5. I don't give them $5. I give them the price they are asking.

 

In a twisted way, I am also reluctant to bargain someone down - here or overseas. I feel it's rude and disrespectful - even in those countries where it's "expected" of tourists.

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You may as well stay at home then.

 

Why do you say that?

 

According to this list there are 89 Countries considered "Free" and another 55 considered "partially free". I think this alone would make them safer places for a young person to visit than countries that are rated "not free".

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Safer to visit or safer to visit while acting the same way you do in your own country?

 

I am in the camp of not wasting my energy worrying about what other people choose to do but that said, I would be very much disappointed with my life if I spent it all living in Australia. It is a great big world. Some of it good, some of but not so. See as much as you can. The only thing that will keep me away from somewhere is the danger of random physical harm. The rest you use your noggin and conduct yourself appropriately.

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The ones who have not travelled can only compare what they are reading to what they know in Australia. If the professional expats all left the ME I imagine it would have zero impact on the market forces that set the standard for unskilled labour. I have an Indian guy that cleans my car and used to wonder how he makes ends meet. Turns out he owns a mango plantation back in India and travels home for harvest season. The 9 mths of the year he spends in bahrain he takes on maintenance and cleaning work to significantly boost his family income and keep the farm running. It's all relative.

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Why do you say that?

 

According to this list there are 89 Countries considered "Free" and another 55 considered "partially free". I think this alone would make them safer places for a young person to visit than countries that are rated "not free".

 

That list is the biggest load of US propaganda codswallop ever. It is disappointing that you would take this on face value and you really should learn to look at the world from a different perspective. Have a look at the ratings of Iran and Israel for example or Russia and tell me this list is objective. Once again, I have to stress I am not anti Australia or US but you have to cut through the cr@p and see the world the way it is, not the way CNN tells you to.

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That list is the biggest load of US propaganda codswallop ever. It is disappointing that you would take this on face value and you really should learn to look at the world from a different perspective. Have a look at the ratings of Iran and Israel for example or Russia and tell me this list is objective. Once again, I have to stress I am not anti Australia or US but you have to cut through the cr@p and see the world the way it is, not the way CNN tells you to.

 

I guess I am just not sophisticated and worldly like you are Pete.

 

So the only way to find out is to actually go there, all other research or statistics from NGOs or the UN are a waste of time? Or is there a trustworthy source of information that can give people an honest idea of how safe or free a country is?

 

It seems a bit narrow minded to me to think there is only one way to know anything about a place and that is first hand... then again I don't get out much. For now I will continue to discourage my 18yo from visiting any country with Sharia Law until she has some more travelling and life experience. Just to be on the safe side.

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I guess I am just not sophisticated and worldly like you are Pete.

 

So the only way to find out is to actually go there, all other research or statistics from NGOs or the UN are a waste of time? Or is there a trustworthy source of information that can give people an honest idea of how safe or free a country is?

 

It seems a bit narrow minded to me to think there is only one way to know anything about a place and that is first hand... then again I don't get out much. For now I will continue to discourage my 18yo from visiting any country with Sharia Law until she has some more travelling and life experience. Just to be on the safe side.

Sorry, that was a little strong. The paradigm of the US being the universal arbiter of right and wrong gets in my craw a bit sometimes.

Edited by Pete

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Why do you say that?

 

According to this list there are 89 Countries considered "Free" and another 55 considered "partially free". I think this alone would make them safer places for a young person to visit than countries that are rated "not free".

I just find it odd that that is part of your selection criteria for a holiday. It would limit where you visited. But if you do go to some of these places, it makes you really appreciate what we have in Australia.

Having said that...what is safe? Copenhagen, Sydney, Boston and London could all have been considered safe once.

 

Anyway....Ramadan Kareem to those in the Gulf. Went for a nice run along the Corniche here tonite. Pretty warm and humid but picturesque all the same.

Need to now address the hydration issue in public for the next month. Might start running after dark more often.

 

https://connect.garmin.com/activity/806923555#

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EX.

 

There are several different types of ex pat contract.

 

Married status with benefits accrued over a number of years, spending a good amount of income back to the local economy.

 

Or single status with frequent short vacations, in effect getting out as money as possible in the shortest time. No reference to Softly here, but we came to dislike those people who hated the dam place, yet would extract the money while ripping the place apart.

 

I like to think I contributed something positive back to the country. Money of course is important, but I would still derive enjoyment from living over there,

 

EX.....Probably with Aussie Telecom there in Riyadh, early 90's? But that was a brief period, Aussies got it by underbidding Bell Canada and unfortunately low balled the whole operation, within 3 years the where out and Saudi German Telephone took over, a typical Saudi botch job. The Canadians put in the system and did well with it, the others less so mostly because of financial reasons.

No, they were 2 totally different situations. One was to come in and build a public broadcast network prior to what I think was to be the first "democratic" elections in Cambodia in the early 90's. There was still a lot of unrest, and if some-one wanted to disrupt things, where we would have been working was a logical target.

The 2nd instance was long term work in Port Moresby. Minimum contract of 2 years and came with security gaurds, dogs and compound living. Not exactly the environment to bring up a young daughter.

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I just find it odd that that is part of your selection criteria for a holiday. It would limit where you visited. But if you do go to some of these places, it makes you really appreciate what we have in Australia.

Having said that...what is safe? Copenhagen, Sydney, Boston and London could all have been considered safe once.

 

 

Guess I am overly protective and cautious when it comes to my daughter travelling alone and probably a little indifferent when it comes to myself. I have been over seas a few times and don't recall it being particularly enlightening.

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MM, since you have researched this, how about a quick listing of countries who apply Sharia Law?

 

For now I will continue to discourage my 18yo from visiting any country with Sharia Law until she has some more travelling and life experience. Just to be on the safe side.

And of those how many have open borders, no lengthy visa requirements or are not currently engaged in any form of civil unrest?

How about Sudan or Southern Sudan, does anyone go to such places?

Edited by Kamal2

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Guess I am overly protective and cautious when it comes to my daughter travelling alone and probably a little indifferent when it comes to myself. I have been over seas a few times and don't recall it being particularly enlightening.

You normally come across as a man with good common sense and well-grounded intellect, so this statement surprises me. I've had the opposite experience with travel and value it very highly. I've spent a total of about 6 years living/traveling outside of Aus and consider travel as the most enriching kind of education. Seeing the other side of the coin really helps people form fair opinions about so many issues.

Edited by The Customer

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Guess I am overly protective and cautious when it comes to my daughter travelling alone and probably a little indifferent when it comes to myself. I have been over seas a few times and don't recall it being particularly enlightening.

This is not necessarily a bad strategy to guide a young person who sometime fail to understand that people all over the world are very different and view things very differently from what it is in Australia.

 

Trying to get too much of the local flavour can land you in trouble as well if you are not cautious.

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For my 2 cents (or 2p now), I don't think it has anything to do with tax rates, domicile status or the rates of pay for low skilled workers or many of the other things mentioned on this thread .... but I can't help myself and will comment at the end of this.

 

For me, it has everything to do with becoming more worldly and seeing parts of the world I would never have seen had I not done it. It is true that I love Australia, it's landscape and it's people. I return to see family and friends often and may return at some stage .... but I don't know just yet.

 

My story is that, after a redundancy from Ford in 2007, I jumped a plane for Heathrow and landed with all my possessions in my hands. Arrived on Easter Sunday, 2007. It was incredibly liberating and scary. I had been OS three times before then - and was 34 - all for Ironman NZ (so that was like going to Tasmania) and I had not a clue about living in another country. I had three interviews lined up and did as much research as I could, but the rest was made up as I went along. Had to find a job, a home, a new way of living....

 

Arrived just before the financial crash and it was madness for about 4 years. I started my own business in the midst of this and have been lucky enough to win Employee of the Month for 61 months straight!!!! I have been places I never imagined I would, I split from a long-term Partner, I was almost bankrupt and clawed my way back, I met a Beatle and a Rolling Stone, met the woman of my dreams (whom I intend to propose to in August) and did things like going to work one morning and ended up clubbing in another country!

 

Have also taken British Citizenship and barracked for another country in sports events, but can still find a place that sells VB and can tune in to watch the V8s every couple of weeks.

 

Highlights:

I have made friends .... and people I would consider not friends.

Work - so much more opportunity to risk something and be rewarded. Bosses are also more keen to promote on ability, not longevity

Starting an MBA

Sport - XC skiing in Norway, Finland, Sweden, Italy, Austria, France, Latvia, Triathlon across most of the northern hemisphere (they do things so differently over here!), Open Water Swimming races, Wild Swimming, Multisport races in Wales and Scotland

Travel - enough said. Everywhere!

 

Lowlights (there are some)

My ex cleaning me out.

It can be lonely at the start ... and draining.

Being judged because you're from Australia .... it happens.

 

However, for me, it was the best thing I did since repeating Year 11 in 1990.

 

By the way, on the point of paying low skilled help, I pay £10/hour and travel fares for my cleaner. This is well less than I could afford to live on and well above the average rate. But, my cleaner has access to everything I own and could - if she wanted - clean me out before I know it, so happy to pay the extra, as she is to receive it. It's tax free, so it's almost as much as my girlfriend earns / hour as a GP!!!

 

On the point of domicile, get an accountant to sort this for you in each country and have them talk to each other. There is no way you can reasonably do this off the side of your desk and keep up with the latest decisions. If things go wrong for you, you can then sue them.

 

On the point of "being a sh1thole", don't ever diss another person's country. They may not know any better and all you should do is try and educate them to change it. I didn't like Russia (having a gun pulled on me by my taxi driver 45 minutes after arriving has something to do with it!) and love Norway .... but that is just my take on it.

 

Hope that was helpful. If you're thinking of doing it, do it.

 

Cam

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You normally come across as a man with good common sense and well-grounded intellect, so this statement surprises me. I've had the opposite experience with travel and value it very highly. I've spent a total of about 6 years living/traveling outside of Aus and consider travel as the most enriching kind of education. Seeing the other side of the coin really helps people form fair opinions about so many issues.

 

Common sense has little to do with how someone worries about their children. She turned 18 last week, has never lived out of home and plans to travel alone to places like Morocco where DFAT recommends a "High degree of caution". She is a smart young lady, great marks, school captain at high school and all that, but I still have concern with her ability to exercise a high degree of caution. I am sure she will most likely be fine, however she is more likely to be finerer eating at a Moroccan restaurant in Aukland.

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Common sense has little to do with how someone worries about their children. She turned 18 last week, has never lived out of home and plans to travel alone to places like Morocco where DFAT recommends a "High degree of caution". She is a smart young lady, great marks, school captain at high school and all that, but I still have concern with her ability to exercise a high degree of caution. I am sure she will most likely be fine, however she is more likely to be finerer eating at a Moroccan restaurant in Aukland.

 

I fully understand your concern.

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I agree with the sentiment as well - but you only need to protect her till the time she stops asking for advice on which places to go.

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Why do you say that?

 

According to this list there are 89 Countries considered "Free" and another 55 considered "partially free". I think this alone would make them safer places for a young person to visit than countries that are rated "not free".

 

I like the Press freedom Index. We are currently ranked between Ghana and Belize. Just above UK. Thanks Rupert.

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Guess I am overly protective and cautious when it comes to my daughter travelling alone and probably a little indifferent when it comes to myself. I have been over seas a few times and don't recall it being particularly enlightening.

 

That puts a whole 'nuther light on it. I can see where you are coming from - I imagine I will be equally as over-protective as and when my daughter is old enough to travel independently. Suffice to say, I would rather she travel in a group or with friends and to places typically regarded as "safe".We are leaving tomorrow with the rest of the family to the Greek Islands for 4 weeks - who knows what could happen even there with riots etc over their debt crisis and austerity deadlines? (But I suspect the food, retsina, azure seas, sun-drenched beaches and stunning vistas of the Santorini Caldera at sunset might just be worth it... :))

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They just need to do what I've done and never actually earn enough to meet the threshold!

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Bump.....

 

Picking up on earlier parts of this thread re: Resident for tax purposes ....

 

I have just come thru and audit by the ATO as they identified I had not submitted returns for 2012, 2013 and 2014 yet there was a trail of international deposits to my Australian bank.

 

I have not lived or worked in Australia since mid 2003 and had established places of abode wherever I worked, visited Australia infrequently and for minimal time, so I knew it was a matter of presenting a solid case.

 

Rather than try to do it myself, I engaged a Brisbane law firm and provided all the info to them. Over a period of 2 weeks, we put the case together and they presented it on my behalf and argued the points of law relating to residency.

 

Got a ruling back from the ATO Friday and they have found that I am not a resident for tax purposes. Breathing a sigh of relief for sure and glad I had stashed away all my records ( hard copies and soft ) so they were able to be presented.

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Another bump from the same muppet...

I thought of putting this in the Housing Bubble thread but thought it more relevant here.

Sold my house in Bodalla for a substantial amount in February and got slugged with Capital Gains because I'm not a resident ( that's another story ), and have had the cash in the bank since then. Have banked with the same bank for 35 years and paid out 4 mortgages in that period - all before time. No credit card debts either.

May need to borrow up to $500k on the new build so went to the bank and asked them. Nope....we can lend you maybe $200k. 

All banks are now saying our incomes generated out of Australia account for shit. 'Shadowing' was the term they used saying the income earned may be only 'worth' 25% of what it is. We are considered foreign investors in Australia.

So, if you are struggling to keep food on the table, have minimal deposit, and a job that earns you $60k, come on in...we'll give you $750k.! Just goes to show that banks are all about keeping people and countries in debt. No profits from those who can afford to pay the loans.

Rant over.... but the same time, something for other expats to consider if you're planning to borrow while you're away to make your eventual retirement back home comfortable. 

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You think the banks are bad, try the NSW govt.

We moved to Sydney again (from Auckland) in Jan, but as not Australian citizens, we have to wait 200 day or pay 4% additional stamp duty if we want to buy a house. An then if we move back to NZ, we get to pay additional annual land tax if we keep the house.

This is just a racist money grab that does nothing to cool the property prices. We wont get into us paying tax and then our kids getting treated as full fee tertiary students.

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Just had a massive argument with my UK accountant who wants me to pay tax on my worldwide income, but mainly related to the capital gain on a property I sold in December. Tax has already been paid in Australia and he wants me to pay again! Notwithstanding the dual taxation treaties that exist, I HAVE ALREADY PAID THIS TAX!!!!

Moving my business from him. He's an idiot!

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40 minutes ago, Rimmer said:

Just had a massive argument with my UK accountant who wants me to pay tax on my worldwide income, but mainly related to the capital gain on a property I sold in December. Tax has already been paid in Australia and he wants me to pay again! Notwithstanding the dual taxation treaties that exist, I HAVE ALREADY PAID THIS TAX!!!!

Moving my business from him. He's an idiot!

I thinks that's pretty standard mate and Oz also taxes you on worldwide income. What I thought though was that there is an 'exemption' process for double paying but it has to be declared in the first place.

Are saying he wants you to double pay? That sounds very weird.

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My wife got slugged by the IRS when she rolled over her super when her mother passed away. It was so bad she ended up renouncing her US citizenship but not before it cost us nearly $25,000 in US taxes.

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4 hours ago, FatPom said:

I thinks that's pretty standard mate and Oz also taxes you on worldwide income. What I thought though was that there is an 'exemption' process for double paying but it has to be declared in the first place.

Are saying he wants you to double pay? That sounds very weird.

As and Australian citizen, if you earn income out of Australia and even pay tax on it, you still have to submit an ATO return, and declare how much tax you paid in the country of earning. The ATO then decides if you have paid enough. So if you are not a 'non resident for tax purposes', you earn $100,000 in Thailand and only pay 18% tax there, the ATO can then say you owe additional $xx as you should have been paying yy%.

If you are able to satisfy the 5 criteria for becoming a 'non resident for tax purposes', you still need to fill in the return but should not be liable for Australian tax. Good Luck.

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I managed to get a construction loan sorted as a non-resident for tax purposes to build our new place in QLD. We are essentially considered foreign investors like Softy said but we managed to get it through just before the major crack down from the banks on foreign investment. Three months later an Aussie mate that I work with over here tried the same thing and got knocked back unless he could front up a 40% deposit!

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On 18/07/2017 at 2:26 PM, softy said:

As and Australian citizen, if you earn income out of Australia and even pay tax on it, you still have to submit an ATO return, and declare how much tax you paid in the country of earning. The ATO then decides if you have paid enough. So if you are not a 'non resident for tax purposes', you earn $100,000 in Thailand and only pay 18% tax there, the ATO can then say you owe additional $xx as you should have been paying yy%.

If you are able to satisfy the 5 criteria for becoming a 'non resident for tax purposes', you still need to fill in the return but should not be liable for Australian tax. Good Luck.

Yep, have declared everything on both tax returns every year since needing to. Over here, the accountants are just unfamiliar with the tax laws in Australia, but I have hopefully set them straight.  

As much as I hate paying tax, I do so and pay the fair share. Both tax regimes are largely the same, so no-one can accuse me of not paying enough!

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I think I read something about this happening to a couple overseas, who put down a 67k deposit on a unit off the plan, but now can't get the money to finance it due to changes and are going to lose that deposit now.

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5 hours ago, goughy said:

I think I read something about this happening to a couple overseas, who put down a 67k deposit on a unit off the plan, but now can't get the money to finance it due to changes and are going to lose that deposit now.

I think there is more to the story there in that he was newly self employed after leaving his PAYG job so had no provable income. He also mentions needing 2 years tax returns which is not correct according to ANZ policy. More than likely, when purchased off plan 2 years ago, he would have been made aware that he would need to reapply when the house was completed. He was relying on his British partners income to service the loan - she had no visa, residency or citizenship in Australia. So it's not all one way blame.

As for the whole loan issue, it's interesting / bizarre / funny / fcked how, for the last 15 years, my money generated out of Australia then sent and spent in Australia, has been accepted as OK but now, it accounts for as much as an Indian rupee.  

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We are buying a house in Ireland and I have had an easier time at proving income to the Bank, never having lived there than the wife who is returning there. She's a GP (which they need), but seemed to have ignored that and I'm a dime-a-dozen consultant!

Go figure!

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On 7/20/2017 at 0:18 PM, softy said:

As for the whole loan issue, it's interesting / bizarre / funny / fcked how, for the last 15 years, my money generated out of Australia then sent and spent in Australia, has been accepted as OK but now, it accounts for as much as an Indian rupee.  

For every one of you, there are 1000 Chinese snapping up what should be affordable housing in convenient locations at exorbitant prices that young buyers will never afford. I have a friend who runs a mortgage broker/investment RE all in one type operation and they happened upon a Real estate investment expo at Sydney Town Hall with 100 exhibitors and every one was Chinese. Selling units for way over-inflated prices. when they started talking to the potential buyers telling them they were being ripped off and showing them on their phone they were escorted out. Rort

And the banks are cutting back big time on australian investors as well, making it much harder to get interest only loans, increasing deposits etc etc. 

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On 18/07/2017 at 11:26 PM, softy said:

As and Australian citizen, if you earn income out of Australia and even pay tax on it, you still have to submit an ATO return, and declare how much tax you paid in the country of earning. The ATO then decides if you have paid enough. So if you are not a 'non resident for tax purposes', you earn $100,000 in Thailand and only pay 18% tax there, the ATO can then say you owe additional $xx as you should have been paying yy%.

If you are able to satisfy the 5 criteria for becoming a 'non resident for tax purposes', you still need to fill in the return but should not be liable for Australian tax. Good Luck.

If you are an Australian resident for tax purposes, you are subject to Australian tax on your worldwide income (ie it doesn't matter how or where you derived it).

If you are not an Australian resident for tax purposes, you are only subject to Australian tax on you income from Australian sources (eg rent on an Australian property).

There may be a tax treaty between Australia and the other country you are in (eg Thailand) that determines which of the two countries you are tax resident in.

Many countries (eg Australia) will give you are credit for foreign tax you paid on income.

And, of course, there are a variety of other subject tos.

Edited by trilobite

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On 7/20/2017 at 7:48 AM, softy said:

As for the whole loan issue, it's interesting / bizarre / funny / fcked how, for the last 15 years, my money generated out of Australia then sent and spent in Australia, has been accepted as OK but now, it accounts for as much as an Indian rupee.

Bump.... and I'm naming names...

Well it's been 10 weeks since we first started looking for additional finance should we need it. Have been with NAB for 35 years and paid off 3 mortgages with them - and they said bugger off. The ANZ have been reviewing for almost 10 weeks and constantly asking for more documents almost every week. But still no decision, either way.

What makes it worse is I saw a story saying the ANZ were considering spearing people if the didn't sell their monthly mortgage quotas! 

Am I becoming, sour, bitter and twisted or, is it just the way it is these days?

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3 hours ago, softy said:

Bump.... and I'm naming names...

Well it's been 10 weeks since we first started looking for additional finance should we need it. Have been with NAB for 35 years and paid off 3 mortgages with them - and they said bugger off. The ANZ have been reviewing for almost 10 weeks and constantly asking for more documents almost every week. But still no decision, either way.

What makes it worse is I saw a story saying the ANZ were considering spearing people if the didn't sell their monthly mortgage quotas! 

Am I becoming, sour, bitter and twisted or, is it just the way it is these days?

This is the norm now. We bought our house in April and are still getting dicked around by the Bank. The wife's father used to be the Governor of the Bank that we are seeking a mortgage through and the CEO was at our wedding and interviewed me for a job .... and this has done nothing to influence their behaviour. The issue is that the brokers don't talk to underwriting don't talk with Life Assurance don't talk with the valuations team don't talk with the International Team etc etc....

The fragmentation of the Bank's functions into silos to create efficiency has actually done the opposite. I have let them know!

Edited by Rimmer

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Expated my way to Gudauri in Georgia up the Caucus Mountains this week. Tops at about 10000ft. temps not stupid around -10. Cheap. two person all gear and lift tix about 30 Aussie. Gear is quality for hire stuff. Snow was good. Big month is Feb where they will have 3 feet more. 

 

It' a 3 hour flight from Dubai in the same time zone. No visa for GCC residents required. New condos built right at the gondola. under 100 bucks per night for a place that sleeps 6

Airport was excellent. No delays. off the plane, customs and had bags total 10 minutes. Driver was right there. Landed in Tblisi and 90 minute drive to ski fields. 

 

4 days exploring Tblisi starting tomorrow. 

Must visit if within range. 

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Edited by Mike Honcho
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Quote

 

Another bump from the same muppet...

I thought of putting this in the Housing Bubble thread but thought it more relevant here.

Sold my house in Bodalla for a substantial amount in February and got slugged with Capital Gains because I'm not a resident ( that's another story ), and have had the cash in the bank since then. Have banked with the same bank for 35 years and paid out 4 mortgages in that period - all before time. No credit card debts either.

May need to borrow up to $500k on the new build so went to the bank and asked them. Nope....we can lend you maybe $200k. 

All banks are now saying our incomes generated out of Australia account for shit. 'Shadowing' was the term they used saying the income earned may be only 'worth' 25% of what it is. We are considered foreign investors in Australia.

So, if you are struggling to keep food on the table, have minimal deposit, and a job that earns you $60k, come on in...we'll give you $750k.! Just goes to show that banks are all about keeping people and countries in debt. No profits from those who can afford to pay the loans.

Rant over.... but the same time, something for other expats to consider if you're planning to borrow while you're away to make your eventual retirement back home comfortable. 

 

Yeah just speaking to my mortgage manager the other day he was saying the lending has tightened quite a bit. The other day he had someone with a 3 million dollar house and no regular income, needed $600k and was knocked back. Makes sense really, no income, you can't service the loan, considered high risk by the bank.

 

Edited by Rog

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I have just started my first ex pat job. I am working at a mine in the south Gobi desert in Mongolia. The mine is about 80km from the Chinese border.

Coming from Australia the temperature has been a shock. For 6 months of the year the temperature does not get above 0. In January the temp will get down to -40.

I am starting to get used to the cold, money and food. The food is edible but not the quality and variety you would find on an Australian mine site.

Not sure if I can keep doing triathlon. The nearest pool is 550km away and there are no rowing machines in the gym. The exercise bikes are the old mechanical ones.  A couple of the treadmills work OK.

On the bright side it is exciting to be working on such a massive mine and I am finding the work interesting and challenging.

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Good work Ironnerd! I applied for a position somewhere close by earlier this year and missed out. Seeing temperatures were -29 to -10 last week, I didn't feel so bad.

The first posting and 6 months is always the hardest, no matter where you are. The food will improve as threats of a  mutiny surface, can't do much about the weather. You can always take a bike and trainer back with you next time.

The bottom line.....think of all that cash!!! You're not there for the practice, the love or to make new friends. 

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15 hours ago, Ironnerd said:

I have just started my first ex pat job. I am working at a mine in the south Gobi desert in Mongolia. The mine is about 80km from the Chinese border.

Coming from Australia the temperature has been a shock. For 6 months of the year the temperature does not get above 0. In January the temp will get down to -40.

I am starting to get used to the cold, money and food. The food is edible but not the quality and variety you would find on an Australian mine site.

Not sure if I can keep doing triathlon. The nearest pool is 550km away and there are no rowing machines in the gym. The exercise bikes are the old mechanical ones.  A couple of the treadmills work OK.

On the bright side it is exciting to be working on such a massive mine and I am finding the work interesting and challenging.

That sounds like Lionel Sanders’ Home town for 6 months of the year. 😂 Can’t you ship in a Kickr, treadmill and rowing machine to keep you going through the dead of winter?

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15 hours ago, Ironnerd said:

I have just started my first ex pat job. I am working at a mine in the south Gobi desert in Mongolia. The mine is about 80km from the Chinese border.

Coming from Australia the temperature has been a shock. For 6 months of the year the temperature does not get above 0. In January the temp will get down to -40.

I am starting to get used to the cold, money and food. The food is edible but not the quality and variety you would find on an Australian mine site.

Not sure if I can keep doing triathlon. The nearest pool is 550km away and there are no rowing machines in the gym. The exercise bikes are the old mechanical ones.  A couple of the treadmills work OK.

On the bright side it is exciting to be working on such a massive mine and I am finding the work interesting and challenging.

It's not Rio Tinto's Oyu Tolgoi mine by any chance? I work for Rio in IT and spoke to someone there the other day, I asked how cold it was. The answer was very!!!!

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2 hours ago, softy said:

Good work Ironnerd! I applied for a position somewhere close by earlier this year and missed out. Seeing temperatures were -29 to -10 last week, I didn't feel so bad.

The first posting and 6 months is always the hardest, no matter where you are. The food will improve as threats of a  mutiny surface, can't do much about the weather. You can always take a bike and trainer back with you next time.

The bottom line.....think of all that cash!!! You're not there for the practice, the love or to make new friends. 

The 8000+ nationals working here would consider the food to be pretty good, It is only soft ex pats like myself who aren't so keen on the food. There is a pizza shop on site and you can buy a decent bugger at the bar for $3

Buying a cheap trainer bike and trainer is a great idea. I could bring it as part of my luggage. Will look into doing this after I finish my 3 months probation.

2 hours ago, Andrew #1 said:

That sounds like Lionel Sanders’ Home town for 6 months of the year. 😂 Can’t you ship in a Kickr, treadmill and rowing machine to keep you going through the dead of winter?

The cost of shipping in a rowing machine to such remote location could be prohibitive. I will buy some swim stretch cords and see how I go. A trainer bike and trainer I could bring as luggage.

1 hour ago, A2K said:

It's not Rio Tinto's Oyu Tolgoi mine by any chance? I work for Rio in IT and spoke to someone there the other day, I asked how cold it was. The answer was very!!!!

I would never use Rio's computer network for personal stuff like Transitions:wink1:. How cold is it - very @#$%ing cold.

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Good work Iron Nerd,

I worked overseas about a decade ago on a couple of jobs, it was basically tax free back then and was worth it, until K Rudd bought in tax for expats....made it not worth it with the time i spent away,  certainly had some good experiences and some pretty rough ones also, riots, and political uprisings come to mind.  met some great people (who sadly i haven't stayed in contact with bar 1) and met thousands of foreign workers on the jobs and got to learn French.  Certainly a time i wont ever forget.

I'd forgotten about the horrid food until you just mentioned it though.  Happy to put that memory in the back of my mind

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19 hours ago, KieranR said:

it was basically tax free back then and was worth it, until K Rudd bought in tax for expats..

It can still be tax free if you are able to satisfy the 5 ATO criteria to be eligible as a 'Non resident for tax purposes'. 

The days of FIFO tax free are long gone. I was in Saudi in 2009 when the new ruling came in with Barclay Mowlem. Fortunately, the project had and Austrade exemption so we were not subject to Australian tax. Since then, it has become much tougher.

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13 minutes ago, softy said:

It can still be tax free if you are able to satisfy the 5 ATO criteria to be eligible as a 'Non resident for tax purposes'. 

The days of FIFO tax free are long gone. I was in Saudi in 2009 when the new ruling came in with Barclay Mowlem. Fortunately, the project had and Austrade exemption so we were not subject to Australian tax. Since then, it has become much tougher.

Agree

We had a section 23A exemption, however when the new law passed, so did that exemption for us

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